Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 6, 2021, 12:44 am

1
In 1939, Finland was attacked by the USSR, a nation with 41 times the population of Finland. During the war the USSR suffered well over half a million casualties (Kruchev stated at one point his estimate was nearly 1 million casualties) compared to Finland’s 70,000 casualties. This represents the most lop-sided casualties of any large scale conflict in history.
In 1941, the military of the United States was smaller than the Romanian military.
There was one incident of chemical warfare being used during WW2. The US military had brought canisters of Mustard Gas into the Italian port of Bari “Just in case” of chemical warfare against Germany. The German Luftwaffe bombed these ships, letting loose the chemical cargo stores. A total of 27 cargo ships were lost and over 2,000 military & civilian casualties resulted. It is unknown just how many people died from the release of chemicals versus how many died from explosions.
During WW2, there were TWO carriers stationed on the great lakes near Michigan. They were used exclusively to train naval pilots on how to land on moving carriers. These carriers were hidden in such secrecy that most people did not know their existence till after the war was over.
2
Sir Norman Joseph Wisdom,[1] OBE[2] (4 February 1915 – 4 October 2010) was an English actor, comedian and singer-songwriter best known for a series of comedy films produced between 1953 and 1966 featuring his hapless onscreen character that was often called Norman Pitkin.[3] He was awarded the 1953 BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles following the release of Trouble in Store, his first film in a lead role.

Wisdom gained celebrity status in lands as far apart as South America, Iran and many Eastern Bloc countries, particularly in Albania where his films were the only ones by Western actors permitted by dictator Enver Hoxha to be shown.[4] Charlie Chaplin once referred to Wisdom as his "favourite clown".[5]

Wisdom later forged a career on Broadway in New York City and as a television actor, winning critical acclaim for his dramatic role of a dying cancer patient in the television play Going Gently in 1981. He toured Australia and South Africa.[3] After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, a hospice was named in his honour.[4] In 1995, he was given the Freedom of the City of London and of Tirana.[4] The same year, he was appointed OBE and was knighted five years later.[4]



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 7, 2021, 1:55 am

1
The U.S. Military Is Missing Six Nuclear Weapons
Not only that, but the US is responsible for at least 32 documented instances of a nuclear weapons accident, known as a "Broken Arrow" in military lingo. These atomic-grade mishaps can involve an accidental launching or detonation, theft, or loss – yep loss – of a nuclear weapon.

February 13, 1950

The first of these unlikely instances occurred in 1950, less than five years after the first atomic bomb was detonated. In a mock nuclear strike against the Soviet Union, a US B-36 bomber en route from Alaska to Texas began to experience engine trouble. An icy landing and stuttering engine meant the landing was going to be near-impossible, so the crew jettisoned the plane’s Mark 4 nuclear bomb over the Pacific. The crew witnessed a flash, a bang, and a sound wave.

The military claim the mock-up bomb was filled with "just" uranium and TNT but no plutonium, so it wasn't capable of a nuclear explosion. Nevertheless, the uranium has never been recovered.

March 10, 1956

On March 10, a Boeing B-47 Stratojet set off from MacDill Air Force Base Florida for a non-stop flight to Morocco with “two nuclear capsules” onboard. The jet was scheduled for its second mid-flight refueling over the Mediterranean Sea, but it never made contact. No trace of the jet or the nuclear material was ever found again.

February 5, 1958

In the early hours of February 5, 1958, a B-47 bomber with a 3,400-kilogram (7,500-pound) Mark 15 nuclear bomb on board accidentally collided with an F-86 aircraft during a simulated combat mission. The battered and bruised bomber attempted to land numerous times, but to no avail. Eventually, they made the decision to jettison the bomb into the mouth of the Savannah River near Savannah, Georgia, to make the landing possible. Luckily for them, the plane successfully landed and the bomb did not detonate. However, it has remained “irretrievably lost” to this day.
January 24, 1961
On January 24, 1961, the wing of a B-52 bomber split apart while on an alert mission above Goldsboro, North Carolina. Onboard were two 24-megaton nuclear bombs. One of these successfully deployed its emergency parachute, while the other fell and crashed to the ground. It's believed the unexploded bomb smashed into farmland around the town, but it has never been recovered. In 2012, North Carolina put up a sign near the supposed crash site to commemorate the incident.
December 5, 1965

An A-4E Skyhawk aircraft loaded with a nuclear weapon rolled off the back off an aircraft carrier, USS Ticonderoga, stationed in the Philippine Sea near Japan. The plane, pilot, and nuclear bomb have never been found.

In 1989, the US eventually admitted their bomb was still laying in the seabed around 128 kilometers (80 miles) from a small Japanese island. Needless to say, the Japanese government and environmental groups were pretty pissed about it.

?, 1968

At some point during the Spring of 1968, the US military lost some kind of nuclear weapon. The Pentagon still keeps information about the incident tightly under wraps. However, some have speculated that the incident refers to the



nuclear-powered Scorpion submarine. In May 1968, the attack submarine went missing along with its 99-strong crew in the Atlantic Ocean after being sent on a secret mission to spy on the Soviet navy. This, however, remains conjecture.

2
Thomas Sturges Watson (born September 4, 1949) is an American professional golfer on the PGA Tour Champions, formerly on the PGA Tour.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Watson was one of the leading golf players in the world, winning eight major championships and heading the PGA Tour money list five times. He was the number one player in the world according to McCormack's World Golf Rankings from 1978 until 1982; in both 1983 and 1984, he was ranked second behind Seve Ballesteros. He also spent 32 weeks in the top 10 of the successor Sony Rankings in their debut in 1986.[2]

Watson is also notable for his longevity: at nearly sixty years of age, and 26 years after his last major championship victory, he led after the second and third rounds of The Open Championship in 2009, but lost in a four-hole playoff. With a chance to win the tournament with par on the 72nd hole, he missed an 8-foot (2.4 m) putt, then lost to Stewart Cink in the playoff.

Several of Watson's major victories came at the expense of Jack Nicklaus, the man he replaced as number one, most notably the 1977 Masters, 1977 Open Championship, and the 1982 U.S. Open. Though his rivalry with Nicklaus was intense, their friendly competitiveness served to increase golf's popularity during the time.

In Watson's illustrious career, his eight major championships include five Open Championships,[3] two Masters titles, and one U.S. Open title. The only major that has eluded him is the PGA Championship; if he had won it would have put him in an elite group of golfing "career grand slam" winners that includes Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, and Tiger Woods. In all, Watson's eight majors ranks sixth on the list of total major championship victories, behind only Nicklaus, Woods, Walter Hagen, Hogan, and Player.

Watson is also regarded as one of the greatest links players of all time, a claim backed up by his five Open Championship victories, his runner-up finishes at the 1984 Open Championship and 2009 Open Championship, and his three Senior British Open Championship titles in his mid-50s (2003, 2005, and 2007).

Watson played on four Ryder Cup teams and captained the American side to victory in 1993 at The Belfry in England. More than twenty years later, Watson again captained the U.S. Team in 2014 in Scotland, this time in a loss.
Streaks[edit]
Watson is the only golfer to score a round of 67 or less in all 4 majors at least once in 5 different decades. His best round in the Masters is a 67. His first 67 came in 1977. Other 67s were scored in the 1980s, 1990s and 2010s. His most recent 67 at Augusta was his opening round in 2010. His US Open low score is a 65. He scored 65 in 1987 and 2003, 66 in 1993 and he first shot 67 in 1975. At the British Open, Watson's low score is a 64 in 1980. 65s were scored in 1977 (twice), 1994 and 2009 (all 65s at the Open were scored at Turnberry). Finally, at the PGA Championship, Watson's low score of the 1970s was a 66 in 1979. In the 1980s he scored a 67 in 1980, 1983, 1985, and 1989. His low PGA score is a 65 in 1993 & 2000.

Watson also sets a record for having a round of 65 or less in at least one of the majors in 4 different decades. 1970s: 1977 British Open (65 in rounds 3 and 4), 1980s: 1980 British Open (64 in round 3), 1990s: 1993 PGA Championship (65 in round 2), and 2000s: 2000 PGA Championship (65 in round 3).

Watson's 67 in the first round at the 2010 Masters also gives him a record to be the only person to have at least one round of 67 or less in any of the four majors in five different decades (1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s).

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 8, 2021, 12:01 am

1
Hendrix performed with a temporary band. The Jimi Hendrix Experience, with which he had recorded three smash albums, had broken up. Hendrix assembled a group he called Gypsy Suns and Rainbows. One of his largest bands, it included two musicians he played with at the start of his career (bassist Billy Cox and guitarist Larry Lee), drummer Mitch Mitchell (who was part of the Experience), and two percussionists. The group performed just twice more before disbanding.
It was the only Hendrix band that included a second guitarist. Larry Lee backed up Hendrix on a number of songs, played some lead on a few numbers, and even sang lead on two songs. Virtually no footage of his solo guitar work has been made public.
It was the only major performance that Hendrix gave in the morning. By 1969, Hendrix was a major star who had earned the traditional headliner's position: playing last. Technical and weather delays caused the festival to stretch into Monday morning. The organizers had given Hendrix the opportunity to go on at midnight, but he opted to be the closer.
Brattin Hendrix chord.jpg
Brattin demonstrating the Hendrix chord alt
Brattin demonstrating the Hendrix chord.
Hendrix did not perform for half a million people. In fact, when he took to the stage at 9 a.m., the crowd, which once numbered 500,000, had dwindled to fewer than 200,000. With the demands of work and school weighing on them, many fans waited just long enough to see Hendrix begin his set, and then departed.
The Woodstock performance had the potential to be a disaster for Hendrix. Recordings of rehearsals and of a performance the band gave before the festival show that they "simply could not play well together," Brattin says. "After listening to those tapes, you would not have guessed that the Woodstock performance would be so good. The credit has to go to Jimi and the strength of his onstage presence."
Hendrix’s Woodstock band showcased black musicians. While the Experience was dominated by white musicians (both his bandmates were white Englishmen), Gypsy Suns and Rainbows featured more black performers (bassist Cox, guitarist Lee, and percussionist Juma Sultan were African American).
The Star Spangled Banner was not played on its own. It was part of a medley lasting over half an hour that included hits like Voodoo Child (Slight Return) and Purple Haze, and an unaccompanied improvisation lasting nearly five minutes. Hendrix performed the national anthem as a solo in the midst of this medley.
It was not the first time Hendrix had performed The Star Spangled Banner. In fact, there are nearly 50 live recordings of Hendrix playing the national anthem, 28 made before Woodstock. They range from about a minute to more than six minutes; the Woodstock version was three minutes and 46 seconds. It was among the best, Brattin says. "And, certainly, no other version is so iconic."
Hendrix performed an encore, a rarity. He almost never performed encores, but at Woodstock, despite the vanishing crowd, he did: Hey Joe, his first hit song.
Hendrix was not supposed to close Woodstock. Steeped in childhood memories of the song, Woodstock organizer Michael Lang wanted Roy Rogers to come on after Hendrix and play Happy Trails. The cowboy crooner declined, and Hendrix stepped in
2
How many lighters are sold in USA per year

a) 100 Million

b) 500 Million

c) 1 Billion

3

WW1
Allied Countries - Losses:

Military Casualties:

5.7 million

Civilian Casualties:

3.67 million

Military Wounded:

12.8 million






Answers

2 C) 1 Billion

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 9, 2021, 1:06 am

1
Sure some Brits may remember the Racer Tom Pryce
Thomas Maldwyn Pryce (11 June 1949 – 5 March 1977) was a British racing driver from Wales known for winning the Brands Hatch Race of Champions, a non-championship Formula One race, in 1975 and for the circumstances surrounding his death. Pryce is the only Welsh driver to have won a Formula One race and is also the only Welshman to lead a Formula One World Championship Grand Prix: two laps of the 1975 British Grand Prix.

Pryce started his career in Formula One with the small Token team, making his only start for them at the 1974 Belgian Grand Prix. Shortly after winning the Formula Three support race for the 1974 Monaco Grand Prix, Pryce joined the Shadow team and scored his first points in Germany in only his fourth race. Pryce later claimed two podium finishes, his first in Austria in 1975 and the second in Brazil a year later. Pryce was considered by his team and most of its contemporaries as a great wet-weather driver.

In his four seasons in the sport with the Shadow team from 1974 to 1977, Pryce was identified as a potential future race winner and future world champion. Although the car was often unreliable and rarely in the points, it was on occasion quick enough to grab headlines.

During the practice session for the 1977 South African Grand Prix, run in wet conditions, Pryce was faster than everyone, including world champion drivers Niki Lauda and James Hunt. During the race, he collided at high speed with a safety marshal, Frederik Jansen van Vuuren, and both men were killed. A memorial to Pryce was unveiled in 2009 in his home town of Ruthin




2

Skateboarding is an action sport originating in the United States that involves riding and performing tricks using a skateboard, as well as a recreational activity, an art form, an entertainment industry job, and a method of transportation.[1][2] Skateboarding has been shaped and influenced by many skateboarders throughout the years. A 2009 report found that the skateboarding market is worth an estimated $4.8 billion in annual revenue, with 11.08 million active skateboarders in the world.[3] In 2016, it was announced that skateboarding will be represented at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, for both male and female teams.[4]

Since the 1970s, skateparks have been constructed specifically for use by skateboarders, freestyle BMXers, aggressive skaters, and very recently, scooters.[5] However, skateboarding has become controversial in areas in which the activity, though legal, has damaged curbs, stoneworks, steps, benches, plazas, and parks.
The first skateboards started with wooden boxes, or boards, with roller skate wheels attached to the bottom. Crate scooters preceded skateboards, having a wooden crate attached to the nose (front of the board), which formed rudimentary handlebars.[7][8][9] The boxes turned into planks, similar to the skateboard decks of today.[1]

Skateboarding, as we know it, was probably born sometime in the late 1940s, or early 1950s,[citation needed] when surfers in California wanted something to do when the waves were flat. This was called "sidewalk surfing" – a new wave of surfing on the sidewalk as the sport of surfing became highly popular. No one knows who made the first board; it seems that several people came up with similar ideas at around the same time. The first manufactured skateboards were ordered by a Los Angeles, California surf shop, meant to be used by surfers in their downtime. The shop owner, Bill Richard, made a deal with the Chicago Roller Skate Company to produce sets of skate wheels, which they attached to square wooden boards. Accordingly, skateboarding was originally denoted "sidewalk surfing" and early skaters emulated surfing style and maneuvers, and performed barefoot.[7][1][10]

By the 1960s a small number of surfing manufacturers in Southern California such as Jack's, Kips', Hobie, Bing's and Makaha started building skateboards that resembled small surfboards, and assembled teams to promote their products. One of the earliest Skateboard exhibitions was sponsored by Makaha's founder, Larry Stevenson, in 1963 and held at the Pier Avenue Junior High School in Hermosa Beach, California.[11][12][13] Some of these same teams of skateboarders were also featured on a television show called "Surf's Up" in 1964, hosted by Stan Richards, that helped promote skateboarding as something new and fun to do.[14]

As the popularity of skateboarding began expanding, the first skateboarding magazine, The Quarterly Skateboarder was published in 1964.[1] John Severson, who published the magazine, wrote in his first editorial:

Today's skateboarders are founders in this sport—they're pioneers—they are the first. There is no history in Skateboarding—its being made now—by you. The sport is being molded and we believe that doing the right thing now will lead to a bright future for the sport. Already, there are storm clouds on the horizon with opponents of the sport talking about ban and restriction.[15]

The magazine only lasted four issues, but resumed publication as Skateboarder in 1975.[15][16][17] The first broadcast of an actual skateboarding competition was the 1965 National Skateboarding Championships, which were held in Anaheim, California and aired on ABC's Wide World of Sports.[18][19] Because skateboarding was a new sport during this time, there were only two original disciplines during competitions: flatland freestyle and slalom downhill racing.[7]

One of the earliest sponsored skateboarders, Patti McGee, was paid by Hobie and Vita Pak to travel around the country to do skateboarding exhibitions and to demonstrate skateboarding safety tips. McGee made the cover of Life magazine.[1][20] in 1965 and was featured on several popular television programs—The Mike Douglas Show, What's My Line? and The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson—which helped make skateboarding even more popular at the time.[21][22][23] Some other well known surfer-style skateboarders of the time were Danny Bearer, Torger Johnson, Bruce Logan, Bill and Mark Richards, Woody Woodward, & Jim Fitzpatrick.

The growth of the sport during this period can also be seen in sales figures for Makaha, which quoted $10 million worth of board sales between 1963 and 1965 (Weyland, 2002:28). By 1966 a variety of sources began to claim that skateboarding was dangerous, resulting in shops being reluctant to sell them, and parents being reluctant to buy them. In 1966 sales had dropped significantly (ibid) and Skateboarder Magazine had stopped publication. The popularity of skateboarding dropped and remained low until the early 1970s.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 10, 2021, 12:38 am

1
How barbers became surgeons
We all know, by watching Sweeney Todd, that barbers got up to some very odd things in the past. From about 1000 AD to well into the 1800s, they were not just hair choppers but well-known surgeons. They'd do everything from pulling teeth to blood letting to castration. But why?
It was in Europe that saw the most organized surgeon-barbers in the world. In the 1500s, Henry VIII even grouped barber-surgeons into guilds and forced them to distinguish themselves from regular surgeons. But barbers became surgeons in different cultures and on different continents. Buddhist monks used barbers as simple surgeons. Egyptian barbers examined and cleaned teeth. Chinese barbers castrated eunuchs - a practice that was emulated in the middle ages when castrati singers were popular.
In the end, barbers became surgeons in early history the same way gun slingers became enforcers in the Old West - they happened to be the people with the right tools and enough experience to use them. The gunslingers had a horse and a gun, and the barbers had a set of knives that they kept sharp and clean, and they had a great deal of practice with them. Since barbers doubled as manicurists, they became adept had digging out hangnails and ingrown nails and hair. They also lanced boils and minor skin irritants. Their knives got them called in to castrate animals, from which castrating humans was relatively similar. They began by checking the mouth for infections and cavities and eventually came to pull teeth and lance infected gums. As their knowledge and skill set was built up, they took on apprentices, who learned similar surgeries by doing.
There were top-level practices that caused qualified physicians to pull out of the trade as well. Some cultures had taboos against interfering physically with the body. The Pope famously banned priests from bloodletting. Meanwhile feudal lords, who imposed justice on their territories, would put doctors to death for malpractice so few were likely to attempt anything as risky as surgery. Few people had the money to pay surgeons, anyway, while barbers were cheap.
It was only in the 1800s that dentists, barbers, and surgeons, were separated as professions. For some time, surgery was thought of as a rather low profession among doctors, since barbers shared it medical men, and so people veered away from it as a subject. As knowledge of anatomy and medical procedure became more precise, more patients began surviving more and more elaborate and dramatic surgeries. As fewer barbers were called upon to perform surgery, that aspect of the profession died out. The last barber-surgeon died in the 1820s.
2
Which country has one time zone
a) China
b) Russia
c) Spain

3
Sales tax tokens were fractional cent devices used to pay sales tax on very small purchases in many American states during the years of the Great Depression. Tax tokens were created as a means for consumers to avoid being "overcharged" by having to pay a full penny tax on purchases of 5 or 10 cents. Issued by private firms, by municipalities, and by twelve state governments, sales tax tokens were generally issued in multiples of 1 mill (1⁄10 cent).
Prior to the coming of World War I in the summer of 1914, only two countries, Mexico and the Philippines, made use of a general sales tax for national finance.[2] Excise tax — a transaction tax on the sale of specific items — was broadly used, however, and the idea of a general sales tax was neither unknown nor obscure to political decision-makers in the United States.

Indeed, in 1921 there was a concerted effort to implement a 1% national sales tax in the USA by attaching it to the 1921 national revenue bill and 1922 legislation providing for a soldiers' bonus.[3] Although the proposals for a national sales tax were defeated by an alliance of farmer and labor interests, the state of West Virginia implemented a 1% sales tax of its own in that same year, using the revenue so generated as a replacement for a corporate income tax.[3] Improving economic conditions throughout that decade of the 1920s would leave West Virginia's use of a sales tax unique among the 48 American states.[3]

In October 1929 the global economic crisis struck the United States. As unemployment skyrocketed, income tax revenue plummeted and defaults on property taxes spiked. Meanwhile, calls for state spending on relief measures for the indigent and the unemployed expanded beyond the states' capabilities.[4] Georgia's early adoption of a sales tax in 1929 was followed by a wave of sales tax adoptions, spurred on by the deep financial crisis.[4] In 1933, 11 more states, including New York, Illinois, California, and Michigan, adopted sales taxes




ANSWERS
a) China Since 1949 only one yet it spans 5 zones

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 11, 2021, 12:53 am

1
Severiano Ballesteros Sota (Spanish pronunciation: [seβeˈɾjano βaʎesˈteɾos]; 9 April 1957 – 7 May 2011) was a Spanish professional golfer, a World No. 1 who was one of the sport's leading figures from the mid-1970s to the mid-1990s. A member of a gifted golfing family, he won 90 international tournaments in his career, including five major championships between 1979 and 1988: the Open Championship three times and the Masters Tournament twice. He gained attention in the golfing world in 1976, when at the age of 19, he finished second at The Open. He played a leading role in the re-emergence of European golf, helping the European Ryder Cup team to five wins both as a player and captain.

Ballesteros won a record 50 European Tour titles.[1] He won at least one European Tour title for 17 consecutive years between 1976 and 1992. His final victory was at the 1995 Peugeot Spanish Open. Largely because of back-related injuries, Ballesteros struggled with his form during the late 1990s. Despite this, he continued to be involved in golf, creating the Seve Trophy and running a golf course design business. Ballesteros eventually retired from competitive professional golf in 2007 because of continued poor form.

In 2008 he was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour. Ballesteros was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award for the second time at the BBC Sports Personality Awards 2009. He was presented with the award at his home in Spain by his compatriot and former Ryder Cup teammate José María Olazábal.

Ballesteros died of brain cancer on 7 May 2011, aged 54.

2
Roberto Durán Samaniego (born June 16, 1951) is a Panamanian former professional boxer who competed from 1968 to 2001. He held world championships in four weight classes: lightweight, welterweight, light middleweight and middleweight, as well as reigns as the undisputed and lineal lightweight champion, and the lineal welterweight champion.[1] He is also the second boxer to have competed over a span of five decades, the first being Jack Johnson. Durán was known as a versatile, technical brawler and pressure fighter, which earned him the nickname of "Manos de Piedra" ("Hands of Stone") for his formidable punching power and excellent defense.

In 2002, Durán was voted by The Ring magazine as the fifth greatest fighter of the last 80 years,[3] while boxing historian Bert Sugar rated him as the eighth greatest fighter of all time. The Associated Press voted him as the best lightweight of the 20th century,[4] with many considering him the greatest lightweight of all time. Durán retired for good in January 2002 at age 50, following a car crash in Argentina in October 2001, after which he had required life saving surgery. He had previously retired in November 1980, June 1984 and August 1998, only to change his mind. Durán ended his career with a professional record of 119 fights, 103 wins, and 70 knockouts. From May 1971 up until his second fight against Sugar Ray Leonard in November 1980, as well as in his fight against Wilfred Benítez in January 1982, Durán was trained by legendary boxing trainer Ray Arcel.

In October 2001, Durán traveled to Argentina to promote a salsa music CD that he had just released. While there, he was involved in a car crash and required life-saving surgery. After that incident, he announced his retirement from boxing at the age of 50.[21]

Announcing his retirement, Durán cited the weight issues of his friend, Argentinian football legend Diego Maradona, as motivation for getting back in shape, stating "as of now, I am exercising so that when the [retirement] honors arrive the people will see me in shape. I don't want to [look] like Maradona did, all fat."[21]

Durán's five world title belts, which he won in four different divisions, were stolen from his house in Panama in 1993 during a robbery allegedly staged by his brother-in-law, who gave them to memorabilia seller Luis González Báez, who stood trial for trying to sell stolen goods. González Báez allegedly sold the belts to undercover FBI agents. He alleged that Durán authorized the sale of the five belts to him during a time that Durán was facing financial trouble. On September 23, 2003, a federal judge in Florida ordered the five belts returned to Durán.

His 70 wins by knockout place him in an exclusive group of boxers who have won 50 or more fights by knockout. He is ranked number 28 on The Ring's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.

On October 14, 2006, Durán was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in Riverside, California,[22] and on June 10, 2007, into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastota, New York.

On June 26, 2020, it was announced on FOX News that Duran was diagnosed with the coronavirus after going to a hospital with common cold symptoms. Duran is undergoing treatment for the disease.[23] Coincidentally, the diagnosis came on the 48th anniversary of Duran's first world title victory against Ken Buchanan, which took place on June 26, 1972. He was released from hospital weeks later.[24]

Today he is the brand ambassador of Panama Blue, Panama's premium bottled water.[25]

Duran is a licensed ultralight aircraft pilot in Panama. He flew a Quick Silver MX model.[26]

Duran's daughter, Irichelle Duran, was a professional boxer herself who garnered a record of 1 win and 2 losses in 3 bouts, with 1 win by knockout. She is a resident of Puerto Rico.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 12, 2021, 5:22 am

1

Which Motor Race was held first

1) Monaco Grand Prix
2) Isle of Man TT
3) Les Mans 24 Hour
4) Indy 500

2
Which 2 countries still have not signed the Peace Treaty for WW2

1) Russia and Japan
2) Canada and Austria
3) Germany and France

3
What was the name of the first spacecraft to carry a man to space

1) Lunar
2) Soyuz
3) Vostok
4) Venera

4
Which of these UK Prime Ministers never served as Foreign Minister

1) Winsron Churchill
2) Anthony Eden
3) Harold MacMillian
4) Alec Douglas Home


n


ANSWERS

1
First Year Race started
1) Monaco Grand Prix 1929
2) Isle of Man TT 1907
3) Les Mans 24 Hour 1923
4) Indy 500 1911


2

1) Russia and Japan are still not settled on the ownership of the Kuril Islands

3

3) Vostok

4

1) Winston Churchill

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 14, 2021, 2:02 am

1

What does "STERNUTATION" refer to

a) Make a wish
b) Knock on wood
c) Bless you
d) Congratulations

2

Who appeared in the most Alfred Hitchcock movies

a) Grace Kelley
b) Tippi Hedren
C) Janet Leigh
d) Kim Novak

3
If a Doctor is injecting you with Pitocin you are

a) giving birth
b) hungover
c) passing a kidney stone
e) getting a nose job

4
For all you STUDS out there

In 2020 the New York Post reported that some users of a popular erectile dysfuction medication were experienceing what?

a) Blue vision
b) Cured baldness
c) Urged to gamble
c) started to speak in an Italian accent






ANSWERS
1
b) Bless you

2
a) Grace Kelley

3
a) giving birth

4
a) Blue vision

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 15, 2021, 12:01 am

1

GOLD
One ounce of gold can produce 50 miles fo wire OR
100 square foot sheet if steam rolled out

2
World Factbook
The World Factbook, also known as the CIA World Factbook,[1] is a reference resource produced by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. The official print version is available from the Government Printing Office. Other companies—such as Skyhorse Publishing—also print a paper edition. The Factbook is available in the form of a website that is partially updated every week. It is also available for download for use off-line. It provides a two- to three-page summary of the demographics, geography, communications, government, economy, and military of each of 267 international entities[2] including U.S.-recognized countries, dependencies, and other areas in the world.

The World Factbook is prepared by the CIA for the use of U.S. government officials, and its style, format, coverage, and content are primarily designed to meet their requirements.[3] However, it is frequently used as a resource for academic research papers and news articles.[4] As a work of the U.S. government, it is in the public domain in the United States.

3
Japan (Japanese: 日本, Nippon [ɲippoꜜɴ] (About this soundlisten) or Nihon [ɲihoꜜɴ] (About this soundlisten)) is an island country in East Asia, located in the northwest Pacific Ocean. It is bordered on the west by the Sea of Japan, and extends from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north toward the East China Sea and Taiwan in the south. Part of the Ring of Fire, Japan spans an archipelago of 6852 islands covering 377,975 square kilometers (145,937 sq mi); the five main islands are Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu, and Okinawa. Tokyo is Japan's capital and largest city; other major cities include Yokohama, Osaka, Nagoya, Sapporo, Fukuoka, Kobe, and Kyoto.

Japan is the eleventh-most populous country in the world, as well as one of the most densely populated and urbanized. About three-fourths of the country's terrain is mountainous, concentrating its population of 125.36 million on narrow coastal plains. Japan is divided into 47 administrative prefectures and eight traditional regions. The Greater Tokyo Area is the most populous metropolitan area in the world, with more than 37.4 million residents.

Japan has been inhabited since the Upper Paleolithic period (30,000 BC), though the first written mention of the archipelago appears in a Chinese chronicle finished in the 2nd century AD. Between the 4th and 9th centuries, the kingdoms of Japan became unified under an emperor and the imperial court based in Heian-kyō. Beginning in the 12th century, political power was held by a series of military dictators (shōgun) and feudal lords (daimyō), and enforced by a class of warrior nobility (samurai). After a century-long period of civil war, the country was reunified in 1603 under the Tokugawa shogunate, which enacted an isolationist foreign policy. In 1854, a United States fleet forced Japan to open trade to the West, which led to the end of the shogunate and the restoration of imperial power in 1868. In the Meiji period, the Empire of Japan adopted a Western-modeled constitution and pursued a program of industrialization and modernization. In 1937, Japan invaded China; in 1941, it entered World War II as an Axis power. After suffering defeat in the Pacific War and two atomic bombings, Japan surrendered in 1945 and came under a seven-year Allied occupation, during which it adopted a new constitution. Under the 1947 constitution, Japan has maintained a unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy with a bicameral legislature, the National Diet.

Japan is a great power and a member of numerous international organizations, including the United Nations (since 1956), the OECD, and the Group of Seven. Although it has renounced its right to declare war, the country maintains Self-Defense Forces that rank as one of the world's strongest militaries. After World War II, Japan experienced record growth in an economic miracle, becoming the second-largest economy in the world by 1990. As of 2021, the country's economy is the third-largest by nominal GDP and the fourth-largest by PPP. A global leader in the automotive and electronics industries, Japan has made significant contributions to science and technology. Ranked "very high" on the Human Development Index, Japan has the world's highest life expectancy, though it is experiencing a decline in population. The culture of Japan is well known around the world, including its art, cuisine, music, and popular culture, which encompasses prominent animation and video game industries.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 16, 2021, 12:32 am

1

Bdelloidea /ˈdɛlɔɪdiə/ (Greek βδελλα, bdella, "leech") is a class of rotifers found in freshwater habitats all over the world. There are over 450 described species of bdelloid rotifers (or 'bdelloids'),[1] distinguished from each other mainly on the basis of morphology.[2] The main characteristics that distinguish bdelloids from related groups of rotifers are exclusively parthenogenetic reproduction and the ability to survive in dry, harsh environments by entering a state of desiccation-induced dormancy (anhydrobiosis) at any life stage.[3] They are often referred to as "ancient asexuals" due to their unique asexual history that spans back to over 25 million years ago through fossil evidence.[4] Bdelloid rotifers are microscopic organisms, typically between 150 and 700 µm in length.[3] Most are slightly too small to be seen with the naked eye, but appear as tiny white dots through even a weak hand lens, especially in bright light. In June 2021, biologists reported the restoration of bdelloid rotifers after being frozen for 24,000 years in the Siberian permafrost.

2

Where is the Oort Cloud?

a) in the Brain
b) Over the North Pole
c) In Cyber Space
d) at the edge of the Solar System


ANSWERS

2
D) the Oort Cloud
The Oort cloud (/ɔːrt, ʊərt/),[1] sometimes called the Öpik–Oort cloud,[2] first described in 1950 by Dutch astronomer Jan Oort,[3] is a theoretical[4] concept of a cloud of predominantly icy planetesimals proposed to surround the Sun at distances ranging from 2,000 to 200,000 au (0.03 to 3.2 light-years).[note 1][5] It is divided into two regions: a disc-shaped inner Oort cloud (or Hills cloud) and a spherical outer Oort cloud. Both regions lie beyond the heliosphere and in interstellar space.[5][6] The Kuiper belt and the scattered disc, the other two reservoirs of trans-Neptunian objects, are less than one thousandth as far from the Sun as the Oort cloud.

The outer limit of the Oort cloud defines the cosmographic boundary of the Solar System and the extent of the Sun's Hill sphere.[7] The outer Oort cloud is only loosely bound to the Solar System, and thus is easily affected by the gravitational pull both of passing stars and of the Milky Way itself. These forces occasionally dislodge comets from their orbits within the cloud and send them toward the inner Solar System.[5] Based on their orbits, most of the short-period comets may come from the scattered disc, but some short-period comets may have originated from the Oort cloud.[5][8]

Astronomers conjecture that the matter composing the Oort cloud formed closer to the Sun and was scattered far into space by the gravitational effects of the giant planets early in the Solar System's evolution.[5] Although no confirmed direct observations of the Oort cloud have been made, it may be the source that replenishes most long-period and Halley-type comets entering the inner Solar System, and many of the centaurs and Jupiter-family comets as well.

3
THe first headlight system for cars was when?

a) 1908

b)1898

c)1918

ANSWERS

3

B) 1898 Before electricle headlights where powered by acetylene and oil

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 17, 2021, 5:54 am

1

Henry Warren Beatty[a] (born Beaty; born March 30, 1937) is an American actor, director, producer and screenwriter whose career spans over six decades. He has been nominated for 15 Academy Awards, including four for Best Actor, four for Best Picture, two for Best Director, three for Original Screenplay, and one for Adapted Screenplay – winning Best Director for Reds (1981). Beatty is the only person to have been nominated for acting in, directing, writing, and producing the same film, and he did so twice: first for Heaven Can Wait (with Buck Henry as co-director), and again with Reds.

Eight of the films he has produced have earned 53 Academy nominations, and in 1999, he was awarded the Academy's highest honor, the Irving G. Thalberg Award. Beatty has been nominated for 18 Golden Globe Awards, winning six, including the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, which he was honored with in 2007. Among his Golden Globe–nominated films are Splendor in the Grass (1961), his screen debut, and Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), Dick Tracy (1990), Bugsy (1991), Bulworth (1998) and Rules Don't Apply (2016), all of which he also produced.

Director and collaborator Arthur Penn described Beatty as "the perfect producer", adding, "He makes everyone demand the best of themselves. Warren stays with a picture through editing, mixing and scoring. He plain works harder than anyone else I have ever seen."[8] Beatty's films often have a left-leaning political message. Praising Bulworth, Patricia J. Williams said: “[Beatty] knows power... and this movie is effective precisely because it takes on the issue of power."[9]

With Bonnie & Clyde, Beatty helped to usher in New Hollywood – a movement in American film history from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, when a new generation of young filmmakers came to prominence in the United States.[10]


2

Misophonia is a disorder of decreased tolerance to specific sounds or their associated stimuli that has been characterized using different language and methodologies.[4] Reactions to trigger sounds range from anger and annoyance to activating a fight-or-flight response.[5] The condition is sometimes called selective sound sensitivity syndrome. Common triggers include oral sounds (e.g., loud breathing, chewing, swallowing), clicking sounds (e.g., keyboard tapping, finger tapping, windshield wipers), and sounds associated with movement (e.g., fidgeting).[5] Oftentimes, hated sounds are repetitive in nature.

Although the condition was first proposed in 2001 by Jastreboff and Jastreboff,[6] it has yet to be considered a diagnosable condition.[5] Misophonia is not classified as an auditory or psychiatric condition, and so is different from phonophobia (fear of sound); there are no standard diagnostic criteria, and there is little research on how common it is or the treatment.[5] Proponents suggest misophonia can adversely affect the ability to achieve life goals and to enjoy social situations. As of 2019 there were no evidence-based methods to manage the condition.



2

6 to 9 Billion sold each year

A condom is a sheath-shaped barrier device used during sexual intercourse to reduce the probability of pregnancy or a sexually transmitted infection (STI).[1] There are both male and female condoms.[5] With proper use—and use at every act of intercourse—women whose partners use male condoms experience a 2% per-year pregnancy rate.[1] With typical use the rate of pregnancy is 18% per-year.[6] Their use greatly decreases the risk of gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis, hepatitis B, and HIV/AIDS.[1] To a lesser extent, they also protect against genital herpes, human papillomavirus (HPV), and syphilis.[1]

The male condom is rolled onto an erect penis before intercourse and works by forming a physical barrier which blocks semen from entering the body of a sexual partner.[1][7] Male condoms are typically made from latex and, less commonly, from polyurethane, polyisoprene, or lamb intestine.[1] Male condoms have the advantages of ease of use, easy to access, and few side effects.[1] Men with a latex allergy should use condoms made from a material other than latex, such as polyurethane.[1] Female condoms are typically made from polyurethane and may be used multiple times.[7]

Condoms as a method of preventing STIs have been used since at least 1564.[1] Rubber condoms became available in 1855, followed by latex condoms in the 1920s.[2][3] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines.[8] In the United States condoms usually cost less than US$1.00.[9] As of 2019, globally around 21% of those using birth control use the condom, making it the second-most common method after female sterilization (24%).[10] Rates of condom use are highest in East and Southeast Asia, Europe and North America.[10] About six to nine billion are sold a year.[11]

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 18, 2021, 5:49 am

1

What do Italians do on New Years Eve for good luck


a) drink wine out of a boot
b) kiss a donkey
c) wear red underwear
d) put money in a freezer

2

Before the Wright Brothers built airplanes they did what

a) repaired clocks
b) Built bicycles
c) sold and repaired eyeglasses
d) sold and repaird mining headlamps

3

Lampredotto (Italian pronunciation: [lampreˈdɔtto]) is a typical Florentine dish, made from the fourth and final stomach of a cow, the abomasum.[1]

"Lampredotto" is derived from the Italian word for lamprey eels, lampreda, as the tripe resembles a lamprey in shape and color.[2]

A sandwich with lampredotto—panino co i' lampredotto—has been described as a "classic Florentine" sandwich[1] and is a traditional regional street food in Florence.[3] Lampredotto is typically slow-cooked in a vegetable broth, seasoned with herbs, chopped,[1] and served in a bread roll.[3] It is often topped with a spicy sauce or a green sauce (salsa verde).[1][3]

The Daily Meal has called lampredotto "a tripe-lover's dream."



ANSWERS

1c) wear red underwear


2 b) bicylces

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 19, 2021, 12:32 am

1

Juliane Koepcke (born 10 October 1954), also known by her married name Juliane Diller, is a German Peruvian mammalogist.

As a teenager in 1971, Koepcke was the sole survivor of the LANSA Flight 508 plane crash, then survived ten days alone in the Amazon rainforest. She survived a fall of 3,000 meters (9,843 feet), still strapped to her seat.
Koepcke was about to graduate from high school. Her mother Maria had wanted to return to Panguana with her daughter on 19 or 20 December 1971, but Koepcke wished to attend her graduation ceremony in Lima on 23 December. Maria agreed for Koepcke to stay longer and instead they scheduled a flight on Christmas Eve. All flights were booked, aside from one with Líneas Aéreas Nacionales S.A. (LANSA). Her father Hans-Wilhelm urged his wife to avoid flying with the airline, which had a poor reputation.[1] They booked the flight, nonetheless.

The LANSA Lockheed L-188 Electra OB-R-941 commercial airliner was struck by lightning during a severe thunderstorm and broke-up in mid-air, disintegrating 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) above the ground. Koepcke, still strapped onto her seat, survived the fall to earth, suffering a broken collarbone, a gash to her left leg and her right arm, and her right eye was swollen shut.[2] "I was definitely strapped in it [the airplane seat] when I fell," she said later. "It must have turned and buffered the crash; otherwise I wouldn't have survived."[3] Koepcke's first priority was to find her mother, who had been seated next to her, but her search proved unsuccessful. She would later learn that her mother initially had survived the crash also, only to die of her injuries a few days later.[4]

Surviving on sweets she found at the site, Koepcke waded downstream through knee-high water, as her father had taught her that tracking downstream should eventually lead to civilization.[2] After ten days, she found a boat moored near a small shelter.[5] She poured gasoline from the fuel tank on her wounds to clear them of maggots and spent the night in the shelter.[4] Koepcke said: "I remained there but I wanted to leave. I didn't want to take the boat because I didn't want to steal it."[6] The next morning, a small group of local fishermen discovered her and brought her to their village.[7] The following day, a local pilot volunteered to fly her to a hospital in Pucallpa,[8] where she was reunited with her father.[9]

After recovering from her injuries Koepcke assisted search parties in locating the crash site and recovering the bodies of victims. Her mother's body was discovered on 12 January 1972.

2

The Mir mine (Russian: кимберлитовая алмазная трубка «Мир» kimberlitovaya almaznaya trubka "Mir"; English: kimberlite diamond pipe "Peace"), also called the Mirny mine, is an open pit diamond mine located in Mirny, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian region of eastern Russia. The mine is more than 525 meters (1,722 ft) deep (4th in the world), has a diameter of 1,200 m (3,900 ft),[1] and is one of the largest excavated holes in the world.

Open-pit mining began in 1957 and was discontinued in 2001. Since 2009, it has been active as an underground diamond mine.
The Mir mine was the first developed and the largest diamond mine in the Soviet Union.[9] Its surface operation lasted 44 years, finally closing in June 2001.[8] After the collapse of the USSR, in the 1990s, the mine was operated by the Sakha diamond company, which reported annual profits in excess of $600 million[clarification needed] from diamond sales.[10]

Later, the mine was operated by Alrosa, the largest diamond producing company in Russia, and employed 3,600 workers. It had long been anticipated that the recovery of diamonds by conventional surface mining would end. Therefore, in the 1970s construction of a network of tunnels for underground diamond recovery began. By 1999, the project operated exclusively as an underground mine. In order to stabilize the abandoned surface main pit, its bottom was covered by a rubble layer 45 m (148 ft) thick.[1] After underground operations began, the project had a mine life estimate of 27 years, based on a drilling exploration program to a depth of 1,220 m (4,000 ft). Production ceased in 2001,[11] and the Mir mine closed in 2004.[12][13]

The mine was recommissioned in 2009, and is expected to remain operational for 50 more years

3

Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Arthur Travers Harris, 1st Baronet GCB OBE AFC (13 April 1892 – 5 April 1984), commonly known as "Bomber" Harris by the press and often within the RAF as "Butcher" Harris,[a] was Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief (AOC-in-C) RAF Bomber Command during the height of the Anglo-American strategic bombing campaign against Nazi Germany in the Second World War.

Born in Gloucestershire, Harris emigrated to Rhodesia in 1910, aged 17. He joined the 1st Rhodesia Regiment at the outbreak of the First World War and saw action in South Africa and South West Africa. In 1915, Harris returned to England to fight in the European theatre of the war. He joined the Royal Flying Corps, with which he remained until the formation of the Royal Air Force in 1918. Harris remained in the Air Force through the 1920s and 1930s, serving in India, Mesopotamia, Persia, Egypt, Palestine, and elsewhere.

At the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, Harris took command of No. 5 Group RAF in England, and in February 1942 was appointed head of Bomber Command. He retained that position for the rest of the war. In the same year, the British Cabinet agreed to the "area bombing" of German cities. Harris was given the task of implementing Churchill's policy and supported the development of tactics and technology to perform the task more effectively. Harris assisted British Chief of the Air Staff Marshal of the Royal Air Force Charles Portal in carrying out the United Kingdom's most devastating attacks against the German infrastructure and population, including the Bombing of Dresden. After the war Harris moved to South Africa, where he managed the South African Marine Corporation. He was created a baronet in 1953.

Harris's continued preference for area bombing over precision targeting remains controversial, partly because many senior Allied air commanders thought it less effective and partly for the large number of civilian casualties and destruction the strategy caused in Continental Europe.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 20, 2021, 12:04 am

1

Kharcho, also spelled as Harcho (Georgian: ხარჩო), is a traditional Georgian soup containing beef, rice, cherry plum purée and chopped walnuts (Juglans regia). The soup is usually served with finely chopped fresh coriander. The characteristic ingredients of the soup are meat, cherry plum purée made from tklapi or tkemali, rice, chopped walnuts and a spice mix which varies between different regions of Georgia.

An example of a Georgian recipe for Kharcho is made using beef, lamb, pork, chicken or goose.[1][2] Cut a cleaned, thoroughly washed piece of beef brisket into pieces, put it in 2 quarts of water, bring to the boil and simmer for 2–2.5 hours, skimming the foam. When the meat is soft add the rice; after 10 minutes add the chopped walnuts, allspice, bay leaf and peppercorns. When it is almost ready add the cherry plum paste, the spices (cerulea, coriander seed, paprika, Turkish smoked red pepper) and then simmer for 5 minutes more. Adjust salt, add the fresh coriander, let it cool, and serve.

2

Why were the allies ‘scared’ of invading Japan if the Japanese military was effectively non existent by then?
Because the Japanese were fighting to the death.

Consider Iwo Jima. The US attacked with 110,000 men and suffered 26,000 casualties with about 8,000 dead. Of the 20,000 or so Japanese defenders about 18,000 had died and only 216 had surrendered at the end of the battle.

Or consider Okinawa. The US suffered about 80,000 casualties with about 25,000 dead. The Japanese lost around 110,000 dead in the military along with anywhere from 40-150,00 civilian dead.

The Japanese on Okinawa were using Kamikaze attacks. This didn't just involve suicide aircraft bombs, but suicide bomb attacks on tanks and personnel. Some of these were carried out by schoolchildren who were forced to volunteer – about 2,000 children died on the battlefield.

3

When the American Revolution broke out in 1775, the colonists didn’t yet unite under a single flag. Instead, they fought mainly under unit or regimental flags, according to Marc Leepson, author of the book “Flag: An American Biography.” One flag of the time featured a picture of a coiled rattlesnake with the slogan “Don’t Tread on Me,” while another showed a pine tree with the words “An Appeal to Heaven.” “There really wasn’t anything that was stars and stripes, red, white and blue,” said Mike Buss, a flag expert with the American Legion veterans’ organization.
In June 1775, the Second Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, created a united colonial fighting force known as the Continental Army. Some historians claim that George Washington, the army’s commander in chief, ordered that a flag called the Continental Colors be raised the following New Year’s Day during a siege of British-occupied Boston. But David Martucci, past president of the North American Vexillological Association, the world’s largest group dedicated to the study of flags, believes Washington likely raised a British Union Jack instead. The Continental Colors, which contained 13 alternating red and white stripes with a Union Jack in the upper left-hand corner, was only used by the navy and perhaps at forts, according to Martucci. “It was sort of a compromise between the radicals who wanted to see a separate nation and the people who were more conciliatory and wanted to see some accommodation with the crown,” he said.
Either way, Washington realized soon after that it probably wasn’t a good idea to fly a flag resembling that of the enemy, Leepson said. The Second Continental Congress was busy drafting a constitution known as the Articles of Confederation, seeking an alliance with France and supplying the war effort. But on June 14, 1777, it took time from its schedule to pass a resolution stating that “the flag of the United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white” and that “the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.” To this day, no one knows who designed the flag or why that particular color combination and pattern were chosen. Although legend holds that Betsy Ross made the first American flag in 1776 after being asked to do so by Washington, primary sources backing up that assertion are scarce.
It was almost unheard of for individuals to fly the U.S. flag until the Civil War broke out in 1861, at which time the Stars and Stripes suddenly became a popular symbol in the North, according to Leepson. “This is the beginning of what some people call the cult of the flag, the almost religious feeling that many Americans have for the red, white and blue,” he said. In 1870 the Betsy Ross legend took off when her grandson held a press conference touting her possible role in sewing the first flag, and the earliest flag protection laws appeared not long after. Meanwhile, in 1885, Wisconsin teacher Bernard Cigrand originated the idea for a national flag day.
In 1912, President William Howard Taft signed an executive order that, for the first time, clarified what the flag should look like. Up until then, some flags were oddly proportioned, Leepson explained, or even had six- or eight-pointed stars. Four years later, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation officially establishing a nationwide observance of Flag Day on June 14, the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777. And in 1949, President Harry Truman signed legislation designating June 14 of each year as National Flag Day. Though Flag Day is not a federal holiday, the U.S. government encourages its citizens to display Old Glory outside of their homes and businesses. The tradition is not widely observed, however. “To most folks, unfortunately, Flag Day is not on their radar screen,” Buss said.
It was almost unheard of for individuals to fly the U.S. flag until the Civil War broke out in 1861, at which time the Stars and Stripes suddenly became a popular symbol in the North, according to Leepson. “This is the beginning of what some people call the cult of the flag, the almost religious feeling that many Americans have for the red, white and blue,” he said. In 1870 the Betsy Ross legend took off when her grandson held a press conference touting her possible role in sewing the first flag, and the earliest flag protection laws appeared not long after. Meanwhile, in 1885, Wisconsin teacher Bernard Cigrand originated the idea for a national flag day.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Shado » June 20, 2021, 11:11 am

Doodoo wrote:
June 20, 2021, 12:04 am
...The tradition is not widely observed, however. “To most folks, unfortunately, Flag Day is not on their radar screen,” Buss said.
That must be a regional sentiment. It's certainly is not the case where I'm from (the Midwest). I have a home in rural Missouri and it has a flag pole socket on the front porch. My neighbors display their flags on National Flag Day and many organizations have National Flag Day ceremonies with participants such as 4H groups, the American Legion, VFW chapters, Scouts, and other patriots.

I don't doubt there are parts of the USA that no longer commemorate the adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777 but there are quite a few areas that still do.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 20, 2021, 11:47 am

Thanks for the comments Great to get information to learn more

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 21, 2021, 12:49 am

1

Who was the first President to visit all 50 States

a) Nixon
b) Reagan
c) Clinton

2

Food that are not great you us

A)
Sausages
High in both fat and salt, sausages have never made it onto any diet list. But more recently, the risks associated with sausages are known to include cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The same goes for most industrially processed meats.

B)
Milk
Milk contains saturated fats that could increase the risk of heart disease or rheumatism. Consuming full-fat milk in small amounts won't hurt you (a splash in your coffee, with cereal), but the American Heart Association does recommend sticking to fat-free or low-fat dairy products. You can also alternate plant-based milks with dairy-based kinds for a healthier mix. Find out here which milk is right for you.


C)
Artificial Sweeteners
Artificial sweeteners have fewer calories than sugar, but that doesn't make them any healthier. They have an especially negative influence on your metabolism. Try natural sweeteners like Stevia, agave syrup or coconut flakes.

D)
Non-Organic Potatoes
You might think that washing and scrubbing your potatoes is sufficient for removing the herbicides, fungicides and pesticides that contaminate its soil during growth and treatment, but don't be so sure. All those chemicals get absorbed in the flesh, which means even if you tried to let it sprout on its own, it wouldn't (that's not natural).

E)
Fried foods
Those are two words that go against any healthy diet. Avoid fried foods for the calories but also for the risk of trans fats from the hydrogenated oils used in most fast food chains.

3

John F Kennedy was considered tobe the ____________ US President

a) Catholic
b) Harvard educated
c) Irish
d) Clean shaven





ANSWERS

1
A) Nixon

3
A) Catholic

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 22, 2021, 1:53 am

1

What is a Coin Collector called

a) Numismatis

b) Coleopterist

c) Tegestologist

2

First UK prime Minister that is Catholic

a) Boris Johnson

b) Boris Johnson

c) Boris Johnson


3
PLASTIC CONTAINERS AND MICROWAVES
YOU KNOW IT'S NOT A HEALTHY HABIT TO POP PLASTIC LEFTOVER CONTAINERS IN THERE, BUT YOU STILL DO. HERE'S WHY THAT'S BAD: MANY PLASTICS CONTAIN ESTROGEN-LIKE CHEMICALS (BPA IS A WELL-KNOWN ONE) THAT CAN LEACH INTO YOUR FOOD WHEN THE PLASTIC IS HEATED.

IN A STUDY PUBLISHED IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES, 95 PER CENT OF 450 PLASTIC PRODUCTS (SUCH AS BABY BOTTLES, ZIPPER-TOP BAGS AND CONTAINERS) TESTED RELEASED CHEMICALS THAT ACTED LIKE ESTROGEN AFTER THEY WERE MICROWAVED, WASHED IN A DISHWASHER, OR SOAKED IN WATER. EVEN PRODUCTS LABELED "BPA-FREE" RELEASED ESTROGEN-LIKE CHEMICALS. BETTER TO BE SAFE AND WARM UP YOUR DINNER DIRECTLY ON A PLATE.
4

IN THE LATER STAGES OF THE WAR IN EUROPE, ALLIED PARATROOPERS USED THESE SCOOTERS TO MAINTAIN CONTACT BETWEEN UNITS, INCREASE THEIR MOBILITY AND HAUL SMALL LOADS. THE CUSHMAN MOTOR WORKS DESIGNED THE MODEL 53 AIRBORNE SCOOTER TO BE AIRDROPPED BY PARACHUTE OR CARRIED BY GLIDER. SOME SCOOTERS, LIKE THIS ONE, HAD A HITCH TO PULL A MODEL M3A4 GENERAL-PURPOSE UTILITY CART. BY ADDING CERTAIN EQUIPMENT, THE CART COULD BE CONVERTED TO CARRY A .30-CAL. OR .50-CAL. MACHINE GUN OR EVEN A 81MM MORTAR. CUSHMAN MADE 4,734 AIRBORNE SCOOTERS FOR THE MILITARY BEGINNING IN 1944. THE RUGGED, SIMPLE MODEL 53 COULD TRAVEL THROUGH A FOOT OF WATER, CLIMB A 25 PERCENT GRADE, AND HAD A RANGE OF APPROXIMATELY 100 MILES. THE SCOOTER IS POWERED BY A CUSHMAN 1-CYLINDER 16M71 PRODUCING 4.6 HP. THE SCOOTER WEIGHS 255 LBS AND HAS A MAXIMUM SPEED OF 40 MPH.


ANSWERS
1
a) Numismatis Coin Collector

b) Coleopterist Beetle collector

c) Tegestologist Beer Coaster Collector

2

Well take a guess

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 23, 2021, 12:18 am

1

What personal experience did Steve McQueen bring to the Great Escape movie?

a) His military experience

b) His Father's firsthand accounts

c) His own time in Solitarie Confinement


2

Edward Vernon Rickenbacker (October 8, 1890 – July 23, 1973) was an American fighter ace in World War I and a Medal of Honor recipient. With 26 aerial victories, he was the United States' most successful fighter ace in the war and is considered to have received the most awards for valor by an American during the war.[1] He was also a race car driver and automotive designer, a government consultant in military matters and a pioneer in air transportation, particularly as the long-time head of Eastern Air Lines.

As commander of the 94th Aero Squadron[edit]
Rickenbacker went right to work turning his men "back into a team."[37] He gathered his pilots and exhorted them to stay focused on their mission: shooting down enemy planes. Reminding the mechanics that he was one of them, he stressed the crucial importance of their work. Above all, he let them know that he was a "gimper": "a bird who will stick by you through anything"[38] and "would never ask anybody to do anything that [he] would not do [him]self first or do at the same time."[39] To underscore his point, the next morning Rickenbacker took a solo patrol over the line and shot down two enemy planes. The victories in the air above Billy, France, later earned him the Medal of Honor, awarded by President Herbert Hoover in 1931.

Building on the leadership skills he had first developed with Maxwell in 1915–1916, Rickenbacker turned the 94th Squadron into a winning team. Rickenbacker was determined to "blind the eyes of the enemy"[40] by taking out his observation balloons. The giant gas bags appeared so temptingly easy to bring down but were in fact heavily guarded and extremely dangerous to attack. He led planning sessions for multi-squadron raids of as many as fourteen planes. One reporter likened him to a big time football coach, "boning up for the season ahead" with “conferences on methods, blackboard talks, and ideas for air battle tactics."[41] All the planning didn't guarantee success.

Rickenbacker himself was credited with bringing down five balloons, far fewer than the air service's most prolific balloon-buster, Frank Luke of the 27th Aero Squadron. In a two-week stretch, from September 12 to September 28, Luke sent 14 German observation balloons up in flames, among a total of 18 confirmed victories. It was the most remarkable performance of an American pursuit pilot in the entire war. (At the time, Rickenbacker had required four months of flying, not including his forced confinement in hospital, to amass 11 victories.) Luke's productivity came at the price of extreme recklessness. One airman in Rickenbacker's squadron wrote, "As the doctor's say to the press, he is not expected to live."[42] Rickenbacker was hoping to get him transferred to the 94th and tame his impetuosity.[43] He never got the chance. Luke was killed five days after Rickenbacker took command of the squadron.

Rickenbacker inculcated the squadron with his new principles of engagement, first germinated while confined in a Parisian hospital. Never attack unless there is at least 50–50 chance of success; always break off an engagement that seems hopeless; know the difference between cowardice and common sense.[44] He continued to fly aggressively, but with a calculated caution. What the sportswriter had written about Rickenbacker the race car driver still applied: "the most daring and withal the most cautious"[45] fighter pilot in the 1st Pursuit Group. He also flew more patrols, more hours in the air, than any other pilot in the service, a total of 300 combat hours. He brought down 15 aircraft in the final six weeks of the war, bringing his total victories to 26 and making him The United States's ace of aces for the war.

The military determined ace status by verifying combat claims by a pilot, but confirmation, too, was needed from ground witnesses, affirmations of other pilots, or observation of the wreckage of the opposing enemy aircraft. If no witnesses could be found, a reported kill was not counted. It was an imperfect system, dependent on the frailties of human observation, as well as vagaries of weather and terrain. Most aces' records are thus 'best estimates', not 'exact counts'. Nevertheless, Rickenbacker's 26 victories remained the American record until Richard Bong's 40 kills in World War II.

When Rickenbacker learned of the Armistice, he flew an airplane above the No Man's Land to observe the ceasefire as it occurred at 11:00 am on November 11. He later wrote, "I was the only audience for the greatest show ever presented. On both sides of no man's land, the trenches erupted. Brown-uniformed men poured out of the American trenches, gray-green uniforms out of the German. From my observer's seat overhead, I watched them throw their helmets in the air, discard their guns, wave their hands.

3
What are graciles
a) your shoulders
b) your eyes
c) your thighs







ANSWERS

1c) His own time in Solitarie Confinement
He used his time spent in Solitarie during his time at Youth Centers

3c) your thighs

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