WORDS

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Doodoo
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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » March 29, 2024, 9:10 pm

Tachyon
A tachyon (/ˈtækiɒn/) or tachyonic particle is a hypothetical particle that always travels faster than light.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyon



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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » March 30, 2024, 6:15 pm

Potanthus is a large genus of skipper butterflies. They are commonly known as darts. They are found from South Asia to East Asia, and down to maritime Southeast Asia (though not extending towards New Guinea). It includes about 35 species, all of which look very similar to each other and are often only reliably identifiable through the examination of the male genitalia

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » March 31, 2024, 9:41 am

Unredacted
adjective

1.
(of text) not having had sections censored or obscured for legal or security purposes:
"a unredacted version of the report"

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 1, 2024, 4:42 pm

En·co·mi·um

noun

1.
a speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly.
formal

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 2, 2024, 3:14 pm

stupe
1 of 2
noun (1)
ˈstüp ˈstyüp
Synonyms of stupe
: a hot wet often medicated cloth applied externally (as to stimulate circulation)
stupe

2 of 2
noun (2)
: a stupid person : DOLT

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » April 2, 2024, 9:03 pm

The comfrey family comes in a range of colours, from white to pale yellow, pink to bluish-violet, a result of the various species’ eagerness to hybridise. It favours damp places, and grows a long tap root which, once established, can be difficult to dig out; despite this it’s considered the gardener’s friend as it’s able to draw up vital minerals and nutrients from deep in the soil which can be harvested, via the plant’s leaves, and made into liquid fertiliser. It’s loved by bees and other pollinators, too, and has been used in many different cultures as a poultice to heal bruises, sprains and even fractures, hence its common name of knitbone. It’s also good for soothing nettle stings.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 3, 2024, 2:31 pm

Fartlek

This is an activity runners do when they change between sprinting and jogging.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » April 3, 2024, 6:02 pm

There are 40 species of UK woodlice. They range in size from the tiny common pygmy woodlouse, whose reddish body is only 5mm long, to the gargantuan sea slater, which can reach 3cm. Like many woodlice, the common pygmy might be found in a garden among the leaf litter, while the sea slater belongs to the large group of woodlice that live exclusively in coastal regions, often in the splash zone itself. This adherence to littoral environments gives a fascinating glimpse into the woodlouse’s evolutionary past. Closely related to shrimps, crabs and lobsters, woodlice are basically aquatic crustaceans that crawled free of the ocean. Growing feet, they became land lubbers. Natural recyclers, woodlice feed on decaying plant matter.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 3, 2024, 7:14 pm

Everywhen

This isn’t a typo, it means “always” or “all the time.”

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 5, 2024, 5:46 am

Rev·o·ca·tion

noun

1.
the official cancellation of a decree, decision, or promise:
"for those who break the law, revocation of their liquor license may result"

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 7, 2024, 8:39 am

"Chav

also "charver", "scally" and "roadman" in parts of England, is a British term, usually used in a pejorative way. The term is used to describe an anti-social lower-class youth dressed in sportswear. The use of the word has been described as a form of "social racism". "Chavette" is a related term referring to female chavs, and the adjectives "chavvy", "chavvish", and "chavtastic" are used to describe things associated with chavs, such as fashion, slang, etc.In other countries like Ireland, "Skanger" is used in a similar manner. In Canada, in the province of British Columbia they're known as "Surrey jacks". In Ontario (particularly in Toronto), the term is "hoodman", an equivalent of the term "roadman" used in England. In Newfoundland, "skeet" is used in a similar way, while in Australia, "eshay" or "adlay" is used

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » April 8, 2024, 10:12 am

We think of spring as a time of fresh green growth, but the new leaves of several common trees, shrubs and plants aren’t green at all. Many roses put out red foliage at the start of the growing season which later turns green; the younger leaves of photinia blaze out bright scarlet, and both oaks and sycamores display a ruddy tint when coming into leaf. While the hue is due to the build-up of anthocyanins, there is no scientific consensus on why this occurs. The competing theories are that it’s photoprotective — a defence against UV damage — or that it prevents insects from eating the leaves, either visually or by an altered taste. However, the evidence is not conclusive either way.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 8, 2024, 7:46 pm

Erf

You may think this is some sort of sound, but it’s actually a word that means “plot of land.”

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 8, 2024, 8:16 pm

A sapper, also called a combat engineer, is a combatant or soldier who performs a variety of military engineering duties, such as breaching fortifications, demolitions, bridge-building, laying or clearing minefields, preparing field defenses, and road and airfield construction and repair.

Sappers are also trained and equipped to serve secondarily as provisional infantry.

Sappers facilitate and support the movement, defense, and survival of superordinate and allied forces, and impede those of enemies.

The term "sapper" is used in the British Army and Commonwealth nations, the U.S. military, and the militaries of other countries.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » April 9, 2024, 8:24 pm

Anyone with a garden bird feeder will know how welcome a visitor a siskin is. Yellowy-green, with barred wings, a streaky tummy, a forked tail and, in the case of the male, a smart black cap, these are tiny finches — much smaller than a greenfinch — but full of character. They are as acrobatic as blue tits and will hang upside down to get at seeds: small wonder, as in woodland they specialise in dissecting the dangling cones of alder, pine, birch and spruce. Numbers of siskin have risen here by a third in the past 30 years, so what was once a comparative rarity for gardens is becoming more of a common sight. Listen out for their wheezy, twittering song.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » April 10, 2024, 7:20 pm

The march of the American skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanus) seems unstoppable. A native of swamps and wet woodlands in the US Pacific Northwest, American skunk cabbage was introduced to Britain in 1901 as an ornamental plant for ponds and bog gardens. By 1947, it had established itself in the wilds of Surrey. From the home counties, the plant has spread through the rest of the country. With highly mobile seeds that travel via water, bird or mammal, it quickly colonises suitable habitat, such as stream banks, pond edges or wet woodland. Its large, leathery leaves allow it to outcompete other species, by casting shade over them. The tiny flowers grow on a central spike, screened by beautiful yellow “lantern-like” hoods. Jonathan Tulloch

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 10, 2024, 9:05 pm

Meldrop

Unfortunately, this isn’t a food. Instead, it’s a drop of mucus hanging from someone’s nose.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Whistler » April 10, 2024, 9:36 pm

Doodoo wrote:
April 7, 2024, 8:39 am
"Chav

also "charver", "scally" and "roadman" in parts of England, is a British term, usually used in a pejorative way. The term is used to describe an anti-social lower-class youth dressed in sportswear. The use of the word has been described as a form of "social racism". "Chavette" is a related term referring to female chavs, and the adjectives "chavvy", "chavvish", and "chavtastic" are used to describe things associated with chavs, such as fashion, slang, etc.In other countries like Ireland, "Skanger" is used in a similar manner. In Canada, in the province of British Columbia they're known as "Surrey jacks". In Ontario (particularly in Toronto), the term is "hoodman", an equivalent of the term "roadman" used in England. In Newfoundland, "skeet" is used in a similar way, while in Australia, "eshay" or "adlay" is used
I have never heard these Australian terms, whoever supplied this information is not describing contemporary usage. As for low class youth in sportswear, I don't think there is any word in the Australian vernacular that has any such term
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Re: WORDS

Post by jackspratt » April 10, 2024, 10:18 pm

You need to get out more.

Even I have heard and read "eshay" numerous times.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » April 10, 2024, 10:37 pm

Whistle
By simply using a Search you could have come up with this "https://www.thetrendspotter.net/what-is-an-eshay/" OR " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eshay"

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