Yes it really happened

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 13, 2021, 1:02 pm

Decal

It doenst take an Einstein to come up with data that says as your workforce increases then the number of people to quit their jobs increases



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Declan MacPherson » October 13, 2021, 2:19 pm

Poopoo,

It does not take an Einstein to copy and paste trivia in a thread called "Yes it really happened."

See what I did there?
"Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil." - Ephesians 6:11

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 13, 2021, 2:30 pm

Thats the reason for this thread INFORMATION

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by stattointhailand » October 13, 2021, 11:44 pm

I suppose the bloomin' PC brigade would get upset nowadays

Romf mkt.png

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 14, 2021, 12:36 am

1

Longest train ride

Origin: Moscow (Russia)
Destination: Vladivostok (Russia)
Distance: 5,772 miles / 9,350 km
Duration: +6 days
Who hasn’t heard of the Trans-Siberian Express? This legendary train ride crosses 7 different time zones and goes through incredibly diverse landscapes. It’s been built by Tsar Alexander III, who had the idea to make Russia more accessible from the West. The train has the colors of the Russian flag and people call it “Rossia”. The train departs every 2 days.

2
WW2 Weapons/Gear
The Owen gun, which was known officially as the Owen machine carbine, was an Australian submachine gun designed by Evelyn Owen in 1939. The Owen was the only entirely Australian-designed and constructed service submachine gun of World War II and was used by the Australian Army from 1943 until the mid-1960s.
The Brodie helmet is a steel combat helmet designed and patented in London in 1915 by John Leopold Brodie. A modified form of it became the Helmet, Steel, Mark I in Britain and the M1917 Helmet in the US. Colloquially, it was called the shrapnel helmet, battle bowler, Tommy helmet, tin hat, and in the United States the doughboy helmet. It was also known as the dishpan hat, tin pan hat, washbasin, battle bowler (when worn by officers), and Kelly helmet. The German Army called it the Salatschüssel (salad bowl).[1] The term Brodie is often misused. It is correctly applied only to the original 1915 Brodie's Steel Helmet, War Office Pattern.
The kukri (English: /ˈkʊkri/)[2] or khukuri (Nepali: खुकुरी, pronounced [kʰukuri]) is a type of machete originating from the Indian subcontinent, and is traditionally associated with the Nepali-speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India. The knife has a distinct recurve in its blade. It serves multiple purposes as a melee weapon and also as a regular cutting tool throughout most of South Asia. The blade has traditionally served the role of a basic utility knife for the Gurkhas. The kukri is the national weapon of Nepal, and consequently is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army. The kukri also sees standard service with various regiments and units within the Indian Army, such as the Assam Rifles, the Kumaon Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles and the various Gorkha regiments. Outside of its native region of South Asia, the kukri also sees service with the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army—a unique regiment that is quite different from the rest of the British Army as it is the only regiment that recruits its soldiers strictly from Nepal; a relationship that has its roots in the times of British colonial rule in India.[3][4] The kukri is the staple weapon of all Gurkha military regiments and units throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".[5] The kukri often appears in Nepalese and Indian Gorkha heraldry and is used in many traditional, Hindu-centric rites such as wedding ceremonies.[6]

There have been, and still are many myths surrounding the kukri since its earliest recorded use in the 7th century—most notably that a traditional custom revolves around the blade in which it must draw blood, owing to its sole purpose as a fighting weapon, before being sheathed. However, they are frequently used as regular utility tools. Extraordinary stories of their use in combat by Gurkhas may contribute to this misconception.[7][8] The kukri, khukri, and kukkri spellings are of Indian English origin,[9][better source needed] with the original Nepalese English spelling being khukuri.[citation needed]

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 15, 2021, 3:50 am

1

Ketchup or catsup is a type of table condiment with a sweet and tangy flavor. The unmodified term ("ketchup") now typically refers to tomato ketchup,[1] although original recipes used egg whites, mushrooms, oysters, grapes, mussels, or walnuts, among other ingredients.[2][3]

Tomato ketchup is made from tomatoes, sugar, and vinegar, with seasonings and spices. The spices and flavors vary, but commonly include onions, allspice, coriander, cloves, cumin, garlic, and mustard, and sometimes include celery, cinnamon, or ginger.[4] The market leader in the United States (60% market share) and the United Kingdom (82%) is Heinz Tomato Ketchup.[5][6] Tomato ketchup is most often used as a condiment to dishes that are usually served hot and may be fried or greasy: french fries and other potatoes, hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken tenders, tater tots, hot sandwiches, meat pies, cooked eggs, and grilled or fried meat. Ketchup is sometimes used as the basis for, or as one ingredient in, other sauces and dressings, and the flavor may be replicated as an additive flavoring for snacks, such as potato chips.

2

The song “Take me out of the ball game” is one of the most popular songs associated with baseball and serves as the sport’s anthem. The song was written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer, who have both never actually been to a baseball game before writing the song. It continues to be one of the most popular songs in the United States, at par with “Happy Birthday” and the country’s national anthem.

The year 1869 marked the first time that a baseball team turned professional. The Cincinnati Red Stockings are widely considered as the first professional baseball team. Eleven other teams turned professional that same year.

In Major League Baseball, special mud is used to rub baseballs before each game to reduce their luster and make them easier to grip as per MLB Rule 4.01(c). This mud comes from a secret location in Jersey.

Atlanta Braves and Toronto Blue Jays manager Bobby Cox has been ejected a record 161 times, the most in MLB history

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 16, 2021, 4:44 am

1

Cheese rolling
Travel magazine Culture Trip calls cheese rolling “England’s strangest sport.” On a holiday Monday afternoon in May, racers gather in Brockworth, Gloucester, to chase a foam replica of a round of double Gloucester cheese down the particularly steep Cooper’s Hill. The replica replaced an actual cheese in 2013 after spectators were injured by the four-kilogram (nine-pound) round. The “cheese” is released with a one-second head start, and the racers bolt down after it. The first person down the hill wins a real cheese and the annual title. While most racers are from the village, the competition has attracted rollers from around the world. It is thought to have originated in the 15th century.


2

Gurning
Gurning competitions, a rural English tradition, turn the art of pulling a face into a competitive sport. Competitors often don a horse collar, or braffin, before presenting their sourest face to the judges. “The competition has rules—including a ban on make-up—though manipulation of false-teeth is allowed for those who have them,” the BBC explains. Gurners take their sport seriously: “I will be practising most of the week just to loosen my face, and... keep improving the faces that I pull,” champion gurner Tommy Mattinson (pictured with the Queen) told the BBC in 2011. No one knows when gurning became a competitive sport, but the earliest competitions seem to have been held at the Egremont Crab Fair in Cumbria, as far back as 1267. The world championships are still held there today.

2

Cricket fighting
In China, the tradition of keeping crickets as pets dates back more than 3,200 years. Many are kept around for their chirping, which is “traditionally regarded as beautiful music.” Others are fighting crickets. “Only male crickets which are raised in the wild can be chosen to fight in the transparent oval-shaped rings, and ones from Shandong Province are regarded as the best fighting breed,” a Reuters story explains. One can buy a fighting cricket for a few dollars, although crickets have gone for as much as 10,000 Chinese Yuan (more than US$1,500) and bets have reached 1,000,000 Chinese Yuan (US$155,000). The fights last just a few seconds and end when the loser runs away or stops chirping. The entire industry is built around animals that only live about 100 days.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 17, 2021, 5:11 am

1

Camel beauty pageants
The Arabian peninsula’s answer to the dog show is the camel beauty pageant. According to Australian public broadcaster ABC, the pageants took off during the 20th-century oil boom, as one-humped dromedary camels became a status symbol. In 2017, an individual Abdul Aziz Camel Festival pageant in Saudi Arabia drew nearly 30,000 competitors. “The winners in six categories each get roughly [AU]$7.5 million [US$5.2 million], along with the crown of ‘Miss Camel’,” ABC explains. Camels are judged on the beauty of their coats, necks, heads (including “pouty and pendulous lips” and long lashes) and humps, with an elegant posture increasing a camel’s chance of winning. In 2018, a dozen camels were disqualified from a Saudi pageant after organizers learned that a veterinarian performed plastic surgery on the animals, injecting Botox and reducing the size of their ears.


2

The giant-vegetable growing circuit
Competitive giant-vegetable growing is a thriving subculture in the UK, which has only grown with a lockdown-induced rise in interest in gardening, according to The Guardian. In 2019, British grower Kevin Fortey set a record for the world’s largest beetroot. Dedicated giant-vegetable growers spend hours each day with their plants, covering giant pumpkins with blankets to reduce the impact of temperature changes or building elaborate support mechanisms for metre-long (three-foot) cucumbers or three-kilogram (seven-pound) tomatoes. British growers show off their successes on the Grow Show tour or at major flower shows—although transporting them from the farm may be the hardest part. In North America, giant-pumpkin competitions are fixtures at fall festivals.

3

It is a myth that dogs are color blind. They can actually see in color, just not as vividly as humans. It is similar to our vision at dusk.

4
Why she came to the worlds stage in 1957 USA Journalists called her "Mutnik"
what was her real name?







ANSWERS

Laika the Russian Space dog

Laika (Russian: Лайка; c. 1954 – 3 November 1957) was a Soviet space dog who became one of the first animals in space, and the first animal to orbit the Earth. Laika, a stray mongrel from the streets of Moscow, was selected to be the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into low orbit on 3 November 1957. No capacity for her recovery and survival was planned, and she died of overheating or asphyxiation shortly before she was to be poisoned.

Little was known about the impact of spaceflight on living creatures at the time of Laika's mission, and the technology to de-orbit had not yet been developed, so Laika's survival was never expected. Some scientists believed humans would be unable to survive the launch or the conditions of outer space, so engineers viewed flights by animals as a necessary precursor to human missions.[1] The experiment aimed to prove that a living passenger could survive being launched into orbit and endure a micro-g environment, paving the way for human spaceflight and providing scientists with some of the first data on how living organisms react to spaceflight environments.

Laika died within hours from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload. The true cause and time of her death were not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six or, as the Soviet government initially claimed, she was euthanised prior to oxygen depletion.

On 11 April 2008, Russian officials unveiled a monument to Laika. A small monument in her honour was built near the military research facility in Moscow that prepared Laika's flight to space. It portrayed a dog standing on top of a rocket. She also appears on the Monument to the Conquerors of Space in Moscow.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 18, 2021, 4:29 am

1

Dogs are about as intelligent as a two-year-old
Studies have shown that dogs can learn over 100 words and gestures, which puts their intelligence and understanding of us on a par with a two year old. However, dogs are much easier to train than a two year old! They’re used for all sorts of jobs, from military roles to assistance dogs, because they’re both clever and extremely loyal animals. To start training your pup the basics, take a look at some top tips from our qualified behaviourist.

Behaviour blog: top training tips for your dog
Certified canine behaviourist Rachel gives her top tips.





2

WORLD'S LARGEST SUNDIAL

The Jantar Mantar is a collection of 19 astronomical instruments built by the Rajput individual Sawai Jai Singh II, the founder of Jaipur, Rajasthan. The monument was completed in 1734.[1][2] It features the world's largest stone sundial, and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.[1][3] It is located near City Palace and Hawa Mahal.[4] The instruments allow the observation of astronomical positions with the naked eye.[1] The observatory is an example of the Ptolemaic positional astronomy which was shared by many civilizations.[1][2]

The monument features instruments operating in each of the three main classical celestial coordinate systems: the horizon-zenith local system, the equatorial system, and the ecliptic system.[2] The Kanmala Yantraprakara is one that works in two systems and allows transformation of the coordinates directly from one system to the other.[5]

The monument was damaged in the 19th century. Early restoration work was undertaken under the supervision of Major Arthur Garrett, a keen amateur astronomer, during his appointment as Assistant State Engineer for the Jaipur District.

3

Best Medical

https://ceoworld.biz/2021/04/27/reveale ... Dtu5-cr5zY

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 19, 2021, 4:40 am

1

POSSIBLE STROKE
You May Have Sudden Numbness or Weakness
You may have sudden numbness or weakness "in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body," says the CDC. "A stroke occurs when blood flow in the brain becomes obstructed. When brain cells become deprived of oxygen-rich blood, they begin to die and lose their functions," according to Flint Rehab. "The area of the brain affected by stroke determines the secondary effects that occur. For example, if the area of the brain that regulates sensation is affected, it may result in impaired sensation like numbness."

You May Have Sudden Confusion or Trouble Speaking
You may also have difficulty understanding speech, says the CDC. This may also be the result of a TIA. "Symptoms of memory loss due to a transient ischemic attack are often temporary and vary depending on the area of the brain affected," says Cedars Sinai. "Short-term memory loss is the most common form of memory loss due to a TIA. Patients experiencing short-term memory loss will have vivid memories from long ago, but will have difficulty remembering the events of the present day."

What to Do if You or Someone You Know May Be Having a Stroke
"Acting F.A.S.T. can help stroke patients get the treatments they desperately need," says the CDC. The stroke treatments that work best are available only if the stroke is recognized and diagnosed within 3 hours of the first symptoms. Stroke patients may not be eligible for these if they don't arrive at the hospital in time. If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and do the following simple test:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

2

Eisoptrophobia
Eisoptrophobia is the fear of mirrors or, more specifically, of seeing your own reflection in a mirror. Looking into a mirror can cause people with eisoptrophobia shame or distress, and can lead to depression, according to a 2014 case study detailing one 55-year-old woman’s 30-year struggle with this phobia.

Myrmecophobia
Myrmecophobia is a fear of ants. The term is usually applied to species of plants that recoil or don’t respond well in the presence of these insects. But research touching on phobias and insect “swarms” suggests that some people are also freaked out by ants. Some experts are also looking at swarm-based fears in order to predict how people may react negatively in the future if they’re surrounded by large numbers of robots. (Seriously.)

Nomophobia
Nomophobia is the fear of being without a smartphone. Of course, this is a relatively new phobia. A recent study from Italy defines its characteristics as feeling “anxious or nervous” at the thought of losing your smartphone, or worrying about losing network coverage or battery power















.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 20, 2021, 6:37 am

The Bren gun was a licensed version of the Czechoslovak ZGB 33 light machine gun which, in turn, was a modified version of the ZB vz. 26, which British Army officials had tested during a firearms service competition in the 1930s. The later Bren gun featured a distinctive top-mounted curved box magazine, conical flash hider, and quick change barrel. The name Bren was derived from Brno, the Czechoslovak city in Moravia, where the Zb vz. 26 was designed (in the Zbrojovka Brno Factory) and Enfield, site of the British Royal Small Arms Factory. The designer was Václav Holek, a gun inventor and design engineer.

In the 1950s, many Bren guns were re-barrelled to accept the 7.62×51mm NATO cartridge and modified to feed from the magazine for the L1 (Commonwealth version of the FN FAL) rifle as the L4 light machine gun. It was replaced in the British Army as the section LMG by the L7 general-purpose machine gun (GPMG), a heavier belt-fed weapon. This was supplemented in the 1980s by the L86 Light Support Weapon firing the 5.56×45mm NATO round, leaving the Bren gun in use only as a pintle mount on some vehicles. The Bren gun was manufactured by Indian Ordnance Factories as the "Gun Machine 7.62mm 1B"[4] before it was discontinued in 2012.

2

How many new words are added to the English language every year?
This means that 5,366 words have been added to the language in the past approximately 7.5 years, or about 715 words per year.


3

How to protect your car/valuables

Keep your valuables out of sight
Leaving your iPhone, laptop or Louis Vuitton bag in full view on the passenger seat is asking for trouble. Take a few minutes to bring your valuables indoors and safely out of sight. If you're not able to bring your valuables in at night, at least lock them in the trunk where they'll be less of a temptation for would-be thieves. Find out 15 more things you should never leave in your car.

Lock your car
It may seem obvious, but many drivers fail to lock their cars, especially when they are in the parking lot at work or parked on a quiet residential street. No matter how low the crime rate is where you live, a thief could be casing the neighbourhood. Get into the habit of locking your car every time you turn the engine off. It may take an extra second to tap that button on your keychain, but it's time well spent. (Here are more car key fob secret uses.)

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 21, 2021, 8:39 am

1

What is the vestibular nerve's purpose

a) Regulating digestion
b) regulating herat rate
c) aiding balance


2

What will outweigh fish in the the worlds oceans by 2050

a) oil rigs
B) plastic
c) boats/ships

3

How many castles are there in Scotland?
two thousand castles



What is the largest estate in Scotland?
By far the biggest of these is Forestry and Land Scotland, which was known until very recently as Forest Enterprise Scotland. It manages more than a million acres of public forest that is said to generate about £395m for the economy every year, largely through timber and tourism.



ANSWERS

1c) aiding balance

2 b) Plastic

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 21, 2021, 9:26 pm

1

Margarine (aka oleomargarine) was first created in 1869 by a French chemist named Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès. It was originally made from beef fat and was intended to be a cheaper and less perishable option to regular butter. Over time, vegetable oils such as cottonseed and soybean oils replaced the animal fats, and by World War I margarine was almost exclusively made from these vegetable oils.

Some people worried that the new-fangled margarine was an unwholesome, adulterated food while others loved its lower price and longer shelf-life. Margarine became even more popular in the 1930s and 1940s during the Depression and World War II because of its cheaper price and a scarcity of butter, and it’s popularity really took off in the second half of the 20th century when it became the trend to shun traditional saturated fats (such as butter and lard) and to use vegetable oil-based products instead.

For more information on the history of margarine, this 19th century pamphlet gives a detailed account of the process used in the manufacture of margarine in the 1880s. (It’s very pro-margarine, though, so keep that in mind!)

2

Costa Rica
Despite being a popular tourist destination, Costa Rica suffers numerous murders every year. In 2018, this Central American country had a homicide rate of 11.3 per 100,000 inhabitants.



South Africa
Homicides have recently been on the rise in South Africa. In 2018, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime recorded 36.4 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants, a figure not seen in a decade. According to a recent police report, drug and alcohol addiction are usually involved, and the murderers often know their victims.



Belize
Belize’s fine sandy beaches are the stuff of dreams. Its criminal mortality rate is less so. In 2017, Belize had a murder rate of 37.8 per 100,000 people, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 23, 2021, 9:59 am

1

Taiga (/ˈtaɪɡə/; Russian: тайга́, IPA: [tɐjˈɡa]; relates to Mongolic[1] and Turkic[2] languages), generally referred to in North America as a boreal forest or snow forest, is a biome characterized by coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces, and larches.

The taiga or boreal forest has been called the world's largest land biome.[3] In North America, it covers most of inland Canada, Alaska, and parts of the northern contiguous United States.[4] In Eurasia, it covers most of Sweden, Finland, much of Russia from Karelia in the west to the Pacific Ocean (including much of Siberia), much of Norway and Estonia, some of the Scottish Highlands,[citation needed] some lowland/coastal areas of Iceland, and areas of northern Kazakhstan, northern Mongolia, and northern Japan (on the island of Hokkaidō).

The main tree species, the length of the growing season and summer temperatures vary across the world. The taiga of North America is mostly spruce, Scandinavian and Finnish taiga consists of a mix of spruce, pines and birch, Russian taiga has spruces, pines and larches depending on the region, while the Eastern Siberian taiga is a vast larch forest.

Taiga in its current form is a relatively recent phenomenon, having only existed for the last 12,000 years since the beginning of the Holocene epoch, covering land that had been mammoth steppe or under the Scandinavian Ice Sheet in Eurasia and under the Laurentide Ice Sheet in North America during the Late Pleistocene.

Although at high elevations taiga grades into alpine tundra through Krummholz, it is not exclusively an alpine biome, and unlike subalpine forest, much of taiga is lowlands.

The term "taiga" is not used consistently by all cultures. In the English language, "boreal forest" is used in the United States and Canada in referring to more southerly regions, while "taiga" is used to describe the more northern, barren areas approaching the tree line and the tundra. Hoffman (1958) discusses the origin of this differential use in North America and how this differentiation distorts established Russian usage.[5]

Climate change is a threat to taiga,[6] and how the carbon dioxide absorbed should be treated by carbon accounting is controversial.

2
Phobias

Ombrophobia
Ombrophobia is the fear of rain. It falls into a category researchers term “natural environment phobias,” which also includes hurricanes (lilapsophobia), snow (chionophobia), cold (cryophobia), and wind (ancraophobia). People with these phobias may be more likely to have some kind of formal weather-related education, which saddles them with “a greater understanding of the potential dangers associated with severe weather,” according to the authors of one recent study.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 24, 2021, 4:09 am

1

Numerophobia
Numerophobia is the fear of numbers, though not in the sense that a person believes giant 1’s or 0’s are hiding under the bed. (Although with all the recent hand-wringing about technology, maybe they should.) Instead, numerophobia usually pops up as a fear of doing math or dealing with numbers. There’s some evidence that numerophobic doctors may ignore new evidence-based best practices because of their aversion to numbers and statistics.

2

British invasion of Iceland





At the start of the war, the UK imposed strict export controls on Icelandic goods, preventing profitable shipments to Germany, as part of its naval blockade. The UK offered assistance to Iceland, seeking co-operation "as a belligerent and an ally", but the Icelandic government refused and reaffirmed its neutrality. The German diplomatic presence in Iceland, along with the island's strategic importance, alarmed the UK government.[2]

After failing to persuade the Icelandic government to join the Allies, the UK invaded on the morning of 10 May 1940. The initial force of 746 Royal Marines commanded by Colonel Robert Sturges disembarked at the capital Reykjavík. Meeting no resistance, the troops moved quickly to disable communication networks, secure strategic locations, and arrest German citizens. Requisitioning local transport, the troops moved to Hvalfjörður, Kaldaðarnes, Sandskeið, and Akranes to secure potential landing areas against the possibility of a German counterattack.

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