Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 12, 2021, 12:26 am

1

The airlines banned from flying to the EU
All airlines from the Democratic Republic of Congo (10 airlines)

All airlines from Armenia (eight airlines)

All airlines from Djibouti (one airline)

All airlines from Sierra Leone (one airline)

All airlines from Equatorial Guinea (two airlines)

2

Battle of Bamber Bridge
Jun 24, 1943 – Jun 25, 1943
On this day in 1943 black American soldiers faced off with white American Military police during World War II on British soil. Yes you read correctly black American soldiers had to fight their own white American soldiers, while in England, where they were fighting for the world.
Why? Because the English town of Bamber Bridge in Lancashire was not segregated so they treated the black soldiers like all other races, aka blacks were free to eat, drink anywhere, BUT back in America segregation of blacks and whites still existed. So essentially the American army went to someone else’s country and demanded they adopted America’s racist practices
So when the American Military police found out that their own black American soldiers were drinking at the same pubs as white people they went in to arrest them. The people in the town got mad about the treatment of the black soldiers and decided to then turn their pubs into “BLACKS ONLY DRINKING PUBS” the very opposite of what was taking place in America with their WHITES ONLY businesses.
Of course this pissed off the American military so guns went blazing, and when word spread back at camp that black soldiers had been shot, scores of men formed a crowd, some carrying rifles and by midnight more American military police arrived with a machine gun-equipped vehicle, so the black soldiers had no choice but to get rifles from British stores while others barricaded themselves back on base, so now it was American white soldiers versus American black soldiers. This lead to the death of one solider, injury of 7, and 32 convictions.
Back in America the battle was hushed up because they didn’t want the country to find out that they were fighting their own soldiers which would anger the black population and weaken the morale in the country.
You may read about the ill treatment of black American soldiers by their own army in the book FORGOTTEN.

3

Edward Vincent Sullivan (September 28, 1901 – October 13, 1974) was an American television personality, impresario,[2] sports and entertainment reporter, and syndicated columnist for the New York Daily News and the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate. He is principally remembered as the creator and host of the television variety program The Toast of the Town, later popularly—and, in 1955, officially—renamed The Ed Sullivan Show. Broadcast for 23 years from 1948 to 1971, it set a record as the longest-running variety show in US broadcast history.[3] "It was, by almost any measure, the last great TV show," said television critic David Hinckley. "It's one of our fondest, dearest pop culture memories."[4]

Sullivan was a broadcasting pioneer at many levels during television's infancy. As TV critic David Bianculli wrote, "Before MTV, Sullivan presented rock acts. Before Bravo, he presented jazz and classical music and theater. Before the Comedy Channel, even before there was the Tonight Show, Sullivan discovered, anointed and popularized young comedians. Before there were 500 channels, before there was cable, Ed Sullivan was where the choice was. From the start, he was indeed 'the Toast of the Town'."[5] In 1996, Sullivan was ranked number 50 on TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time".



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 13, 2021, 12:22 am

1
In Italy who are the Sammarines?

a) Citizens of the Republic of San Mariono
b) Senior Sicilian Maffiosa
c) Roman beat cops
d) Fisherman in the Adriatic

2

Chavy
(Brittish Origin) Someone who thinks that they're really cool but they're really not.
Example 1: "Oh my god Bob is so chavy" "I know right? I though he was shmoom at first but I was wrong.

3

A hangi is a traditional Maori method of cooking food underground using hot stones, and it is commonly practised throughout Aotearoa (New Zealand). The food has warm, earthy tones, and is a firm favorite for social gatherings throughout New Zealand. A hangi involves setting up the pit, heating the stones, preparing the food, and then placing the food into the pit to cook.




ANSWERS

a) Citizens of the Republic of San Mariono

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 14, 2021, 2:03 am

1

Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis, KG, GCB, OM, GCMG, CSI, DSO, MC, CD, PC (Can), PC (10 December 1891 – 16 June 1969),[2] was a senior British Army officer who served with distinction in both the First and the Second World War and, afterwards, as Governor General of Canada and the first Lord Lieutenant of Greater London in 1965.

Alexander was born in London to aristocratic parents and was educated at Harrow before moving on to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, for training as an army officer of the Irish Guards. He rose to prominence through his service in the First World War, receiving numerous honours and decorations, and continued his military career through various British campaigns across Europe and Asia. In the Second World War, Alexander oversaw the final stages of the Allied evacuation from Dunkirk and subsequently held high-ranking field commands in Burma, North Africa and Italy, including serving as Commander-in-Chief Middle East and commanding the 18th Army Group in Tunisia. He then commanded the 15th Army Group for the capture of Sicily and again in Italy before receiving his field marshal's baton and being made Supreme Allied Commander Mediterranean.

In 1946 he was appointed as Governor General of Canada by individual George VI, on the recommendation of Prime Minister of Canada William Lyon Mackenzie individual, to replace the Earl of Athlone as viceroy, and he occupied the post until he was succeeded by Vincent Massey in 1952. Alexander proved to be enthusiastic about the Canadian wilderness and popular with Canadians. He was the last Governor General before Adrienne Clarkson who was not born in Canada as well as the last Governor General to be a peer.

After the end of his viceregal tenure, Alexander was sworn into the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and thereafter,[3] in order to serve as the British Minister of Defence in the Cabinet of Winston Churchill, into the Imperial Privy Council. Alexander retired in 1954 and died in 1969.

2

Adrienne Louise Clarkson PC CC CMM COM CD FRSC(hon) FRAIC(hon) FRCPSC(hon) (Chinese: 伍冰枝; pinyin: Wǔ Bīngzhī; née Poy; born February 10, 1939) is a Hong Kong-born Canadian journalist and stateswoman who served as Governor General of Canada, the 26th since Canadian Confederation.

Clarkson arrived in Canada with her family in 1941, as a refugee from Japanese-occupied Hong Kong, and was raised in Ottawa. After receiving a number of university degrees, Clarkson worked as a producer and broadcaster for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and a journalist for various magazines. Her first diplomatic posting came in the early 1980s, when she promoted Ontarian culture in France and other European countries. In 1999, she was appointed Governor General by Queen Elizabeth II, on the recommendation of Prime Minister of Canada Jean Chrétien, to replace Roméo LeBlanc as viceroy, a post which she occupied until 2005, when she was succeeded by Michaëlle Jean. While Clarkson's appointment as the Canadian vicereine was generally welcomed at first, she caused some controversy during her time serving as the Queen's representative, mostly due to costs incurred in the operation of her office, as well as a somewhat anti-monarchist attitude toward the position.

On October 3, 2005, Clarkson was sworn into the Queen's Privy Council for Canada.[1] She subsequently published her memoirs, founded the Institute for Canadian Citizenship, and became Colonel-in-Chief of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.


3

A sapper, also called pioneer or combat engineer, is a combatant or soldier who performs a variety of military engineering duties, such as breaching fortifications, demolitions, bridge-building, laying or clearing minefields, preparing field defenses, and road and airfield construction and repair. They are also trained to serve as infantry personnel in defensive and offensive operations. A sapper's duties are devoted to tasks involving facilitating movement, defense and survival of allied forces, and impeding those of enemies. The term "sapper" is used in the British Army and Commonwealth nations, the Polish Army and the U.S. military. The word "sapper" comes from the French word sapeur, itself being derived from the verb saper (to undermine, to dig under a wall or building to cause its collapse).

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 15, 2021, 5:32 am

1

Definition of overman
1: a man in authority over others
specifically : FOREMAN

2
Known as the "Australian Mermaid," swimmer Annette Kellerman -- who was born on this day in 1886 -- took the world by storm at the turn of the twentieth century, not just as a skilled long-distance swimmer, but also a daring stunts woman, vaudeville performer, silent movie star, and swimsuit innovator who was once arrested for "indecency" due to her one-piece suit!
Originally a therapy for legs weakened by rickets as a child, swimming became a passion for Kellerman -- but often with a dramatic twist. Dressed as a mermaid, she earned money as a teen by diving into a glass tank of underwater creatures. As a young woman, she swam 26 miles (42 km) of the Thames River – making her the first woman to do so; repeatedly attempted the cross the English Channel (without success, but with no shortage of gumption), and was arrested for indecency in 1907 for wearing a fitted, one-piece bathing suit on Revere Beach near Boston, Massachusetts (in place of the contemporary costume with pantaloons that she considered far too impractical).
In later years, she incorporated theatrics and risky dives into performances throughout the US, including on Hollywood's screens. Always a revolutionary, synchronized swimming is considered the brainchild of the talented Ms. Kellerman, as is the one-piece swimsuit. Her one-piece suit became so popular that it was known as the “Annette Kellerman” and was the first step toward the invention of modern swimwear.
For an excellent picture book about girls and women who refused to take no for an answer and broke barriers in sports of all kinds, we highly recommend "Girls With Guts!" for ages 6 to 9 at https://www.amightygirl.com/girls-with-guts
Annette Kellerman is featured in the inspiring picture book "Shaking Things Up: 14 Young Women Who Changed the World" for ages 5 to 9 at https://www.amightygirl.com/shaking-things-up
For an excellent introduction to 50 pioneering female athletes, we also recommend the illustrated biography "Women in Sports: 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win" for ages 9 and up at https://www.amightygirl.com/women-in-sports
And, for girl-empowering books celebrate the joys and growth that comes with summer, visit our blog post "50 Mighty Girl Books About Summertime Adventure, Growth, & Discovery" at https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=19393

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Today in Mighty Girl history, two young women set off on an incredible journey in 1916 -- sisters Augusta and Adeline Van Buren began the first successful transcontinental motorcycle tour across the U.S. by two women on solo motorcycles. They rode 5,500 miles in 60 days often over unpaved roads while traveling from NYC to Tijuana, Mexico.
The imminent entrance of the U.S. into WWI inspired the sisters' feat as they sought to prove that women could ride as well as men and were capable of serving as military dispatch riders. The women dressed in military-style leggings and leather riding breeches which were taboo at that time for women and, as a result, they were arrested several times along the way for wearing men's clothing. Yet, these two inspirational trailblazers were undaunted. As Augusta famously once stated, “Woman can if she will.”
Following their historic journey, both women continued to be trailblazers -- Adeline went on to earn a law degree at New York University while Augusta became a pilot and joined Amelia Earhart's international women's flying organization the Ninety-Nines. Augusta also became active in the women's rights movement fighting to win women the right to vote.
For two inspiring books about courageous female explorers throughout history, we recommend "Women Explorers: Perils, Pistols, and Petticoats" for ages 7 to 10 (https://www.amightygirl.com/women-explorers) and "The Atlas of Women Explorers" for ages 8 to 13 (https://www.amightygirl.com/the-atlas-o ... -explorers)
For teens and adults, ages 12 and up, we also recommend "A World Of Her Own: 24 Amazing Women Explorers and Adventurers" at https://www.amightygirl.com/a-world-of-her-own
For two uplifting picture books about daring women who broke barriers in transportation, we also recommend "Alice Across America" (https://www.amightygirl.com/alice-across-america) and "Bertha Takes A Drive" (https://www.amightygirl.com/bertha-takes-a-drive), both for ages 5 to 9
And, for more true stories of women adventurers for children and teens, visit our “Explorers & Adventurers” biography section at http://amgrl.co/2maCq4D

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 16, 2021, 12:10 am

1

How many carrots do you need to eat to reap these benefits? One study showed that consuming just 67 grams of carrots a day was linked to a reduced risk of prostate cancer. That's the equivalent of just one medium-sized carrot or half a cup of sliced carrot.

Of course, simply eating carrots isn't enough to reduce your risk of cancer. Many lifestyle habits are linked to cancer, including smoking, alcohol intake, lack of exercise, and a poor diet. Genetics and other health conditions like obesity and diabetes also increase your cancer risk. Adding carrots to your diet is just one way you can reduce your risk of this deadly disease.

2

Prostate Cancer – Symptoms
More advanced versions of prostate cancer can result in problems with urination, blood in the urine or semen, erectile dysfunction, pain specifically in the hips, back or chest, and weakness in the legs or feet. Loss of bladder or bowel control can also be a symptom if the cancer has begun to press on the spinal cord.
Prostate Cancer – PSA Tests
A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test is a method of screening for prostate cancer. In most cases, a PSA level of 4 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less is a sign that prostate cancer is not present. The chances of having prostate cancer are greater as that amount goes up. However, this is not always the case. About 15 per cent of men with a PSA below 4 do have prostate cancer; this result will be found when they undergo a biopsy.

3

A 435-kilometer (250-mile) rail line connecting Tibetan capital Lhasa with the city of Nyingchi entered into service on June 25, giving all 31 provincial-level regions of mainland China access to high-speed train travel.

47 tunnels, 121 bridges
Building a high-speed railroad in Tibet, dubbed the "roof of the world," was no easy feat.

4
Get up happier
Power of Positivity

Power of Positivity
December 20, 2018 08:05Last modified January 15, 2021 09:51
We’re not all morning people. A lot of us wake up grumpy, drowsy, and annoyed with the world for forcing us to get up and get the day going. But it doesn’t have to be this way, even if you’ve never been the kind of person who likes mornings to begin with.

The fact is that getting the day started with a good mood and attitude can work wonders on your daily productivity, activity levels, happiness, and overall behavior. Seriously, you’d be surprised the ways in which a good dose of positive thinking can benefit you for the rest of the day. The best part is that this is totally doable, as outlandish a concept as it seems! Here are some morning habits that will help you wake up in a good mood.

MORNING HABIT THAT HELP YOU WAKE UP IN A GOOD MOOD
1. SET ONE SPECIFIC WAKE-UP TIME – AND STICK TO IT!
By nature, humans are creatures of habit. Set one specific time to wake up every single morning, no matter what time you go to sleep. Whether you’re heading to bed later than usual or right on time, wake up at this set time every morning. And yes, this includes on weekends!
The act of sleeping in on weekends and getting up early on weekdays can actually result in something called sleep inertia, where the brain is still in deep sleep from the weekend schedule when it is jogged awake on weekdays. This will cause important decision-making parts of the brain to experience a delayed wake-up, and this can be very jarring.

It’s important to stick to the wake-up time you set no matter what. It can be very tempting to hit the “snooze” button on your alarm, but snoozing doesn’t give you any of sleep’s benefits anymore. In fact, hitting snooze can cause what is referred to as a cardiovascular assault on the body and lead to severe nervous system upset. So once you hear your alarm, get out of bed and start your day. Your body and brain may need a while to get used to this, but once they do, you’ll be glad.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 17, 2021, 12:02 am

1

There are many kinds of seemingly irrational fears and phobias prevalent in the world. What might be laughing matter to people, is not so to a phobic. Anatidaephobia is one such phobia. A person suffering from this condition feels that somewhere in the world, a duck or a goose is watching him/her (not attacking or touching, simply watching the individual).

The word Anatidaephobia is derived from Greek word ‘Anatidae’ which means ducks, geese or other water fowls, and phobos is Greek for dread/fear.

The fear of ducks phobia can be a debilitating anxiety condition, wherein, no matter what one is doing or where s/he is in the world, they feel the constant presence of a duck or goose.

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Warrant Officer Bert Wipiti - The first Maori pilot in WWII
Bert Sam Wipiti, was born in New Plymouth, NZ on 16 January 1922 and enlisted in the RNZAF in January 1941.
During his flight training at Ohakea, Wipiti become good friends with Charles Kronk, and the two were posted to the RAF's 243 squadron in defense of Singapore later that year, flying the outdated Brewster Buffalo.
Wipiti was the first Māori airman to go overseas for service during WWII.
On 10 January 1942, Wipiti and his mate Charlies Kronk, shot down the first Japanese aircraft, (a Mitsubishi Ki-46), over Singapore. The two traveled to the crash site and cut the tail off the wreckage as a souvenir.
On 21 January, while on a patrol over the Batu Pahat area, he shot down a Zero, and then, the following day, destroyed two Mitsubishi G3M bombers that were part of a raid on No. 243 Squadron's airfield. A few days later, flying escort to several Vickers Vildebeest bombers that were attacking a Japanese convoy of transports, he shot down another Ki-46.
Bert and Charles eventually made their way to Calcutta, where they became part of 67 Squadron, flying Hurricanes.
Unfortunately, on 29 May 1942, Charles Kronk was killed in a flying accident after returning from a routine patrol. He attempted to do a roll above the field but stalled, and crashed into the ground.
In a letter to Kronks mother, Wipiti wrote this about his mate -
“I saw him many times charge into a Jap formation to upset them and usually came back with a bullet-riddled machine. Somehow, I think he enjoyed it. He wasn’t afraid of anything with wings.”
In late March 1942, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal (DFM) in recognition of his service in Malaya and Singapore, having shot down five Japanese aircraft.
While stationed in India, Wipiti encountered racism from the British. As a result of these racist attitudes, his superiors in 67 Squadron had him transferred to England in August 1943, be amongst follow Kiwis in No. 485 New Zealand Squadron flying the Spitfire.
At the time of Wipiti's arrival, No. 485 Squadron was stationed at Biggin Hill, in the English county of Kent, and operating Spitfires on escort missions, accompanying bombers carrying out daylight raids into Continental Europe. Wipiti helped in the destruction of an Fw-190 on 16 September 1943, while covering a raid by Martin Marauder bombers on an airfield in France.
Wipiti was shot down on 3rd October, 1943 over France while escorting a bombing raid on a French power station. At the time of his death, he held the rank of warrant officer. Initially reported as missing he was reported as being presumed dead the following year.
He was 21.

3

Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014) was an American actor and comedian. Known for his improvisational skills[1][2] and the wide variety of characters he created on the spur of the moment and portrayed on film, in dramas and comedies alike,[3][4] he is often regarded as one of the best comedians of all time.[5][6][7] Williams began performing stand-up comedy in San Francisco and Los Angeles during the mid-1970s,[8] and rose to fame playing the alien Mork in the ABC sitcom Mork & Mindy (1978–1982).[9]

After his first starring film role in Popeye (1980), Williams starred in several critically and commercially successful films including The World According to Garp (1982), Moscow on the Hudson (1984), Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), Awakenings (1990), The Fisher individual (1991), Patch Adams (1998), One Hour Photo (2002), and World's Greatest Dad (2009). He also starred in box office successes such as Hook (1991), Aladdin (1992), Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), Jumanji (1995), The Birdcage (1996), Good Will Hunting (1997), and the Night at the Museum trilogy (2006–2014). He was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning Best Supporting Actor for Good Will Hunting. He also received two Primetime Emmy Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and five Grammy Awards.

On August 11, 2014, at age 63, Williams committed suicide at his home in Paradise Cay, California.[10] His widow, Susan Schneider Williams, as well as medical experts and his autopsy, attributed his suicide to his struggle with Lewy body disease.[11]

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 18, 2021, 12:04 am

1

WWII uncovered: Mildred "Micky" Axton Makes Aviation History: First to Pilot the B-29
Mildred "Micky" Axton, of Coffeyville Kansas, earned her pilot's license in 1940 and was the only woman in her class in the Civilian Pilot Training program at Coffeyville Community College in Kansas.
In 1943 Micky joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) 43-W-7 training class. After graduation she was assigned to Pecos Army Airfield Base in Texas. She was one of the first three Women Airforce Service Pilots to be trained as a test pilot as well as a ferry pilot. In 1944 she left the WASP program and went to work at the Boeing Aircraft Plant in Wichita Kansas as a flight test engineer.
According to the Boeing Aircraft Archives: "On May 4, 1944, she was one of the crew of nine aboard "Sweet Sixteen," the 16th of 1,644 B-29s rolled out from the Wichita plant.
"I was back in the aft flight blister when Elton Rowley (chief of engineering flight test) called back over the intercom and said, 'Micky, how'd you like to come and fly this thing?' I was just absolutely in hog heaven!" she recalled.
"So I put my parachute on my back and crawled through the tunnel which was over the bomb bay, to the front. He gave me the left seat and I flew the plane," Axton said. "The problem was, it was all so top secret. I could only tell my husband." Rowley did write a letter, however, verifying her feat. Micky Axton had just made history as the first woman to pilot a B-29" (Boeing Frontiers, May 2006, Volume 5, Issue 1)
"On May 21, 1979, that WASP members received retroactive status as military veterans. During their service, they delivered more than 12,000 aircraft and logged more than 60 million miles in more than 70 types of airplanes, including Douglas and Boeing bombers. Eleven were killed during training and 27 more died during active duty."
"The Commemorative Air Force Jayhawk Wing in Wichita restored a Fairchild PT-19 and renamed it "Miss Micky" to honor Axton." Micky passed away on February 6, 2010 at the age of 91.

2

Operation Mikado was the code name of a military plan by the United Kingdom to use Special Air Service troops to attack the home base of Argentina's five Etendard strike fighters at Río Grande, Tierra del Fuego during the 1982 Falklands War.[1] Brigadier Peter de la Billière,[2] was in charge of planning the operation.

The British Task Force had been successfully attacked by Argentinian aircraft using French Exocet air-to-sea missiles, sinking two ships. This operation was intended to destroy the three remaining Exocet missiles that Argentina had in its possession as well as the Super Étendard launch aircraft. It was also intended to kill the pilots in their quarters.[2] To achieve this, Brigadier Peter de la Billière (Director of the SAS) proposed an operation similar to Operation Entebbe,[3] which consisted of landing 55 SAS soldiers in two Lockheed C-130 Hercules aircraft directly on the runway at Rio Grande.[2]

According to the plan, the C-130s would be kept on the tarmac with engines running while the men of B Squadron SAS performed their mission. If the C-130s survived, then they would head for the Chilean air base at Punta Arenas.[4] If not, the surviving members of the SAS Squadron and aircrew would use whatever transport available on the airfield to make their way to the Chilean border, about 50 miles to their west.

3
bane
noun
1.
a cause of great distress or annoyance:
"the bane of the decorator is the long, narrow hall"

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 19, 2021, 12:01 am

1

Lonnie George Johnson (born October 6, 1949) is an African American inventor, aerospace engineer, and entrepreneur, whose work includes a U.S. Air Force-term of service and a twelve-year stint at NASA, where he worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He invented the Super Soaker water gun in 1989, which has been among the world's bestselling toys ever since.[2] He also invented the Nerf Gun when he patented "a pneumatic launcher for a toy projectile"[3] which revolutionised toy blasters.
Johnson first conceived the Super Soaker while doing work with the U.S. Air Force. Initially called the “Power Drencher” when it first appeared in toy shops in 1990, it eventually got its trademark name after some tweaks and remarketing.[16] Selling between $10 to $60 depending on the model, the Super Soaker took off, generating $200 million in sales in 1991.[2] Shortly after making the deal for the Super Soaker with the Larami Corporation, Larami became a subsidiary of Hasbro Inc. in February 1995.
Johnson tweaked the design of the water gun, replacing the water in the Super Soaker with a "toy [Nerf] projectile." In 1996, Johnson received A U.S. Patent 5553598 A[3] for "Pneumatic launcher for a toy projectile and the like", thus inventing the modern Nerf gun.

In February 2013, Johnson filed suit against Hasbro after he discovered that he was being underpaid royalties for the Super Soaker and several Nerf line of toys.[19] In November 2013, Johnson was awarded nearly $73 million in royalties from Hasbro Inc. in arbitration. According to Hasbro, the Super Soaker is approaching sales of $1 billion.

2
Kim Ung-yong was born on March 8, 1962, in Seoul, South Korea. His father was a physics professor and his mother was a medical professor.[1] By the time he was a year old, Kim had learned both the Korean alphabet and 1,000 Chinese characters by studying the Thousand Character Classic, a 6th-century Chinese poem.[4] At three years old, he was able to solve calculus problems, and he also published a best-selling book of his essays in English and German, as well as his calligraphy and illustrations.[1][unreliable source?] By the age of five, Kim could speak Korean, English, French, German and Japanese.[4] That year, he enrolled at Grant High School in Los Angeles after an article was published about him in Look magazine that caught the attention of the school.[5] He also audited a physics class at Hanyang University.

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LOWER CHOLESTOROL
Oats
Speaking of fiber, the same goes for oats: Eating a hefty bowl of oatmeal in the morning can help lower your cholesterol and keep you full and satisfied until lunch.
Coconut
Eating coconut won't just make you feel like you got transported to a tropical paradise: It also has some major health benefits. One study showed eating the fruit is great at lowering cholesterol levels — even if you just top your salad with some crunchy flakes.
Garlic
Garlic is so easy to cook with that you have no excuse not to do so immediately. "I love adding garlic to stir-fries, grilled veggies like asparagus, and even using it to flavor olive oil," Gorin says. "Research shows the power herb could help reduce total cholesterol levels, so why not give it a try?"

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 20, 2021, 1:54 am

1

Operation Exodus was an Allied operation to repatriate Allied prisoners of war from Europe to Britain in the closing stages of the Second World War.

The operationedit | edit source
Liberated prisoners with an Avro Lancaster of No. 635 Squadron RAF at Lübeck, Germany, 11 May 1945
After the end of hostilities in Europe, orders were received on 2 May 1945 that 300 repatriated prisoners of war were arriving by air at 1100. All arrangements were made for their reception at RAF Oakley, Buckinghamshire, and the provision of refreshments laid on in the Social Club. The arrival was, in fact, postponed to later in the day. Seven Dakotas landed with repatriated POWs on the following day and more throughout the month, until by the end of May, 72 Dakotas had brought 1,787 PoWs. Operation EXODUS was in full swing and May 1945 was even busier with 443 Avro Lancasters, 103 Dakotas, 51 Handley Page Halifaxes, 31 Consolidated B-24 Liberators, 3 Short Stirlings, 3 Lockheed Hudsons, and 2 Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses bringing 15,088 personnel.




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USES OF BAKING SODA
a) Due to its pH and gently abrasive nature, baking soda is effective at removing plaque and whitening your teeth. The simplest way is, after brushing with regular toothpaste, to brush your teeth with a baking soda-water mixture. Leave it on for two minutes and then rinse thoroughly with water.
b) One of my favorite uses for baking soda! Baking soda is a highly effective way to wash your fruits and veggies, especially when trying to remove any harmful chemicals that may or may not be on them. Fill a clean bowl or cleaned and sanitized sink with cold water. Add one teaspoon of baking soda for every two cups of water. Submerge the produce and let them soak for 12 to 15 minutes swishing them around occasionally. Make sure you dry them thoroughly before preparing or storing them.
c) No one likes weeds sticking up through the cracks of their patio. To kill a weed in your garden, first wet the weed a bit with the hose. Then sprinkle one teaspoon of baking soda on the entire weed. This will ensure you kill the weed and nothing else. For the cracks in the pavement, generously sprinkle baking soda on top of the weeds growing out of them. Reapply every four to six weeks if the weeds aren’t completely gone. This method works best in the spring or fall when the weeds are actively growing.
d) Baking soda and vinegar can work wonders for a clogged drain. This works particularly well if it is your kitchen sink and there is an oil or grease build-up. Start by pouring boiling water down the drain. Next, pour down a solution made of one cup of baking soda, one cup of hot water, and one cup of vinegar. Cover with the drain plug and wait five to 10 minutes. It will bubble up a lot – don’t worry, it’s supposed to! This is the baking soda and vinegar working against the clog. Finish by pouring more boiling water down the drain.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 21, 2021, 12:25 am

1

Which country's flag in NOT restcangular

a) Uganda
b) Ceylon
c) Nepal

2

The first coffeehouses that originated in London in the 17th century were called Penny Universities. People would pay a penny to enter and once inside had access to coffee, the company of others, newspapers, bulletins and the latest news and gossip.

Since it only cost a penny to enter, Penny Universities attracted an eclectic group of people, from all social and economic classes. It created a unique environment for the sharing of ideas and conversation.

In Penny Universities, patrons mingled over coffee, rather than alcohol. So, instead of losing a bagillion brain cells, people left feeling more intelligent and enlightened than before they arrived.

3
Staff Sergeant Reckless (c. 1948 – May 13, 1968), a decorated war horse who held official rank in the United States military,[3] was a mare of Mongolian horse breeding. Out of a race horse dam, she was purchased in October 1952 for $250 from a Korean stableboy at the Seoul racetrack who needed money to buy an artificial leg for his sister.[4] Reckless was bought by members of the United States Marine Corps and trained to be a pack horse for the Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Anti-Tank Company, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division.[3] She quickly became part of the unit and was allowed to roam freely through camp, entering the Marines' tents, where she would sleep on cold nights, and was known for her willingness to eat nearly anything, including scrambled eggs, beer, Coca-Cola and, once, about $30 worth of poker chips.

She served in numerous combat actions during the Korean War, carrying supplies and ammunition, and was also used to evacuate wounded. Learning each supply route after only a couple of trips, she often traveled to deliver supplies to the troops on her own, without benefit of a handler. The highlight of her nine-month military career came in late March 1953 during the Battle for Outpost Vegas when, in a single day, she made 51 solo trips to resupply multiple front line units. She was wounded in combat twice, given the battlefield rank of corporal in 1953, and then a battlefield promotion to sergeant in 1954, several months after the war ended. She also became the first horse in the Marine Corps known to have participated in an amphibious landing, and following the war was awarded two Purple Hearts, a Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, was included in her unit's Presidential Unit Citations from two countries, as well as other military honors.

Her wartime service record was featured in The Saturday Evening Post, and LIFE magazine recognized her as one of America's 100 all-time heroes. She was retired and brought to the United States after the war, where she made appearances on television and participated in the United States Marine Corps birthday ball. She was officially promoted to staff sergeant in 1959 by the Commandant of the Marine Corps.[5] She gave birth to four foals in America and died in May 1968. A plaque and photo were dedicated in her honor at the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton stables and a statue of her was dedicated on July 26, 2013 at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, Virginia. On May 12, 2018, a bronze statue of Sergeant Reckless was placed and dedicated in the Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington Kentucky.[6][7]




ANSWERS

c) Nepal
The national flag of Nepal (Nepali: नेपालको झण्डा) is the world's only non-quadrilateral flag that acts as both the state flag and civil flag of a sovereign country.[2] The flag is a simplified combination of two single pennons (or pennants), known as a double-pennon. Its crimson red is the symbol of bravery and it also represents the color of the rhododendron, Nepal's national flower, while the blue border is the color of peace. Until 1962, the flag's emblems, both the sun and the crescent moon, had human faces, but they were removed to modernize the flag.

The current flag was adopted on 16 December 1962, along with the formation of a new constitutional government.[3] It borrows from the original, traditional design,[4] used throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, and is a combination of the two individual pennons used by rival branches of the ruling dynasty.[2]

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 22, 2021, 3:07 am

1

Cigar consumption Early 1900's in the USA some 300 Million cigars per year

A cigar is a rolled bundle of dried and fermented tobacco leaves made to be smoked. Cigars are produced in a variety of sizes and shapes. Since the 20th century, almost all cigars are made of three distinct components: the filler, the binder leaf which holds the filler together, and a wrapper leaf, which is often the highest quality leaf used. Often there will be a cigar band printed with the cigar manufacturer's logo. Modern cigars often come with two bands, especially Cuban Cigar bands, showing Limited Edition (Edición Limitada) bands displaying the year of production.

Cigar tobacco is grown in significant quantities primarily in Central America and the islands of the Caribbean, including Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, and Puerto Rico; it is also produced in the Eastern United States, Brazil and in the Mediterranean countries of Italy and Spain (in the Canary Islands), and in Indonesia and the Philippines of Southeast Asia.

The origins of cigar smoking are unknown. A Mayan ceramic pot from Guatemala dating back to the 10th century depicts people smoking tobacco leaves tied with a string.[citation needed]

Regular cigar smoking is known to carry serious health risks including increased risk of developing various types of cancer and cardiovascular illnesses.

2

There's a big secret hiding in plain sight within the walls of one of America's most beloved fast-food chains. Dairy Queen — purveyors of the legendary Blizzard — doesn't actually sell ice cream.

Wait, what? Dairy Queen doesn't sell ice cream? Technically no. Not according to regulations set by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), anyway.

Those strict FDA guidelines mean Dairy Queen's famous frozen treats can't be classified as ice cream. That's why the chain uses the term "soft serve" instead. While this dessert discovery may be a bombshell to you, Dairy Queen has not only recognized, but also embraced it throughout its 75-year history

It has to do with the content of milk fat. The FDA says to be considered an "ice cream" the product must contain "not less than 10 percent milkfat, nor less than 10 percent nonfat milk solids." Dairy Queen's soft serve, well, just doesn't.

Dairy Queen does a good job of explaining on its website why it doesn't (can't?) use the term ice cream on its menu: "To be categorized as ice cream, the minimum butterfat content must be 10 percent, and our soft serve has only 5 percent butterfat content." And even though the FDA has changed its definition of what qualifies as ice cream over the years, Dairy Queen's soft serve recipe has always stayed the same.

Dairy Queen goes on to say that, while their soft serve contains only 5 percent butterfat, that doesn't mean it is 95 percent fat-free. (Wishful thinking, right?) Regardless of what the chain calls its desserts (Blizzards, Royal, etc.) Dairy Queen is legally obligated to label the frozen stuff inside as something other than ice cream, hence soft serve — a name that's sprinkled (pun intended) with its own controversy.

Both Carvel and DQ claim to have invented the term, but it was former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher who was once believed to be a soft-serve pioneer. After her death in 2013, The New Yorker published an article explaining how the myth began:

The frozen-dessert origin myth goes like this: shortly after graduating from Oxford in 1947 with a degree in chemistry, Margaret Roberts, the future Mrs. Thatcher, worked briefly at the food conglomerate J. Lyons & Company, where she helped devise a method for whipping extra air into ice cream that laid the foundation for modern soft-serve. The innovation spread thanks to Mr. Whippy, a chain of British ice-cream trucks that paved the way for today's hawkers of towering cones pierced with Cadbury Flake bars, and became popular worldwide.
However, The New York Times points back at Dairy Queen founder J.F. McCullough and Carvel founder Tom Carvel as the real pioneers, allegedly seeing their new frozen treat "at a friend's ice cream shop in Kankakee, Illinois... [where] 1,600 people paid 10 cents for all they could eat of his newfangled treat." At the very least, this is one mystery that is worth a taste.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 23, 2021, 1:14 am

Black Currants Banned in USA

The plant disease that deprived Americans from local-grown black currants is called white pine blister dust. It’s caused by a type of fungus (Cronartium ribicola). The disease is deadly to pine trees, and although it was introduced to the US in the early 1900s, the US Forest Service is still trying to eliminate it.

Black currant plants became a vector for this dreadful disease. This means the fungus used them to spread far and wide. The condition is untreatable and hard to manage. The situation has turned so serious that it threatened the existence of US pines. As they are the main element of the logging industry, it must have been dealt with as soon as possible.
Getting black currants banned has been deemed minimally effective for disease prevention. Therefore, some states start reversing the federal ban on this berry. However, Europe still remains the producer of 99% of the world’s black currants stock.
Forcibly removing black currant plants did help slow down the spreading of the disease. However, it’s not a 100% effective method. One of the reasons is that all of the Ribes genus’ plants carry this fungus. Aside from currants, this includes gooseberries and a variety of other species.
Another reason is that the fungus can spread through air to the distance of about 900 feet. It’s also highly resistant to the environment, so it can survive through almost any natural challenge.
Getting black currants banned and creating quarantines (following the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912), helped manage the disease in the past. However, the efforts of researchers now are truly making a difference for the pines.
The most effective solution is to plant white pines in areas devoid of the environment the fungus needs to breed. Those are high grounds with well-drained soil. Researchers are also working on creating species of pines resistant to the infection. Some varieties of European and Asian pines have this innate resistance because they evolved alongside the fungus. However, American trees met this threat too late to develop a workable defense.
What About Black Currants Now
Getting black currants banned has been deemed minimally effective for disease prevention. Therefore, some states start reversing the federal ban on this berry. However, Europe still remains the producer of 99% of the world’s black currants stock.

Today, these plants are successfully grown in New York, Connecticut, Oregon, and Vermont. Yet, the majority of Americans can only enjoy processed or dried berries. It’s not so bad considering the benefits of eating dry fruits. But the deliciously tart taste of fresh berries is mostly ‘lost in transition’.

Black currants are one of the best natural sources of vitamin C. They beat all citrus fruits combined, and during the times of World War II, this berry literally saved thousands of lives in Britain. At that time, transporting fruits to the island was impossible. So, currants were the only food source of this essential nutrient.

Nowadays, Americans are starting to rediscover this wondrous berry. However, there’s a long way to go before it can become a staple in the US diet.

2
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who had one egg a day performed better in cognitive tests than those who didn’t. Harvard Health confirms this by describing eggs as brain food that protects the brain from decline as you age. Mom’s are also encouraged to give babies one egg a day to boost their brain development and function. Choline from the eggs also provides the babies with required nutrients for memory and muscle control.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 23, 2021, 11:45 pm

1

Which President gave a Soviet Premier a Cadillac Eldarado as a gift

a_ Kennedy
b) Nixon
c) Reagan


2

IMMIGRATION

Canada is among the friendliest countries in the world and one of the easiest countries to immigrate to, as well as one of the safest to live in. The scenery is stunning throughout, with great outdoor-living opportunities.

Canada also offers superb healthcare and education, making it ideal for families on the move. Three of Canada’s major cities rank among the most liveable cities in the world, namely Toronto, Vancouver, and Calgary. Also, if you are fond of maple syrup, you have moved to the right country!

The best way to get started with your application begins by using an Immigration agent. Skilled workers get priority in the country. The authorities look at four categories for qualification, These include a qualification in your field of expertise. Plus, working knowledge of English and French, at least one year of full employment records, a job offer in Canada and an ability to adapt to the ways of the country.

3
If you aren’t particularly interested in dams, you might think that the day passes more slowly if you have to spend much time contemplating them. There is, however, a direct correlation between one particular dam and the length of the day. The Three Gorges Dam is so massive that it actually slows the speed at which the earth rotates..

Located near Sandouping, China, the Three Gorges Dam is beyond massive. Completed in 2012 at an estimated cost of $25-37 billion, the dam is constructed of 510,000 tons of steel and concrete. It is 7,661 feet (2,335 meters) long and almost 600 feet (183 meters) high. It spans the Yangtze River and holds back 10.14 trillion gallons (39 trillion kilograms) of water to 575 feet (175 meters) above sea level.

To make room for the project, 140 towns, 13 cities, and 1,600 settlements were destroyed and 1.2 million people were relocated by the Chinese government.

As a result of holding back so much water, the dam has actually had an effect on the earth’s rotation. By displacing the water, it slightly changed the earth’s center of gravity, thereby slowing the amount of time it takes to rotate.

NASA has calculated that the dam adds 0.06 microseconds (six hundredths of a millionth of a second) to the length of the day. If you have had one of those days that just seems to drag on forever, you aren’t imagining things. The Three Gorges Dam is partially responsible.


ANSWERS

b) gave Brezhnev a new 1972

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 25, 2021, 12:17 am

1

A knocker-up, sometimes known as a knocker-upper, was a member of a profession[1] in Britain and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution, when alarm clocks were neither cheap nor reliable. A knocker-up's job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.[2][3] By the 1940s and 1950s, this profession had died out, although it still continued in some pockets of industrial England until the early 1970s.
The knocker-up used a baton or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients' doors or a long and light stick,[5] often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. One 1931 photograph shows a knocker-upper in East London using a pea-shooter.[6] In return for the task, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. Some knocker-uppers would not leave a client's window until they were sure that the client had been awoken, other's simply tapped several times and then moved on.[7]

A knocker-upper would also use a 'snuffer outer' as a tool to rouse the sleeping.[citation needed] This implement was used to put out gas lamps which were lit at dusk and then needed to be extinguished at dawn.
There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was done by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols

Mrs. Molly Moore (daughter of Mrs. Mary Smith, also a knocker-up and the protagonist of a children's picture book by Andrea U'Ren called Mary Smith)[9] claims to have been the last knocker-up to have been employed as such. Both Mary Smith and Molly Moore used a long rubber tube as a peashooter, to shoot dried peas at their client's windows.

In Ferryhill, County Durham, miners' houses had slate boards set into their outside walls onto which the miners would write their shift details in chalk so that the colliery-employed knocker-up could wake them at the correct time. These boards were known as "knocky-up boards" or "wake-up slates".

2

This story has been told in many ways, where locations of where the airfield was and how it was bombed being different but the gist is this:

An enemy decoy airfield, built in occupied Holland, let to a tale that has been told and retold every since by veteran Allied pilots. The German “airfield,” was constructed with meticulous care, made almost entirely of wood. There were wooden hangers, oil tanks, gun emplacements, trucks, and aircraft.

The Germans took so long in building their wooden decoy that Allied photo experts had more than enough time to observe and report it. The day finally came when the decoy was finished, down to the last wooden plank. And early the following morning a lone RAF plane crossed the Channel, came in low, circled the field once, and dropped a large wooden bomb.
Could this story be true? The use of decoy airfields and other make-believe facilities during the Second World War was no legend at all. Both sides tried to fool each other and there is no doubt that the Germans built wooden airplanes and sometimes complete airfields to keep the allies away from the actual airfields. They also painted bomb damage on existing airfields to make them look unusable and spare them from further bombing.
Operation Fortitude was the Allied deception operation to make the Germans believe that the invasion would take place at the Pas the Calais and not at Normandy. An entire fake army group under George S Patton Jr was set up, complete with fake airplanes, tanks and cannons.
decoy sitting on the ground. Two other Messerschmitts are visible in the background. SI A-50270, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Archives.

Still, there are a lot of aspects of the story that make it seem more like an urban myth than reality:
Just as there is strategic value in fooling your enemy, there is also strategic value in allowing your enemy to continue believing he has you fooled even after you’ve caught onto his plans. That’s a considerable advantage to throw away merely for the sake of a minor “up yours” stunt.
The proposed scheme (particularly the version quoted at the top of this page, which states the use of a single plane and bomb) is fraught with possibilities for failure that could easily have rendered it pointless. What if the Germans didn’t see the “bomb” fall from the plane? What if they watched it fall but didn’t know what it was, and it broke into unrecognizable pieces when it hit the ground? What if it landed off-target and the Germans never found it? (And why not send someone along to film the event, thereby greatly increasing its propagandic value?)
The Germans used plenty of real anti aircraft guns around their fake airfields, if the Allies were to bomb one of their fake airfields, they would be received with real anti aircraft fire. If there were no anti aircraft guns around a fake airfield the Allies would quickly surmise something fishy was going on.
Would you risk one or more aircrews to drop a wooden bomb on an airfield just for laughs? Giving the fact that the life expectancy as a (bomber) pilot wasn’t that high, it is highly doubtful that any could be found that would risk real Ack Ack to drop a wooden bomb.

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