Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 20, 2020, 5:47 am

1

Vere Gordon Childe (14 April 1892 – 19 October 1957) was an Australian archaeologist who specialised in the study of European prehistory. He spent most of his life in the United Kingdom, working as an academic for the University of Edinburgh and then the Institute of Archaeology, London. He wrote twenty-six books during his career. Initially an early proponent of culture-historical archaeology, he later became the first exponent of Marxist archaeology in the Western world.

Born in Sydney to a middle-class English migrant family, Childe studied classics at the University of Sydney before moving to England to study classical archaeology at the University of Oxford. There, he embraced the socialist movement and campaigned against the First World War, viewing it as a conflict waged by competing imperialists to the detriment of Europe's working class. Returning to Australia in 1917, he was prevented from working in academia because of his socialist activism, instead working for the Labor Party as the private secretary of the politician John Storey. Growing critical of Labor, he wrote an analysis of their policies and joined the far-left Industrial Workers of the World. Emigrating to London in 1921, he became librarian of the Royal Anthropological Institute and journeyed across Europe to pursue his research into the continent's prehistory, publishing his findings in academic papers and books. In doing so he introduced the continental European concept of an archaeological culture—the idea that a recurring assemblage of artefacts demarcates a distinct cultural group—to the British archaeological community.

2

that the Inuit identity of sipiniq referred to individuals who were believed to have changed their physical sex at the moment of birth, but were socialized as members of their original gender

3

. that the Austrian entomologist Gustav Mayr named more than 500 new species of ant?



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 21, 2020, 5:49 am

1

The Blitz was a German bombing campaign against the United Kingdom in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War. The term was first used by the British press and is the German word for 'lightning'.

The Germans conducted mass air attacks against industrial targets, towns, and cities, beginning with raids on London towards the end of the Battle of Britain in 1940 (a battle for daylight air superiority between the Luftwaffe and the Royal Air Force over the United Kingdom). By September 1940, the Luftwaffe had lost the Battle of Britain and the German air fleets (Luftflotten) were ordered to attack London, to draw RAF Fighter Command into a battle of annihilation. Adolf Hitler and Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, commander-in-chief of the Luftwaffe, ordered the new policy on 6 September 1940. From 7 September 1940, London was systematically bombed by the Luftwaffe for 56 of the following 57 days and nights. Most notable was a large daylight attack against London on 15 September.


The Luftwaffe gradually decreased daylight operations in favour of night attacks to evade attack by the RAF, and the Blitz became a night bombing campaign after October 1940. The Luftwaffe attacked the main Atlantic sea port of Liverpool in the Liverpool Blitz. The North Sea port of Hull, a convenient and easily found target or secondary target for bombers unable to locate their primary targets, suffered the Hull Blitz. The port cities of Bristol, Cardiff, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Southampton, Swansea, Belfast, and Glasgow were also bombed, as were the industrial centres of Birmingham, Coventry, Manchester and Sheffield. More than 40,000 civilians were killed by Luftwaffe bombing during the war, almost half of them in the capital, where more than a million houses were destroyed or damaged.


In early July 1940, the German High Command began planning Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union. Bombing failed to demoralise the British into surrender or do much damage to the war economy; eight months of bombing never seriously hampered British war production, which continued to increase.] The greatest effect was to force the British to disperse the production of aircraft and spare parts. British wartime studies concluded that cities generally took 10 to 15 days to recover when hit severely, but exceptions like Birmingham took three months.


The German air offensive failed because the Luftwaffe High Command (Oberkommando der Luftwaffe, OKL) did not develop a methodical strategy for destroying British war industry. Poor intelligence about British industry and economic efficiency led to OKL concentrating on tactics rather than strategy. The bombing effort was diluted by attacks against several sets of industries instead of constant pressure on the most vital.

2

Hideki Matsui (松井 秀喜, Matsui Hideki, born June 12, 1974), nicknamed "Godzilla"[1], is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder and designated hitter who played baseball in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) and Major League Baseball (MLB).[2] He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Matsui played the first ten seasons of his career in Japan for NPB's Yomiuri Giants. During that span, he was a nine-time All-Star, three-time Japan Series champion, and three-time Central League Most Valuable Player (MVP). In 2003, Matsui transitioned to playing in MLB in North America, and spent his first seven seasons there with the New York Yankees. As a Yankee, he was a two-time All-Star and 2009 World Series champion, for which he was named the World Series MVP. After becoming a free agent, Matsui had one-year stints with three other MLB teams: the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Oakland Athletics, and Tampa Bay Rays. On July 28, 2013, Matsui signed a one-day minor league contract with the Yankees in order to officially retire with the team.

During his 20-year playing career, Matsui hit 507 home runs – 332 in NPB and 175 in MLB. In 2018, Matsui was inducted into the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 22, 2020, 5:47 am

1

On October 20, 2011, Muammar al-Qaddafi, the longest-serving leader in Africa and the Arab world, is captured and killed by rebel forces near his hometown of Sirte. The eccentric 69-year-old dictator, who came to power in a 1969 coup, headed a government that was accused of numerous human rights violations against its own people and was linked to terrorist attacks, including the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland.

After more than 40 years in power, Qaddafi saw his regime begin to unravel in February 2011, when anti-government protests broke out in Libya following the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia earlier that year. Qaddafi vowed to crush the revolt and ordered a violent crackdown against the demonstrators. However, by August, rebel forces, with assistance from NATO, had gained control of Tripoli and established a transitional government. Qaddafi went into hiding, but on October 20, 2011, he was captured and shot by rebel forces.

2

REO Speedwagon (originally stylized as R.E.O. Speedwagon) is an American rock band from Champaign, Illinois. Formed in 1967, the band cultivated a following during the 1970s and achieved significant commercial success throughout the 1980s. The group's best-selling album, Hi Infidelity (1980), contained four US Top 40 hits and sold more than 10 million copies.

Over the course of its career, the band has sold more than 40 million records and has charted 13 Top 40 hits, including the number ones "Keep On Loving You" and "Can't Fight This Feeling". REO Speedwagon's mainstream popularity waned in the late 1980s, but the band remains a popular live act.

OR

The REO Speed Wagon (alternatively Reo Speedwagon) was a light motor truck manufactured by REO Motor Car Company. It is an ancestor of the pickup truck.

First introduced in 1915, production continued through at least 1953, and made REO (the initials of its founder, Ransom Eli Olds) one of the better-known manufacturers of commercial vehicles in America prior to World War II.[1] Although the basic design and styling of the chassis remained consistent, the Speed Wagon was manufactured in a variety of configurations (pickup and panel truck, passenger bus) to serve as delivery, tow, dump, and fire trucks, as well as hearses and ambulances. Other manufacturers[2] provided refits for adapting the Speed Wagon for specialized purposes.[3][4] The Speed Wagon used REO's "Gold Crown" series of engines, and was well regarded for power, durability, and quality.[5]

While REO produced some wagons based on its automobile chassis (the Model H) starting in 1908 and had organized a division to produce trucks in 1910 with success, the Speed Wagon's introduction in 1915 was a significant step and a sales success. The company was soon offering a variety of Speed Wagon models with many options, and by 1925 had produced 125,000.[6]

After years of roughly equal car and truck emphasis, REO shifted its focus completely to trucks, ending automobile production in 1936. Production for the civilian market was suspended during World War II, resuming in 1946.[citation needed]

The rock and roll quintet REO Speedwagon took its name from this vehicle, which in turn, later adapted into a main character in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 23, 2020, 8:22 am

1

Edward Donald Slovik (February 18, 1920 – January 31, 1945) was a United States Army soldier during World War II and the only American soldier to be court-martialled and executed for desertion since the American Civil War.[1][2] Although over 21,000 American soldiers were given varying sentences for desertion during World War II, including 49 death sentences, Slovik's death sentence was the only one that was carried out.


During World War II, 1.7 million courts-martial were held, representing one third of all criminal cases tried in the United States during the same period. Most of the cases were minor, as were the sentences.[2] Nevertheless, a clemency board, appointed by the Secretary of War in the summer of 1945, reviewed all general courts-martial where the accused was still in confinement,[2][5] and remitted or reduced the sentence in 85 percent of the 27,000 serious cases reviewed.[2] The death penalty was rarely imposed, and usually only for cases involving rape or murder. Slovik was the only soldier executed who had been convicted of a "purely military" offense.



2

On October 21, 1959, on New York City’s Fifth Avenue, thousands of people line up outside a bizarrely shaped white concrete building that resembled a giant upside-down cupcake. It was opening day at the new Guggenheim Museum, home to one of the world’s top collections of contemporary art.

Mining tycoon Solomon R. Guggenheim began collecting art seriously when he retired in the 1930s. With the help of Hilla Rebay, a German baroness and artist, Guggenheim displayed his purchases for the first time in 1939 in a former car showroom in New York. Within a few years, the collection—including works by Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and Marc Chagall—had outgrown the small space. In 1943, Rebay contacted architect Frank Lloyd Wright and asked him to take on the work of designing not just a museum, but a “temple of spirit,” where people would learn to see art in a new way.

Over the next 16 years, until his death six months before the museum opened, Wright worked to bring his unique vision to life. To Wright’s fans, the museum that opened on October 21, 1959, was a work of art in itself. Inside, a long ramp spiraled upwards for a total of a quarter-mile around a large central rotunda, topped by a domed glass ceiling. Reflecting Wright’s love of nature, the 50,000-meter space resembled a giant seashell, with each room opening fluidly into the next.

Wright’s groundbreaking design drew criticism as well as admiration. Some felt the oddly-shaped building didn’t complement the artwork. They complained the museum was less about art and more about Frank Lloyd Wright. On the flip side, many others thought the architect had achieved his goal: a museum where building and art work together to create “an uninterrupted, beautiful symphony.”

Located on New York’s impressive Museum Mile, at the edge of Central Park, the Guggenheim has become one of the city’s most popular attractions. In 1993, the original building was renovated and expanded to create even more exhibition space. Today, Wright’s creation continues to inspire awe, as well as odd comparisons—a Jello mold! a washing machine! a pile of twisted ribbon!—for many of the 900,000-plus visitors who visit the Guggenheim each year.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 24, 2020, 7:58 am

1

Martin James Monti (October 24, 1921 – September 11, 2000) was a United States Army Air Forces pilot who defected to the Axis powers in October 1944 and worked as a propaganda broadcaster and writer. After the end of World War II, he was tried and sentenced for desertion; he was then pardoned but subsequently tried for treason and sentenced to 25 years.
Monti claimed that he stole the plane to fight the Germans, and that he was shot down, and that he had been working with partisans, who gave him the SS uniform. His claims were believed, so in 1946, he was court-martialed for stealing the plane and for desertion. He was sentenced to 15 years in prison which was quickly suspended and he was allowed to reenlist in the Army Air Forces as a Private on February 11, 1947. He was a Sergeant when he was honorably discharged on January 26, 1948. Only minutes later, the FBI arrested him at Mitchel Field, New York, and charged him with treason for the propaganda activities performed by "Martin Wiethaupt", whom the FBI had identified as Monti.[11] On October 14, a federal grand jury in Brooklyn indicted him for 21 acts of treason committed between October 13, 1944, and May 8, 1945, the day hostilities in Europe ended.[6]

On January 17, 1949, he pleaded guilty, surprising the prosecutors and the court, which had prepared for a lengthy trial. Because of the seriousness of the charges, the court required testimony despite his guilty plea, and, according to The New York Times, "Without hesitation, Monti took the witness chair" where he admitted all the charges. Asked by the judge if he had acted "voluntarily", he answered "Yes". His attorney then asked for leniency, citing his upbringing in an extremist and isolationist environment that "fanatically imbued" him to identify Soviet Russia as the nation's principal enemy. Nevertheless, he was sentenced to 25 years in prison and ordered to pay a fine of $10,000.[12]

Monti served his sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary, Kansas. In 1951, he tried without success to withdraw his guilty plea, insisting he had "no treasonable intent" when he flew into enemy territory and claiming that he had been pressured by his attorneys into pleading guilty.[13] He was paroled in 1960[citation needed] and lived in Fort Lauderdale, Florida under relative obscurity until the time of his death in 2000.[14] He was buried at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Florissant, Missouri.

2

Lydia Vladimirovna Litvyak (Russian: Лидия Владимировна Литвяк; 18 August 1921, in Moscow – 1 August 1943, in Krasnyi Luch), also known as Lilya, was a fighter pilot in the Soviet Air Force during World War II.[1] Historians' estimates for her total victories range from five to twelve solo victories and two to four shared kills in her 66 combat sorties.[2][3][4][5][6] In about two years of operations, she was the first female fighter pilot to shoot down an enemy aircraft, the first of two female fighter pilots who have earned the title of fighter ace and the holder of the record for the greatest number of kills by a female fighter pilot. She was shot down near Orel during the Battle of Kursk as she attacked a formation of German aircraft.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Drunk Monkey » October 24, 2020, 8:02 am

Great over brekkie read doodoo .. thanks
Claret n Blue all way thru .. Up the Iron
L2 Season 19/20 Codheads 0 Scunny 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2qrsItFUug
8 minutes is the point of lift off !!!!!!!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 24, 2020, 9:05 am

Thank you DM

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 25, 2020, 3:07 am

1

On October 23, 2002, about 50 Chechen rebels storm a Moscow theater, taking up to 700 people hostage during a sold-out performance of a popular musical.

The second act of the musical “Nord Ost” was just beginning at the Moscow Ball-Bearing Plant’s Palace of Culture when an armed man walked onstage and fired a machine gun into the air. The terrorists—including a number of women with explosives strapped to their bodies—identified themselves as members of the Chechen Army. They had one demand: that Russian military forces begin an immediate and complete withdrawal from Chechnya, the war-torn region located north of the Caucasus Mountains.

Chechnya, with its predominately Muslim population, had long struggled to assert its independence. A disastrous two-year war ended in 1996, but Russian forces returned to the region just three years later after Russian authorities blamed Chechens for a series of bombings in Russia. In 2000, President Vladimir Putin was elected partly because of his hard-line position towards Chechnya and his public vow not to negotiate with terrorists.

After a 57-hour-standoff at the Palace of Culture, during which two hostages were killed, Russian special forces surrounded and raided the theater on the morning of October 26. Later it was revealed that they had pumped a powerful narcotic gas into the building, knocking nearly all of the terrorists and hostages unconscious before breaking into the walls and roof and entering through underground sewage tunnels. Most of the guerrillas and 120 hostages were killed during the raid. Security forces were later forced to defend the decision to use the dangerous gas, saying that only a complete surprise attack could have disarmed the terrorists before they had time to detonate their explosives.
After the theater crisis, Putin’s government clamped down even harder on Chechnya, drawing accusations of kidnapping, torture and other atrocities. In response, Chechen rebels continued their terrorist attacks on Russian soil, including an alleged suicide bombing in a Moscow subway in February 2004 and another major hostage crisis at a Beslan school that September.
2
Doctor Barnett Slepian is shot to death inside his home in Amherst, New York by an anti-abortion radical. His killing marks the fifth straight year that an abortion-providing doctor in upstate New York and Canada became the victim of a sniper attack.

Slepian and his family had just returned from religious services at their synagogue when a bullet shattered the kitchen window and struck him in the back. Each of the five attacks, the first four of which did not result in fatal wounds, occurred in late October or early November.

Investigators in both Canada and the United States believed that James Charles Kopp, known among abortion opponents as “Atomic Dog,” was responsible for Slepian’s murder. Although he had been seen in the vicinity of Slepian’s home in the weeks before the killing, Kopp, a member of the terrorist group Army of God, was nowhere to be found after the incident.

In the aftermath of Slepian’s murder, at least four doctors in upstate New York quit practicing, and countless other clinic staff members left their jobs. Following Slepian’s murder, a serious crackdown on anti-abortion terror cut down the number of violent incidents.

In 1999, for the first time in six years, there were no sniper attacks against any doctors during the course of the year. As the 20th century came to an end, Kopp remained at large, despite a $500,000 reward for information leading to his capture from the Justice Department and his place on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List.

In March 2001, the authorities caught up with Kopp in Europe, and he was extradited from France on the condition he would not receive the death penalty. Kopp, whose defense argued he only intended to wound Slepian, was convicted of second-degree murder. On May 9, 2003, Kopp was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 27, 2020, 5:41 am

1

The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam)[3] is a disused dam in northern Italy. It is one of the tallest dams in the world, with a height of 262 metres (860 feet).[4] It is situated in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto e Casso, 100 kilometres (62 miles) north of Venice.

The dam was conceived in the 1920s and eventually built between 1957 and 1960 by Società Adriatica di Elettricità (SADE), at the time the electricity supply and distribution monopoly in northeastern Italy. In 1962 the dam was nationalized and came under the control of ENEL as part of the Italian Ministry for Public Works.

On 9 October 1963, during initial filling, a landslide caused a megatsunami in the lake in which 50 million cubic metres of water overtopped the dam in a wave of 250 metres (820 ft),[1] leading to the complete destruction of several villages and towns, and 1,917 deaths. Although the dam itself remained almost intact and two thirds of the water was retained behind it, the landslide was much larger than expected and the impact brought massive flooding and destruction to the Piave Valley below.

This event occurred after the company and the Italian government concealed reports and dismissed evidence that Monte Toc, on the southern side of the basin, was geologically unstable. They had disregarded numerous warnings, signs of danger, and negative appraisals, and the eventual attempts to safely control the landslide by lowering the lake's level came when the landslide was almost imminent.



2

Countires that has disappeared
Kingdom of Dahomey (c.1600–1894)
Located in modern-day Benin, the Kingdom of Dahomey was established around 1600 by the Fon people and grew to become a major regional power. Its economy was built on slavery and trade, and the country boomed as an independent state for several centuries.
The kingdom was famous for its female Amazon warriors and cultivated a fearsome reputation, holding annual ritual celebrations that involved mass human sacrifice. Still, Dahomey succumbed to the European Scramble for Africa, falling in 1893 after individual Béhanzin's troops were defeated by French forces at the Battle of Cana.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 28, 2020, 2:29 am

1

The lyre is a string instrument known for its use in Greek classical antiquity and later periods. The lyre is similar in appearance to a small harp but with distinct differences.

In organology, lyre is defined as a "yoke lute", being a lute in which the strings are attached to a yoke that lies in the same plane as the sound-table and consists of two arms and a cross-bar.

In Ancient Greece, recitations of lyric poetry were accompanied by lyre playing. The earliest picture of a lyre with seven strings appears in the famous sarcophagus of Hagia Triada (a Minoan settlement in Crete). The sarcophagus was used during the Mycenaean occupation of Crete (c. 1400 BC).

The lyre of classical antiquity was ordinarily played by being strummed with a plectrum (pick), like a guitar or a zither, rather than being plucked with the fingers as with a harp. The fingers of the free hand silenced the unwanted strings in the chord. Other instruments, also called "lyres", were played with a bow in Europe and parts of the Middle East, namely the Arabic rebab and its descendants,[3] including the Byzantine lyra.


2

World Submarine Rankings: Weapons Load

The more torpedoes and missiles a submarine carries, the more targets it can attack. There are many other variables at play (context is everything), but the maximum weapons load of a submarine is a real consideration. This ranking is compiled from my submarine database (see the Covert Shores recognition book HERE). I have calculated it based on total number of torpedo tubes (assuming that they can be used to carry a torpedo), plus the maximum number of torpedo ravks in the torpedo room, plus any VLS or slanted lanch tubes.

The history and evolution of the torpedo room is really interesting. And generally not well understood by the general public. So it is worth a whole article in its own right,...

The ranking assumes that every possible 'slot' is occupied. This is unrealistic in many cases but is the fairest way to compare them. I have assumed full-sized weapons, except in submarines specifically designed to carry a smaller weapon as part of their main arsenal (e.g. Swedish submarines using 400mm weapons). I have excluded mines carried externally.

Finally, ballistic missile submarines (SSBN / SSB / SSBA) are excluded, as are a handful of special mission submarines (mostly unarmed anyway) and dedicated test submarines.

RANKINGs
Rank, Class, Country of Design, Torpedo Tubes, Torpedo Room, VLS, Total (notes)

1. Ohio (SSGN), United States. 4 + 16 + 154 = 174
2. SEVERODVINSK-II, Russia. 10 + 30 + 32 = 72
3. OSCAR-II, Russia. 6 + 22 + 24 = 52 (Will increase to 100 with 'AM' modernization)
4. Seawolf Class, United States. 8 + 42 + 0 = 50
5. AKULA Class, Russia. 8 + 32 + 0 = 40 (Baseline. Excludes decoy tubes.)
5. SIERRA Class, Russia. 8 + 32 + 0 = 40 (SIERRA-I / II)
7. Astute Class, United Kingdom. 6 + 32 + 0 = 38
7. Virginia Class (Block IV), United States. 4 + 22 + 12 = 38
9. Improved Los-Angeles Class, United States. 4 + 21 + 12 = 37
10. Trafalgar Class, United Kingdom. 5 + 25 + 0 = 30
---------------

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 29, 2020, 3:25 am

1

President Taft was the first President to own and electric car
William Taft (president from 1909-1913): Baker Electric — Taft was the first president to own and drive cars during his presidency. One of the most interesting cars he owned was, ironically enough, “green” — a Baker Electric. This electric vehicle was especially popular with women in the era, as it did not require any cranking and was virtually maintenance-free.


2
WD 40
Clean Drip Pans With Ease
If you love to cook then you know how much cooking can take a toll on your stovetop — particularly the drip pans. The drip pans work to catch all of the food that drips below the top of the stove, so naturally, they accumulate grease and other debris.
Thanks to layers of build-up, cleaning drip pans is challenging. But you can use WD-40 to easily remove grease and grime. All you have to do is remove the burners from your stovetop so you can access the drip pans. Clean up loose debris and then spray a coat of WD-40 on the drip pans. Let sit for a few minutes and then wipe away with a warm washcloth.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 30, 2020, 5:49 am

ANSWERS BELOW


1
Mystery object riddle
The person who built it sold it. The person who bought it never used it. The person who used it never saw it. What is it?



2
Feet, eyes, and life
I have no feet to dance, I have no eyes to see, I have no life to live or die but yet I do all three. What am I?

3
Strange noises
This place has hardly any lights, but a lot of creaking floors. There are all kinds of strange noises and some random slamming doors. What is it?











ANSWERS

1) A coffin.

2) Fire.

3) A haunted house.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 31, 2020, 6:18 am

1

The Battle of Ramree Island (also Operation Matador) was fought in January and February 1945, during the Second World War, as part of the XV Indian Corps offensive on the Southern Front in the Burma Campaign. Ramree Island (Yangbye Kywan) lies off the Burma coast, 110 km (70 mi) south of Akyab (now Sittwe). The island had been captured by the Imperial Japanese Army in early 1942, along with the rest of Southern Burma. In January 1945, the Allies launched an attack to retake Ramree and its neighbour Cheduba Island, to establish airbases on the islands for the supply of the mainland campaign. There have been reports of Japanese soldiers being eaten by saltwater crocodiles living in the inland mangrove swamps; the Guinness Book of World Records has listed it as "worst crocodile disaster in the world" and "most number of fatalities in a crocodile attack" approximately 500 lives were lost



2

Hallowen has its roots in the ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of Samhain, which was celebrated on the night of October 31. The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, believed that the dead returned to earth on Samhain. On the sacred night, people gathered to light bonfires, offer sacrifices and pay homage to the dead.




3

Did you know? Although it is unknown precisely where and when the phrase “trick or treat” was coined, the custom had been firmly established in American popular culture by 1951, when trick-or-treating was depicted in the Peanuts comic strip. In 1952, Disney produced a cartoon called “Trick or Treat” featuring Donald Duck and his nephews Huey, Dewey and Louie.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 5, 2020, 5:55 am

1

European Union goes into effect
The Maastricht Treaty comes into effect, formally establishing the European Union (EU). The treaty was drafted in 1991 by delegates from the European Community meeting at Maastricht in the Netherlands and signed in 1992. The agreement called for a strengthened European parliament, the creation of a central European bank, and common foreign and security policies. The treaty also laid the groundwork for the establishment of a single European currency, to be known as the “euro.”
By 1993, 12 nations had ratified the Maastricht Treaty on European Union: Great Britain, France, Germany, the Irish Republic, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece, Denmark, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Austria, Finland, and Sweden became members of the EU in 1995. After suffering through centuries of bloody conflict, the nations of Western Europe were finally united in the spirit of economic cooperation.
In 2016, in what became known as "Brexit," the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union.

2
British archaeologist Howard Carter and his workmen discover a step leading to the tomb of individual Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt.
When Carter first arrived in Egypt in 1891, most of the ancient Egyptian tombs had been discovered, though the little-known individual Tutankhamen, who had died when he was 18, was still unaccounted for. After World War I, Carter began an intensive search for “individual Tut’s Tomb,” finally finding steps to the burial room hidden in the debris near the entrance of the nearby tomb of individual Ramses VI in the Valley of the Kings. On November 26, 1922, Carter and fellow archaeologist Lord Carnarvon entered the interior chambers of the tomb, finding them miraculously intact.
Thus began a monumental excavation process in which Carter carefully explored the four-room tomb over several years, uncovering an incredible collection of several thousand objects. The most splendid architectural find was a stone sarcophagus containing three coffins nested within each other. Inside the final coffin, which was made out of solid gold, was the mummy of the boy-individual Tutankhamen, preserved for more than 3,000 years. Most of these treasures are now housed in the Cairo Museum.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 6, 2020, 5:40 am

1

Why can't helicopters go on Everest?

It has been done, in fact a helicopter has landed on the summit.

However, that was a Squirrel, possibly the world’s most overpowered helicopter, and definitely the one with the best high-altitude performance… and it was specifically lightened for the attempt.

So… possible, but you almost have to build a special helicopter for the job. Most helicopters cannot even get close.

2

Why did German Admiral Karl Doenitz only receive a ten year prison sentence at the Nuremberg trials while his military co-defendants Generals Alfred Jodl and Wilhelm Keitel were both executed?
Because Admiral Doenitz might have fought a hard War but he did it cleanly. Although he was guilty for unrestricted submarine Warfare, the Americans were guilty of the same thing so they thought it was fair to not really sentence him for that.. Also the Admiral had a very good legal team which probably helped save his life.

Dönitz was sentenced to 10 years in prison – solely for his conviction related to waging a war of aggression. Once again, Dönitz's order to conduct unrestricted submarine warfare was not officially included in his sentence; however this was still the main reason why most judges wanted him convicted.”
At the Nuremberg trials, Donitz was charged with crimes against persons and property on the high seas and of participating in a conspiracy to wage aggressive war. He was found guilty of some charges and sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment. Except for three acquittals, it was the lightest sentence handed out. Years later Francis Biddle, one of the U.S. judges, said he thought Donitz should have been acquitted.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by AlexO » November 6, 2020, 7:30 am

The time and effort you put in is greatly appreciated. Certainly expanded my General Knowledge.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 6, 2020, 1:00 pm

and mine also
Thanks
It all uselss info I should have learnt some 50 years ago But being retired now it keeps me busy

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 7, 2020, 7:26 am

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Why didn't Japan retaliate after Hiroshima?


Clausewitz described the ultimate goal of battle as to deprive the enemy of the ability to make war.
By August 6, 1945:

The vast majority of IJN was already at the bottom of the sea.

They didn’t have fuel to send ships to sea.

The fuel situation was so tight that the IJN sent the pride of the fleet on a one way mission to Okinawa because they couldn’t scrounge up enough fuel for battle maneuver or a return trip - 400 miles.

Most of their cities were largely ashes, they didn’t have pilots with the skills for landing so they were wasting young men on Kamikaze missions.

They were planning to equip Japanese civilians with sharpened stakes to resist the expected Allied invasion.

The food situation was critical.

Japan was finished — the only question was how many more Japanese were going to die for Bushido. The short answer is that the Japanese did not have the ability to retaliate. Japan no longer had the ability to wage war. They only had the ability to order more futile deaths of their own populace.

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Are the Queen's Guards' guns loaded?

Do you see the funny thing all of the Guards are holding in their right hands? Those are SA80A2 assault rifles, each has a 30 round magazine of rounds fitted and a very sharp bayonet.
This Horse Guard has a cavalry sabre in his right hand , which will cut a man in half. They also carry automatic pistols and are very good shots.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 8, 2020, 4:04 am

1

American politicins in jail


https://www.therichest.com/rich-list/10 ... sentences/


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As the first Black aviators to serve in the U.S. Army Air Corps, the Tuskegee Airmen broke through a massive segregation barrier in the American military. Their success and heroism during World War II, fighting Germans in the skies over Europe, shattered pervasive stereotypes that African Americans had neither the character nor the aptitude for combat. And their achievements laid crucial groundwork for civil rights progress in the decades to come.
In the summer of 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Civilian Pilot Training Program Act to train civilian aviators at colleges and vocational schools in preparation for a national emergency. The law contained a provision that “none of the benefits of training or programs shall be denied on account of race, creed, or color.” At the time, there were only 124 licensed Black pilots in the United States—and none in the Army Air Corps. six historically black colleges and universities included in the program, the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama became the most renowned. In January 1941, the War Department, under pressure from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to include black aviators, established at Tuskegee the nation’s first Black flying unit: the 99 th Pursuit Squadron, which was later renamed the 99th Fighter Squadron.
Between 1941 and 1945, nearly 1,000 pilots trained in the Tuskegee program; of those, 450 saw combat during World II in the 99th and 332nd Fighter groups. In aerial battles over North Africa and Europe, these pilots flew more than 1,500 missions, largely as escort planes for the bombers, but sometimes in direct combat. Of the extraordinary men who served as Tuskegee-trained pilots,
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. (1912-2002)
At a time when African Americans faced overwhelming racism and discrimination in the military, Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., son of the Army’s first Black general, built a historic career: One of a small handful of African Americans to be admitted to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point since Reconstruction—and the only one there during his own tenure—he went on to command the Tuskegee Airmen, serve in three wars and become a general himself.

After graduating from West Point in 1936, Davis, Jr. was denied access to the Army Air Corp on the basis of race, and initially served as an infantry officer. In 1941, when the War Department began training Black pilots at the Tuskegee Airfield, he became one of the first five pilots to receive his wings. During World War II, he served as commander of both Tuskegee units to see combat: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332nd Fighter Group. Under his leadership, they shot down 112 enemy planes, and destroyed or damaged 273 on the ground. His groups lost just 66 of their planes and only about 25 of the bombers under their escort. For leading both units in Europe, Davis earned several honors, including the Silver Star. President Harry Truman later asked him to help draft the military’s landmark desegregation plan.

When Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in 1954, he became the first African American general in the Air Force. In 2002, he was promoted to full general on the retired list in a White House ceremony with President Bill Clinton. In 2019, the U.S. Air Force Academy named its airfield after him.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 9, 2020, 5:38 am

1

Definition of fuffle
intransitive verb

Scottish : to become disheveled or mussed up
transitive verb

Scottish : DISARRAY, MUSS
And for those
MUSSED UP is
SYNONYMS FOR mussed up
dirty
disarranged
disheveled
disordered
ruffled
rumpled
tangled

2

A group of rabitts is a Colony living in a Warren

In the wild, a colony of rabbits live in an underground structure called a warren, where they’ll spend most of their life away from danger, particularly during the day.

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