Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 2, 2021, 2:11 am

1

The Peoples Temple Agricultural Project, better known by its informal name "Jonestown", was a remote settlement in Guyana, established by the Peoples Temple, a San Francisco-based cult under the leadership of Jim Jones.

The settlement became internationally known when, on November 18, 1978, a total of 918[1][2] people died at the settlement, at the nearby airstrip in Port Kaituma, and at a Temple-run building in Georgetown, Guyana's capital city. The name of the settlement became synonymous with the incidents at those locations.[3]

In total, 909 individuals died in Jonestown,[1] all but two from apparent cyanide poisoning, in an event termed "revolutionary suicide" by Jones and some Peoples Temple members on an audio tape of the event, and in prior recorded discussions. The poisonings in Jonestown followed the murder of five others by Temple members at Port Kaituma, including United States Congressman Leo Ryan, an act that Jones ordered. Four other Temple members committed murder–suicide in Georgetown at Jones' command.
Terms used to describe the deaths in Jonestown and Georgetown evolved over time. Many contemporary media accounts after the events called the deaths a mass suicide.[4][5] In contrast, most sources today refer to the deaths with terms such as mass murder–suicide,[6] a massacre,[7][8] or simply mass murder.[9][10] Seventy or more individuals at Jonestown were injected with poison, and a third of the victims (304) were minors.[11][12] Guards armed with guns and crossbows had been ordered to shoot those who fled the Jonestown pavilion as Jones lobbied for suicide.



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 2, 2021, 9:48 pm

1
Cost of Groceries

Chicago, USA
Monthly minimum: $325

Chicago is the third-most populous city in America after New York and Los Angeles, but its food prices are much lower than the two. For example, on average, a loaf of bread is $0.28 cheaper in Chicago than in New York, and chicken fillets are $0.34 cheaper per 0.15 kg (0.33 lb.) in the Windy City than in the City of Angels. As a result, the monthly recommended minimum amount of money for food per person is a reasonable $325.37.

Zurich, Switzerland
Monthly minimum: $739

Zurich was named one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in in 2020, and a big reason for that was the high cost of food. According to Numbeo, monthly groceries will run you no less than 666 Swiss francs, or roughly US$739. Meats and dairy products are among the more expensive items.

Belgrade, Serbia
Monthly minimum: $154

Eastern Europe is a great place to find a cheap meal, be it at a restaurant, on the street, or in the grocery store. In the Serbian capital of Belgrade, for example, a month’s worth of food will cost you as little as 15,046.34 dinar (US$154). Serbia is famous for its barbecue (or roštilj), such as pljeskavica, a type of Serbian burger made from a spiced meat patty mixed with pork, lamb, and beef

Bangkok, Thailand
Monthly minimum: $248

Bangkok’s Chinatown District (known to locals as Yaowarat) is considered the birthplace of street food, with more than 110,000 food vendors today. As such, the city has a rich history of providing delicious food at affordable prices, and that includes groceries.


London, England
Monthly minimum: $295

For a big city, London’s food prices are surprisingly reasonable, at just £209 (US$295) minimum per month. According to BBC, “Britons spend an average of 8% of their total household expenditure on food to eat at home,” which is less than any other country except for the USA and Singapore. This is partly due to the increase in popularity of discount supermarkets such as Aldi and Lidl, which have made it more difficult for the bigger supermarkets to raise their prices


Toronto, Canada
Monthly minimum: $326

According to the World Economic Forum, Canadians spend just over 9% of their annual household income on food, making it one of only eight countries in the world to spend less than 10%. In Canada’s largest city, for example, the average household income is close to C$100,000 (US$82,000), while the monthly recommended minimum amount of money for food per person is under C$400 (US$326).


2 DANGEROUS JOBS

Logger
This one feels kind of obvious given the massive trees that loggers typically fell, not to mention the fast-moving and ferociously sharp equipment they use to do it. And yet, despite the obvious dangers facing your average logger, the actual statistics surrounding this job are still incredibly shocking.

According to data out of the U.S., an average of 5,650 loggers and lumberjacks perish every year on the job—that’s a staggering 30 times more than any other profession.



President
It’s a job that relatively few people will ever get to experience, but alongside the prestige and power that comes with becoming the President of the United States of America, there is also a fair amount of danger. Only 44 men have had the honour of being Commander in Chief—of those, eight have died in office, which means that the average incumbent has a fatality rate 27 times that of the most dangerous job in the world.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 3, 2021, 10:59 pm

1
Simit is a circular bread, typically encrusted with sesame seeds or, less commonly, poppy, flax or sunflower seeds, found across the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire, and the Middle East. Simit's size, crunch, chewiness, and other characteristics vary slightly by region. It is widely known as Turkish bagel in the United States.
In İzmir, simit is known as gevrek ("crisp"), although it is very similar to the Istanbul variety. Simit in Ankara are smaller and crisper than those of other cities.

2

You lose 80% of your body heat through your head
“Put on a hat or you’ll lose all your body heat!” We all heard this as children. However, it is actually scientifically impossible to lose 80% of our body heat through our heads. We lose heat through our heads when we go outside in the cold simply because the rest of our body is covered in clothing. The same thing would be true if we went out in winter without shoes and socks.

3

You should drink eight glasses of water a day
There is no scientific study proving that we should be drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day to stay healthy (that’s 64 ounces a day). Research, in fact, suggests that women should drink 2.7 litres (91 ounces) of water a day, while men should drink 3.7 litres (125 ounces).



4

Rogerio Ceni’s 131 goals—as a goalkeeper
An exceptional goalkeeper who represented Brazil at two World Cups, Ceni was also very good at taking set pieces. Amassed over a 25-year career, his 131 professional goals are more than double the total of the second-highest-scoring keeper in history, Jose Luis Chilavert.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 3, 2021, 11:00 pm

1
Simit is a circular bread, typically encrusted with sesame seeds or, less commonly, poppy, flax or sunflower seeds, found across the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire, and the Middle East. Simit's size, crunch, chewiness, and other characteristics vary slightly by region. It is widely known as Turkish bagel in the United States.
In İzmir, simit is known as gevrek ("crisp"), although it is very similar to the Istanbul variety. Simit in Ankara are smaller and crisper than those of other cities.

2

You lose 80% of your body heat through your head
“Put on a hat or you’ll lose all your body heat!” We all heard this as children. However, it is actually scientifically impossible to lose 80% of our body heat through our heads. We lose heat through our heads when we go outside in the cold simply because the rest of our body is covered in clothing. The same thing would be true if we went out in winter without shoes and socks.

3

You should drink eight glasses of water a day
There is no scientific study proving that we should be drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day to stay healthy (that’s 64 ounces a day). Research, in fact, suggests that women should drink 2.7 litres (91 ounces) of water a day, while men should drink 3.7 litres (125 ounces).



4

Rogerio Ceni’s 131 goals—as a goalkeeper
An exceptional goalkeeper who represented Brazil at two World Cups, Ceni was also very good at taking set pieces. Amassed over a 25-year career, his 131 professional goals are more than double the total of the second-highest-scoring keeper in history, Jose Luis Chilavert.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 4, 2021, 9:21 pm

1
Byron Nelson’s 11-tournament win streak
To what extent did “Lord Byron” dominate golf in the late 1930s and ’40s? In 1945 he won a record 11 consecutive pro tournaments. Since then, only Tiger Woods has come remotely close, claiming seven straight from 2006 to 2007.


2

Richie McCaw’s 148 Rugby Test matches
After being given the New Zealand captaincy on a permanent basis in 2006, McCaw would go on to lead the All Blacks in a record 110 Tests. He would also claim two Rugby Union World Cups, in 2011 and 2015.




3

The nave (/neɪv/) is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.[1][2] When a church contains side aisles, as in a basilica-type building, the strict definition of the term "nave" is restricted to the central aisle.[1] In a broader, more colloquial sense, the nave includes all areas available for the lay worshippers, including the side-aisles and transepts.[3] Either way, the nave is distinct from the area reserved for the choir and clergy.

4

Prince Charles and Princess Diana
The future individual and the “People’s Princess” tied the knot in 1981 in what became known as the wedding of the century. Back then, the bill came in at US$48 million—but in today’s dollars that’s well over US$137 million. There were 27 wedding cakes, large amounts of security, thousands of flowers, and a wedding gown worth US$125,000 (£90,000).

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » September 4, 2021, 10:24 pm

I think you submitted the same post twice yesterday, Doo Doo. I'm a little disappointed that the membership didn't notice.
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 5, 2021, 8:30 am

No need to be disappointed
If you will note the times of issuance are 10:59PM and the next one is 11:00PM Therefore it was due to a slight of my hand while issuing. A common mistake here on Udonmap

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 5, 2021, 11:30 pm

1

Shahrooz Yazdani, DDS, of Yazdani Family Dentistry, says, “Changing your toothbrush every four months or so is important, particularly if you’ve had a cold in that span because minuscule germs will have developed on the bristles of your brush.” Set a reminder on your phone to help you remember to change yours.

2

A radiometer or roentgenometer is a device for measuring the radiant flux (power) of electromagnetic radiation. Generally, a radiometer is an infrared radiation detector or an ultraviolet detector.[1] Microwave radiometers operate in the microwave wavelengths.

While the term radiometer can refer to any device that measures electromagnetic radiation (e.g. light), the term is often used to refer specifically to a Crookes radiometer ("light-mill"), a device invented in 1873 in which a rotor (having vanes which are dark on one side, and light on the other) in a partial vacuum spins when exposed to light. A common belief (one originally held even by Crookes) is that the momentum of the absorbed light on the black faces makes the radiometer operate. If this were true, however, the radiometer would spin away from the non-black faces, since the photons bouncing off those faces impart more momentum than the photons absorbed on the black faces. Photons do exert radiation pressure on the faces, but those forces are dwarfed by other effects. The currently accepted explanation depends on having just the right degree of vacuum, and relates to the transfer of heat rather than the direct effect of photons. [2][3]

A Nichols radiometer demonstrates photon pressure. It is much more sensitive than the Crookes radiometer and it operates in a complete vacuum, whereas operation of the Crookes radiometer requires an imperfect vacuum.

The MEMS radiometer can operate on the principles of Nichols or Crookes and can operate over a wide spectrum of wavelength and particle energy levels.[4]



3

A glide bomb or stand-off bomb is a standoff weapon with flight control surfaces to give it a flatter, gliding flight path than that of a conventional bomb without such surfaces. This allows it to be released at a distance from the target rather than right over it, allowing a successful attack without the aircraft needing to survive until reaching the target.

World War II-era glide bombs like the German Fritz X and Henschel Hs 293 pioneered the use of remote control systems, allowing the controlling aircraft to direct the bomb to a pinpoint target as a pioneering form of precision-guided munition. Modern systems are generally self-guided or semi-automated, using GPS or laser designators to hit their target.

The term glide bombing does not refer to the use of glide bombs, but a style of shallow-angle dive bombing.[1]

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 6, 2021, 9:33 pm

The One Major Effect of Eating Mustard

Mustard seeds are rich in tons of different nutrients like fiber, magnesium, potassium, and much more! And one major effect of eating mustard is that it also provides you with a quick and easy boost of calcium. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1 teaspoon of mustard contains around 4 milligrams of calcium. Adding a teaspoon—or two—to your sandwich can give your lunch an extra calcium boost.

2

August 26
1971
Bobby Orr signs a five-year contract with the Boston Bruins worth one million dollars, the first million dollar contract in NHL history.

3

A typewriter is a mechanical or electromechanical machine for typing characters. Typically, a typewriter has an array of keys, and each one causes a different single character to be produced on paper by striking an inked ribbon selectively against the paper with a type element. At the end of the nineteenth century, the term 'typewriter' was also applied to a person who used such a device.[1]

The first commercial typewriters were introduced in 1874,[2] but did not become common in offices until after the mid-1880s.[3][where?] The typewriter quickly became an indispensable tool for practically all writing other than personal handwritten correspondence. It was widely used by professional writers, in offices, business correspondence in private homes, and by students preparing written assignments.

Typewriters were a standard fixture in most offices up to the 1980s. Thereafter, they began to be largely supplanted by computers. Nevertheless, typewriters remain common in some parts of the world. In many Indian cities and towns, for example, typewriters are still used, especially in roadside and legal offices due to a lack of continuous, reliable electricity.[4] The QWERTY keyboard layout, developed for typewriters in the 1870s, remains the standard for computer keyboards.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 7, 2021, 8:03 pm

1

A cagoule (French: [kaɡul]), also spelled cagoul, kagoule or kagool, is the British English term for a lightweight (usually without lining), weatherproof raincoat or anorak with a hood, which often comes in knee-length form.[1] The Canadian English equivalent is windbreaker or the French brand K-Way.

In some versions, when rolled up, the hood or cross-chest front pocket doubles as a bag into which the shell can be packed.

2

UK
Lyons Viscount
Lyons Viscount Biscuits are a classic British biscuit which consist of a circular base of biscuit, topped with a creamy mint and covered with a layer of smooth milk chocolate.

HOBNOBS
Hobnobs (sometimes stylized as HobNobs) is the brand name of a commercial biscuit. They are made from rolled oats and jumbo oats, similar to a flapjack-digestive biscuit hybrid, and are among the most popular British biscuits. McVitie's launched Hobnobs in 1985 and a milk chocolate variant in 1987.[1]

They are primarily sold in the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man and Ireland but are available in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and several European and Asian countries (e.g. Taiwan, China, and Hong Kong). In Italy they are now marketed as a variety of digestive biscuit, having previously been known as Suncrok. They were also released in Canada in November 2012, made available in Wal-Mart's British modular section in their food aisles. The McVitie's Hobnob is the third-most popular biscuit in the UK to "dunk" into tea, with its chocolate variant sixth.[2] In 2014 a UK survey declared the Chocolate Hobnob the nation's favourite biscuit
USA
Bizcochito is the official state cookie of New Mexico. Deeply rooted in its history, it was originally invented by the first Spanish colonists of New Mexico as a way of expressing the local culture, customs, and flavors through gastronomy. These crispy cookies consist of butter or lard, sugar, milk, flour, baking powder, and spices such as cinnamon and anise.


As other immigrants started to arrive in New Mexico, they brought their own recipes, and a variety of bizcochitos was created, with the two most popular versions originating from southern and northern New Mexico. The cookies are especially popular during festive events and celebrations such as Christmas and weddings.


Traditionally, they are eaten with coffee or milk in the morning, when their delicate, melt-in-the-mouth texture is best enjoyed.

PEANUT BUTTER
Peanut butter cookie consists of hand-rolled dough that is then flattened with fork tins, giving the cookies their characteristical waffle pattern. It is believed that the dough is marked to help cookies bake more evenly, but some claim it can also be a warning sign to people with peanut allergies.

The dough usually consists of butter, peanut butter, eggs, milk, flour, sugar, and salt. Today, the cookies are so popular that there is even a National Peanut Butter Cookie Day, celebrated on June 12.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Drunk Monkey » September 7, 2021, 8:10 pm

My favourite bisuits were rather boring .. Rich Tea , tho i was partial.to dunking a bourbon or custard cream.in the old days .. jammy dogders n jaffa cakes were for poofs

Never eaten peanut butter so cant comment
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » September 7, 2021, 8:33 pm

HobNobs are the best for shovelling black cherry yogurt into your face. They keep nice & rigid to get a good scoop full
Coordinator for Tesco Lotus Boxing Events, fun times, eh

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » September 8, 2021, 3:11 am

Has anyone played the wet digestive game?
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 8, 2021, 7:14 pm

1
Drinking a cup of coffee a day can reduce the risk of a stroke by a fifth, a new study suggests.

There has been much debate over drinking coffee, with some experts believing it is bad for health but others suggesting it has benefits.

The new study, by researchers at Semmelweis University in Budapest, is one of the largest ever to research the question.

Data on almost half a million Britons obtained from the UK Biobank show people who drank a moderate amount of coffee – defined as anything from half a cup of brown to three cups a day – were 21 per cent less likely to have a stroke than people who avoided coffee completely.

Around 100,000 people in the UK suffer a stroke every year. It is the country's fourth biggest cause of death, killing around 35,000, with only dementia, heart disease and lung cancer claiming more lives.

People drinking a daily cup of brown were also 12 per cent less likely to die from any cause and 17 per cent less likely to die from cardiovascular disease. All the analyses accounted for confounding variables such as age, sex, pre-existing health conditions, weight and diet to ensure that coffee consumption was the only measured factor.

"Our results suggest that regular coffee consumption is safe as even high daily intake was not associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality after a follow-up of 10 to 15 years,” said study author Dr Judit Simon.

"Moreover, 0.5 to three cups of coffee per day was independently associated with lower risks of stroke, death from cardiovascular disease and death from any cause."

The research, presented as an abstract at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2021, also used MRI scans to try and see what it is about coffee that improves a person's long-term health.

"The imaging analysis indicated that, compared with participants who did not drink coffee regularly, daily consumers had healthier sized and better functioning hearts. This was consistent with reversing the detrimental effects of ageing on the heart," said Dr Simon.

"Our findings suggest that coffee consumption of up to three cups per day is associated with favourable cardiovascular outcomes. While further studies are needed to explain the underlying mechanisms, the observed benefits might be partly explained by positive alterations in cardiac structure and function."

2
Common cold
Caused by more than 200 different viruses, nasopharyngitis—or the common cold—affects people of all ages every year. Adults suffer from colds two to four times a year, while children under the age of two can catch up to 10 colds a year.

Touching your face after handling a contaminated object causes the majority of colds. The most common symptoms are fatigue and a congested or runny nose.


The common cold does not usually have any after-effects, but it can sometimes lead to more serious complications. Some people, especially seniors, can develop pneumonia or meningeal syndrome.

3
Flu (influenza)
The virus responsible for the flu is particularly contagious and can live up to 48 hours on surfaces. That means you can catch the flu by simply handling contaminated objects. The same applies if you come into contact with contaminated droplets released into the air by an infected person.

Flu symptoms include fever, sudden cough, sore throat, severe fatigue, headache, and muscle and joint pain, but someone with the flu can be contagious even before symptoms appear. In fact, some patients are contagious up to 24 hours before the first signs become evident.


For certain at-risk individuals, influenza has serious consequences, such as hospitalization and even death.

4
Cholera
Between 1.3 and 4 million cases of cholera are recorded worldwide every year. Without treatment, the disease can be fatal in just a few hours. In fact, between 21,000 and 143,000 deaths are reported each year.

Cholera is extremely contagious in many parts of the world that lack effective water treatment systems. Transmission occurs when an infected person’s stool contaminates water or food intended for human consumption.

Most patients have no symptoms. In severe cases, however, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting can rapidly lead to dehydration.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » September 9, 2021, 2:19 am

Catching a cold twice to four times a year is quite alot, DooDoo.
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 10, 2021, 12:09 am

1

Which gas is a constituent of a common salt
a) Chlorine
b) Oxygen
c) Hydrogen
d) Argon

2
Keppel's father, the Hon. Walter Arnold Crispian Keppel (1914–1996), was a lieutenant commander in the Royal Navy’s Fleet Air Arm. The family moved around, thanks to various naval postings, before settling in London when Keppel was seventeen. She sat A-Levels at St Mary's School, Wantage, and then completed a secretarial course. [3]

Keppel is a granddaughter of Walter Keppel, 9th Earl of Albemarle. Her great-grandfather, the 8th Earl, was the brother of George Keppel and the brother-in-law of Alice Keppel, a mistress of individual Edward VII and the great-great uncle of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall,[4] who is thus her third cousin. Through her grandfather, her ancestors include Eleanor of Aquitaine and Henry II of England, who were the subjects of her one million-pound question on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?.
Keppel appeared on the 20 November 2000 episode of the UK edition of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, becoming the 12th winner in the world and the first in the UK to win one million pounds. At the time, she was a garden designer living in Fulham and was "struggling for money".[8] Nonetheless, she had spent about £100 phoning the quiz show more than 50 times to secure a place.[6] "BT rang me up and said, 'Do you realise your telephone bills are rising?'"[9]

There was speculation at the time that the win was leaked to the press so that ITV would draw ratings away from BBC One which was showing the last episode of One Foot in the Grave in the same timeslot. However, the Independent Television Commission cleared Celador and ITV of the allegations.[10]

Keppel now appears on the Channel 5 quiz show Eggheads, where she and seven other quiz champions (five at a time) are pitted against five members of the public.

3

Did thye ever exsist???
Robin Hood
Robin Hood is the legendary outlaw that is often feature in English folklore and has been a mainstay of literature and films for many years. He is best known for his penchant for stealing from the rich in order to give to the poor. There have been numerous ongoing debates for centuries whether he existed or not, but there has never been concrete evidence for him to have existed.
individual Midas
Most of us have heard of individual Midas who was cursed with the ability to turn anything he touched into gold, giving us the expression the Midas touch. While he most likely existed as a real individual, it is highly unlikely that the story he is known for is historically accurate. It is, however, a great part of Greek mythology.

If anyone NEEDS the link to any story they can PM me












ANSWERS
1
a) Chlorine

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 10, 2021, 8:21 pm

1

Sidle
Definition of sidle
intransitive verb: to go or move with one side foremost especially in a furtive advance



: to cause to move or turn sideways

2

Which is not a quadruped
a) crane
b) cat
c) crocodile
d) chameleon

3

Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly. A flu pandemic from 1957 to 1958 killed around 2 million people worldwide, including some 70,000 people in the United States, and a pandemic from 1968 to 1969 killed approximately 1 million people, including some 34,000 Americans.

4

The origin of the word is uncertain. One theory suggests the name is derived from the "gee-dunk" sound that vending machines made when operated.[citation needed] Another theory is that the term is derived from the comic strip Harold Teen, in which Harold eats Gedunk sundaes at the local soda shop. Navy ships would also then have soda shops rather than bars, as the Navy has been bone-dry afloat since alcohol was banned by Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels in 1911.[3] Yet another theory suggests that the word's origin is from a Chinese word meaning "place of idleness".[2]

The gedunk bar was usually open for longer hours than the mess. Such bars were stocked with a wide variety of consumables such as snacks, soft drinks and fresh coffee. In the 21st century, Sailors and Marines continue to call a place where snacks are for sale a "gedunk bar" or "gedunk machine" and refer to the snacks themselves as "gedunk".

In modern times, the gedunk is usually a spare room or space in a unit's location, where are housed several used refrigerators and miscellaneous shelves to hold cold drinks, snacks, and some gedunks even have coffee pots, hot soup, and occasionally even have barbecues. Items vary in price from $.25 to only a few dollars. Gedunks are stocked by purchasing bulk food items from grocery stores or warehouse stores such as Costco, not items taken from official supply chains. Profits from gedunk sales are minor, but usually go toward unit functions, such as the Marine Ball held traditionally in November.

During the Vietnam War, all who served honorably in the U.S. armed forces were awarded the National Defense Service Medal. Because the medal was issued regardless of any length of service during the specified period (i.e., making it through boot camp), it was called a "Gedunk medal".[4]


ANSWERS
2
a) crane
an animal which has four feet, especially an ungulate mammal:is a quadruped


Again as requested by readers if you would like the links to any story request for your further interest

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 11, 2021, 6:46 pm

1

The Sentinelese, also known as the Sentineli and the North Sentinel Islanders, are an indigenous people who inhabit North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal in the northeastern Indian Ocean. Designated a Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Group and a Scheduled Tribe, they belong to the broader class of Andamanese peoples.

Along with the Great Andamanese, the Jarawas, the Onge, the Shompen, and the Nicobarese, the Sentinelese are one of the six native and often reclusive peoples of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Unlike the others, the Sentinelese appear to have consistently refused any interaction with the outside world. They are hostile to outsiders and have killed people who approached or landed on the island.[1]

In 1956, the Government of India declared North Sentinel Island a tribal reserve and prohibited travel within 3 nautical miles (5.6 kilometres) of it. It further maintains a constant armed patrol to prevent intrusions by outsiders. Photography is prohibited. There is significant uncertainty as to the group's size, with estimates ranging between 15 and 500 individuals, but mostly between 50 and 200.


2

Eating 2 eggs per day

The Vitamin D in eggs is great for your teeth and bones. It not only strengthens them but also helps the body better absorb calcium. It also strengthens teeth and bones. One large egg contains 50 IU vitamin D3 with high concentrations found in the yolk. However, scientists can now increase this concentration. They safely feed the chicken feeds enriched with Vitamin D3. They obtained over 160 times higher vitamin D concentration without affecting the egg quality or taste.

AND

Studies have shown that phospholipids contained in eggs regulate the body’s cholesterol absorption and inflammation. Another study by the University of Eastern Finland showed that eating one egg a day does not cause coronary heart disease. Their findings found that frequent egg consumption does not increase your risk of getting cardiovascular diseases either.

3

ignobly
ig·no·ble
adj.
1. Not noble in quality, character, or purpose; base or dishonorable. See Synonyms at base2.
2. Not of high social status; common.


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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 12, 2021, 8:34 pm

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Dennis Nikrasch (September 12, 1941 – 2010) was a Vegas slot cheater and a former locksmith who was responsible for spearheading the biggest casino theft in Las Vegas history, by grabbing $16,000,000 from rigging slot machines over a 22-year period. His career began in Chicago, Illinois as a locksmith. He then found out that he could break into any lock he wished, due to his extensive knowledge of the tools, and became associated with members from a key Chicago crime family until his arrest in 1961. When he was released in 1970, he realized that he could make even bigger profits by manipulating slot machines in Las Vegas. From 1976 until 1983, he obtained $10 million from this method. He was then found in 1986 and sentenced to five years in prison. He was released in 1991, but didn't return to Vegas headlines until 1996, when he returned, this time with a new approach in response to the higher levels of security. He actually managed to keep his cheating secret until November 1998, when one of his accomplices revealed information about his cheating machines. He was arrested and sentenced to 7.5 years in prison, being released in 2004. He died in 2010 from unknown causes

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Yuzu (Citrus junos, from Japanese 柚子 or ユズ) is a citrus fruit and plant in the family Rutaceae of East Asian origin. Yuzu has been cultivated mainly in East Asia, though recently also in Australia, Spain, Italy and France.[1]

It is believed to have originated in central China as an F1 hybrid of the mangshanyeju subspecies of mandarin orange and the ichang papeda.[2] The yuzu is called yuja (from Korean 유자) in Korean cuisine. Both Japanese yuzu and Korean yuja are borrowings of the kanji/hanja yòuzi (柚子), though this Chinese word now refers to the pomelo due to semantic shift.

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Heinrich Harrer (German: [ˈ 6 July 1912 – 7 January 2006) was an Austrian mountaineer, sportsman, geographer, Oberscharführer in the Schutzstaffel, and author. He was a member of the four-man climbing team that made the first ascent of the North Face of the Eiger, the "last problem" of the Alps. He wrote the books Seven Years in Tibet (1952) and The White Spider (1959)
Aufschnaiter and Harrer, helped by the former's knowledge of the Tibetan language, proceeded to Tibet's capital city, Lhasa, which they reached on 15 January 1946 (six months after the German surrender), having crossed Western Tibet (passing holy Mount Kailash), the South-West with Gyirong County, and the Northern Changthang.

In 1948, Harrer became a salaried official of the Tibetan government, translating foreign news and acting as the Court photographer. Harrer first met the 14th Dalai Lama when he was summoned to the Potala Palace and asked to make a film about ice skating, which Harrer had introduced to Tibet.[7] Harrer built a cinema for him, with a projector run off a Jeep engine. Harrer soon became the Dalai Lama's tutor in English, geography, and some science, and Harrer was astonished at how fast his pupil absorbed the Western world's knowledge.[7] They shared the same birthday and a strong friendship developed between the two that would last the rest of Harrer's life.[9]

In 1952, Harrer returned to Austria where he documented his experiences in the books Seven Years in Tibet (1952) and Lost Lhasa (1953). Seven Years in Tibet was translated into 53 languages, and was a bestseller in the United States in 1954, selling three million copies.[1] The book was the basis of two films of the same title, the first in 1956 and the second in 1997, starring Brad Pitt in the role of Harrer.[10]

In Seven Years in Tibet, Harrer wrote:

Wherever I live, I shall feel homesick for Tibet. I often think I can still hear the cries of wild geese and cranes and the beating of their wings as they fly over Lhasa in the clear, cold moonlight. My heartfelt wish is that my story may create some understanding for a people whose will to live in peace and freedom has won so little sympathy from an indifferent world.

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Doodoo
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Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 15, 2021, 1:09 am

1

AT NUMBER 1, MOST EXPENSIVE HOUSE FOR SALE

Surprise, surprise—the One takes the top spot yet again. Is it complete yet? Nope. But it’s getting close, which begs the question—will the One find a buyer? Frankly, who knows. The specs are certainly there, though. At 100,000 square feet, it’s downright massive, with 20 bedrooms and 30 bathrooms—the primary suite alone is bigger than most New York City condos at 5,500 square feet. The amenities are just as lavish, with not one but five swimming pools, an in-house night club, a six-lane bowling alley and more. (They even tried to put a jellyfish room with aquariums surrounding you on all sides into the place—turns out some things just aren’t meant to be.) It’s a big bet for film producer turned mega-mansion developer Nile Niami, who commissioned renowned Los Angeles architect Paul McClean to design the place seven years ago.

https://robbreport.com/feature/most-exp ... w-2807417/


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What Is a Pip?
Pip is an acronym for "percentage in point" or "price interest point." A pip is the smallest price move that an exchange rate can make based on forex market convention. Most currency pairs are priced out to four decimal places and the pip change is the last (fourth) decimal point. A pip is thus equivalent to 1/100 of 1% or one basis pointor example, the smallest move the USD/CAD currency pair can make is $0.0001 or one basis point.

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Guyana
Suicide Mortality Rate: 40.3

Guyana has the world’s highest suicide rate, four times the world average, which is quite alarming The combination of deep rural poverty, alcohol consumption, and easy access to toxic pesticides appears to be the cause of more than 44 self-inflicted deaths per 100,000 Guyanese per year.


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