WORDS

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tamada
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Re: WORDS

Post by tamada » January 3, 2024, 12:54 pm

carnaptious
adjective
car·​nap·​tious (ˈ)kär¦napshəs, kərˈn-
dialectal, chiefly Scottish
: bad-tempered

It is most often used to describe someone ill-tempered and grumpy; most likely on the warpath and looking for a fight for very little, if any reason.

Etymologists believe the word may be derived from the verb ‘knap’, meaning to bite or to snap, appropriate enough when you consider the way a person who is said to be ‘carnaptious’ can make you feel.

Normally associated with the elderly, the term has fallen out of use in favour of the milder ‘crabbit,’ which unfortunately doesn’t really convey the same sort of anger.

Francis Begbie, the infamous hardman of Irvine Welsh’s ‘Trainspotting’ novel and portrayed so vividly by Robert Carlyle in the big screen version, is a fine example of a carnaptious soul. Who can forget that violent scene in the pub, where all hell breaks loose when someone has the audacity to knock into Begbie?

Although falling out of popular use, and not nearly as common as it used to be, carnaptious is still a term reserved by some Scots to describe that pent-up, unwavering anger simmering beneath someone’s surface.

https://www.scotsman.com/arts-and-cultu ... us-1589276


'Don't waste your words on people who deserve your silence'
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'You don't have to be afraid of everything you don't understand'
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Re: WORDS

Post by Pro V1 » January 3, 2024, 3:20 pm

An elegant and underused word is ‘leitmotif’.

The English word leitmotif comes from the German Leitmotiv, meaning "leading motive," and is formed from the verb leiten ("to lead") and the noun Motiv ("motive"). In its original sense, the word was applied to Wagnerian opera music, and while it is still commonly used with reference to musical drama it is now also used more broadly within general parlance to refer to any recurring theme. My own personal definition of leitmotif is ‘guiding thread’.
A recent example of usage is as follows:
Threatening to resign would become a leitmotif in Kissinger’s career.
—Timothy Naftali, Foreign Affairs, 1 Dec. 2023

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 4, 2024, 8:00 am

Acumen — ability, skill

the ability to make good judgments and quick decisions, typically in a particular domain:
"business acumen"

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Laan Yaa Mo
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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » January 4, 2024, 3:18 pm

ปกติ (adverb) = normal

From Pali pakati (“original or natural form, natural state or condition; etc.”); compare Sanskrit प्रकृति (prakṛti, “nature; character; constitution; etc.”). Cognate with Burmese ပကတိ (pa.ka.ti.), Khmer ប្រក្រតី (praʼkrɑdəy), បកតិ (bɑkteʼ), Lao ປົກກະຕິ (pok ka ti). Doublet of ปรกติ (bpròk-gà-dtì).
You only pass through this life once, you don't come back for an encore.

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AlexO
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Re: WORDS

Post by AlexO » January 4, 2024, 10:09 pm

tamada wrote:
January 3, 2024, 12:54 pm
carnaptious
adjective
car·​nap·​tious (ˈ)kär¦napshəs, kərˈn-
dialectal, chiefly Scottish
: bad-tempered

It is most often used to describe someone ill-tempered and grumpy; most likely on the warpath and looking for a fight for very little, if any reason.

Etymologists believe the word may be derived from the verb ‘knap’, meaning to bite or to snap, appropriate enough when you consider the way a person who is said to be ‘carnaptious’ can make you feel.

Normally associated with the elderly, the term has fallen out of use in favour of the milder ‘crabbit,’ which unfortunately doesn’t really convey the same sort of anger.

Francis Begbie, the infamous hardman of Irvine Welsh’s ‘Trainspotting’ novel and portrayed so vividly by Robert Carlyle in the big screen version, is a fine example of a carnaptious soul. Who can forget that violent scene in the pub, where all hell breaks loose when someone has the audacity to knock into Begbie?

Although falling out of popular use, and not nearly as common as it used to be, carnaptious is still a term reserved by some Scots to describe that pent-up, unwavering anger simmering beneath someone’s surface.

https://www.scotsman.com/arts-and-cultu ... us-1589276
Tam
Starting of the 'Hogmanay' as you have done for years.
I have been around for quite a few years now and until your 'Good Wishes' have never heard the term Happy Hogmanay, same as Merry Xmas Eve. If any Scot or others who have ever used the term and could confirm the common use of this form of well-wishing then you will have an apology from me. Until then, stop the waste of bandwidth.

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Re: WORDS

Post by tamada » January 6, 2024, 8:51 am

Since you've had a torrid time in 2023, it was simply an honest wish for a better 2024. It's entirely up to you how to read it of course. An apology is neither required nor expected.

Orrabest.
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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 7, 2024, 1:05 pm

mussy
adjective
UK /ˈmʌs.i/ US /ˈmʌs.i/
Add to word list
untidy:
mussy hair When she returned from her run, her short, mussy hair was plastered to her forehead.
His hair was mussy and looked as if he hadn't combed it before he left.
The garden was mussy, with piles of wood and old machinery everywhere.
Fewer examples
Try to get rid of any mussy edges on the photos.
She brushed a strand of mussy hair off her face.
His hair was mussy and stood up on top of his head.
His cheap, cotton shirt was dirty and mussy.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 10, 2024, 6:26 pm

Alcazar — a Spanish palace or fortress (noun)

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 12, 2024, 7:24 pm

What was a rudis sword used for?

A rudis (plural rudes) was a wooden sword or rod, which was used in Roman gladiator training both against the palus (a post) and for mock combats between sparring partners. It was also given, along with palm branches, to the winner of a gladiatorial battle.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 13, 2024, 10:05 am

swullocking
New Word Suggestion
(dialect) sultry; very hot and humid

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 16, 2024, 10:01 am

Vagas Nerve

The vagal nerves carry signals between your brain, heart and digestive system. They’re a key part of your parasympathetic nervous system. Vagus nerve damage can lead to gastroparesis, food not moving into your intestines. Some people with vasovagal syncope faint from low blood pressure. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can treat epilepsy and depression.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 16, 2024, 1:00 pm

Fan·ci·ful
/ˈfansəf(ə)l/
adjective

1.
(of a person or their thoughts and ideas) overimaginative and unrealistic:
"a fanciful story about a pot of gold"

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 23, 2024, 3:45 pm

NAMASTE
Ask most people in the yoga community to translate “namaste” and the common reply will be something like, “The Divine in me honors the Divine in you.” It’s a lovely sentiment that has inspired many a yoga studio poster. But is it accurate?

“Nama means bow; as means I; and te means you,” says yoga teacher Aadil Palkhivala. “Therefore, namaste literally means ‘bow me you’ or ‘I bow to you.’”

The “Divine in you” interpretation comes from the Hindu belief that God resides in everyone, so any person you greet deserves respect. “The gesture is an acknowledgment of the soul in one by the soul in another,” says Palkhivala, who began studying under B. K. S. Iyengar when he was a child.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 29, 2024, 9:02 pm

What does it mean when a plane rotates?

Pilots say rotate to indicate that the airplane has reached its rotation speed, which is the speed at which the airplane can take off safely without stalling.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » January 30, 2024, 9:25 am

Doodoo wrote:
January 23, 2024, 3:45 pm
NAMASTE
Ask most people in the yoga community to translate “namaste” and the common reply will be something like, “The Divine in me honors the Divine in you.” It’s a lovely sentiment that has inspired many a yoga studio poster. But is it accurate?

“Nama means bow; as means I; and te means you,” says yoga teacher Aadil Palkhivala. “Therefore, namaste literally means ‘bow me you’ or ‘I bow to you.’”

The “Divine in you” interpretation comes from the Hindu belief that God resides in everyone, so any person you greet deserves respect. “The gesture is an acknowledgment of the soul in one by the soul in another,” says Palkhivala, who began studying under B. K. S. Iyengar when he was a child.
Who is B.K.S. lyengar, or do we have to look up that divine person for ourselves?
You only pass through this life once, you don't come back for an encore.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 30, 2024, 10:28 am

Best if the student looks it up so that he/she learns about it rather than being told.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » January 30, 2024, 3:00 pm

Ve·lum

noun

1.
a membrane or membranous structure, typically covering another structure or partly obscuring an opening.

the soft palate.

a membrane, typically bordering a cavity, especially in certain mollusks, medusae, and other invertebrates.

the veil of a toadstool.

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » February 5, 2024, 4:14 pm

Kis·met
noun

1.
destiny; fate:
"what chance did I stand against kismet?"

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » February 8, 2024, 3:35 pm

Tuktuk
Many Countries have a version therefore called something else, but in the end 3 wheels and an engine
First developed in Japan in the 30's

Have a read
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto_rickshaw

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Re: WORDS

Post by Doodoo » February 12, 2024, 1:30 pm

E·ma·ci·at·ed

adjective

1.
abnormally thin or weak, especially because of illness or a lack of food:
"she was so emaciated she could hardly stand"

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