A little ray of sunshine from Australia

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Laan Yaa Mo
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » October 29, 2020, 7:06 pm

pipoz4444 wrote:
October 28, 2020, 11:25 am
Laan Yaa Mo wrote:
October 27, 2020, 9:11 am
Scotsmen are really nice people, and keen builders of Empire.
I could name one that wasn't that nice, "Mel Gibson".

In his historical documentary on Scotland, he killed a lot of people :D :D :D

pipoz444
I thought Mel Gibson was born in the U.S.A., I did not know he was Scottish. Also, I did not realise that 'Braveheart' was a historical documentary, I thought it was a movie.


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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by tamada » October 29, 2020, 7:18 pm

psst... pipoz. You wanna borrow my "over your head" animated gif?

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by jackspratt » October 29, 2020, 7:25 pm

tamada wrote:
October 29, 2020, 7:18 pm
psst... pipoz. You wanna borrow my "over your head" animated gif?
You should probably hold onto it for the time being.

The inverted commas, plus the smileys, gives an easily understood perspective to pipo's post.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Whistler » October 29, 2020, 7:27 pm

pipoz4444 wrote:
October 29, 2020, 2:27 pm
noosard wrote:
October 29, 2020, 2:24 pm
vegemite.jpg

All of them good
Vegemite my favourite one
Have never tried Promite?

I think it is also to do with what you try or are fed, when you are a child. If you are conditioned to like some foods when you are young, then they seem to stay with you for life. :-k

pipoz4444
I am an example that bucks this view

My Glaswegian mother, sent me to school in La Perouse (Sydney) with a lunch wrapped in an old sandwich plastic leftover bag. It consisted of a white bread sandwich narrowingly avoiding bacterium, with one processed Kraft cheese slice (blue pack) and vegemite, plus one atrophied jam sandwich. Despite this luncheon nightmare, I love Vegemite.

Saved pennies purchased a pie with tomato sauce (one shilling and a half penny) from gastronomic and nutritional oblivion.

I am still making pipe bombs for Kraft employees.
lies are already halfway around the world before the truth has laced up its shoes

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » October 29, 2020, 7:59 pm

tamada wrote:
October 29, 2020, 7:18 pm
psst... pipoz. You wanna borrow my "over your head" animated gif?
Sorry no comprendo \:D/ "gif"

pipoz4444

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » October 29, 2020, 8:01 pm

jackspratt wrote:
October 29, 2020, 7:25 pm
tamada wrote:
October 29, 2020, 7:18 pm
psst... pipoz. You wanna borrow my "over your head" animated gif?
You should probably hold onto it for the time being.

The inverted commas, plus the smileys, gives an easily understood perspective to pipo's post.
Good pick up Jack, I will give you an A++ for that :lol: no sarcasm intended :wave:

pipoz4444

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by tamada » October 29, 2020, 9:34 pm

Point missed...

Never mind.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 30, 2020, 11:19 am

If you have never travelled through the so called outback Australia, this place is about as outback as you can get with a settlement.
Travelled extensively through the middle of Australia in a VW kombi camper van in the early 80’s. Not much black strip road them days. Lots of dirt and corrugations. Couldn’t stop a kombi with independent suspension all round.

“On this day, 30th October 1890, Oodnadatta, in far north South Australia, is surveyed and declared a township, ahead of becoming a significant railway terminus.

Oodnadatta is a tiny town in the remote region of far north South Australia. With a 2006 population of just 277, it lies approximately 1,011 km from Adelaide. Close to the edge of the Simpson Desert, its name is derived from the Arrernte word "utnadata", meaning "blossom of the mulga".

The first explorer to arrive in the region was John McDouall Stuart, who explored and mapped the area in 1859. The Overland Telegraph line followed in the wake of Stuart's exploration. Soon after, the railway line from Adelaide was also constructed, with its terminus at Warrina. Oodnadatta was surveyed on 30 October 1890, and on that day it was also declared a Government township. Less than three months later, the railway line was opened from Warrina to Oodnadatta, and Oodnadatta became the terminus of the Great Northern Railway, later The Ghan.

With the development of the railway, Oodnadatta became a busy town in South Australia's far north, being a government service centre and supply depot for the surrounding pastoral properties. A post office was established in 1891, and an Anglican Sunday School a year later. A General store and Butcher also followed, among other businesses. Until the railway was extended to Alice Springs in 1929, the town was largely supplied from Alice Springs by Afghan camel trains. Oodnadatta's importance continued through to World War II, when the Australian Defence Forces established facilities to service troop trains and fighter aircraft en route to Darwin.

In 1981, the railway line was moved to the west, and the town became a residential freehold town for indigenous Australians.”

Pictures of Oodnadatta, supplied by Leo Fogarty to South Australian History.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 31, 2020, 9:54 am

Lest We Forget.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Whistler » October 31, 2020, 1:40 pm

Lest we forget the horses as well. The Whaler (from NSW) were used in this battle and extensively throughout Asia in the 19th Century. My father was trainer for these horses for the Hussars (British Army) on the NW frontier in India in the 1920's and 1930's
lies are already halfway around the world before the truth has laced up its shoes

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » November 2, 2020, 6:29 am

On this day, 2nd November 1922, Qantas establishes its first regular passenger air service between Charleville and Cloncurry.

Qantas is Australia's national airline service and the name was formerly an acronym for "Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services". The inspiration for Qantas came when, in March 1919, the Australian Federal Government offered a £10,000 prize for the first Australians to fly from England to Australia within 30 days. The challenge was taken up by W Hudson Fysh and Paul McGinness, former Australian Flying Corps officers who had served at Gallipoli. The men were promised sponsorship for the race by wealthy grazier Sir Samuel McCaughey, but McCaughey died before funding could be delivered.

Undaunted, Fysh and McGinness undertook an assignment from the Defence Department to survey part of the route of the race, travelling almost 2200km from Longreach in northwestern Queensland to Katherine in the Northern Territory in a Model T Ford. The journey took 51 days and covered territory which no motor vehicle had negotiated before, and the difficulties highlighted the need for a regular aerial service to link remote settlements in the Australian outback.

Fysh and McGinness sought sponsorship once again, but this time for a regular air service, rather than a one-off race. Wealthy grazier Fergus McMaster, whom McGinness had once assisted in the remote outback when his car broke an axle, was happy to fund the venture. McMaster also garnered further investment from his own business acquaintances. Originally purchased under the name of The Western Queensland Auto Aero Service Limited, the air service became the Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services, or Qantas, in November 1920.

Based in Winton, western Queensland, the original Qantas fleet was made up of just two biplanes: an Avro 504K with a 100 horsepower water-cooled Sunbeam Dyak engine and a Royal Aircraft Factory BE2E with a 90 horsepower air-cooled engine. The men’s former flight sergeant Arthur Baird was signed on as aircraft mechanic. Initially, the service operated just for joyrides and demonstrations, until the first major air contract was landed in November 1922.

On 2 November 1922, Qantas commenced its first regular airmail and passenger service, between Cloncurry and Charleville. The first passenger was 84-year-old outback pioneer Alexander Kennedy, who flew on the Longreach-Winton-McKinlay-Cloncurry leg of the inaugural mail service from Charleville to Cloncurry.

Pictured: P. J. McGinnis and a passenger in front of the Avro 504, the first aircraft purchased by QANTAS Ltd.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » November 3, 2020, 7:51 am

The Blue Mountains west of Sydney are a great place to visit, it took some time to not only find a path over, many tried and failed, but to eventually build road access was an large engineering feat.

Quote :

On this day, 3rd November 1804, George Caley crosses the Hawkesbury River in his unsuccessful attempt to cross the Blue Mountains west of Sydney.

George Caley was born at Craven, Yorkshire, England on 10 June 1770, within a few days of James Cook’s observation of the transit of Venus in Tahiti. He undertook a mere four years of formal schooling before leaving to work in his father’s stables. However, his interest in farriery led him to study botany, and eventually to a position in the Kew Gardens. In 1798, renowned botanist Sir Joseph Banks appointed him to go to New South Wales as a collector; Caley duly arrived in Sydney in April 1800.

In New South Wales, Caley undertook extensive studies of the native flora and fauna, and he was the first to study the eucalyptus species in detail. One of his first tasks was to try to procure a platypus, as a drawing sent back to England in 1797 was deemed a hoax. Whilst collecting specimens of various plants and animals for Sir Joseph Banks, he visited Western Port and Jervis Bay, the Hunter River, Norfolk Island and Van Diemen's Land. However, his real desire lay in crossing the Blue Mountains, a feat attempted unsuccessfully by numerous previous expeditions. He was motivated by ‘an enthusiastic pride of going farther than any person has yet been’. From Parramatta, he headed in a direct line for the range which Governor Phillip had named the Carmarthen Hills, specifically, the most obvious peak now known as Mount Banks. He took with him three strong men, believed to be convicts. On 3 November 1804, Caley crossed the Hawkesbury River and continued west on his mission.

Caley took a different approach from that of previous explorers who had tried to cross the Blue Mountains: he sought out the ridgetops, rather than travelling through the river valleys. However, like others before him, Caley was confounded by the unpredictability of the terrain, describing himself as ‘thunderstruck with the roughness of the country’. His naming of features such as Devil’s Wilderness, Dark Valley and Dismal Dingle reflected his frustration. The men reached Mount Banks on 14 November, where the precipitous cliffs of the upper Grose Valley prevented them from penetrating any further inland. He was forced to return to Sydney and later wrote to Banks ’the roughness of the country I found beyond description. I cannot give you a more expressive idea than travelling over the tops of houses in a town.’ He returned to Parramatta on 23 November, unsuccessful, but having reached a point further west than any previous expedition had done.

Pictured: A veiw [i.e. view] of the River Hawkesbury N.S. Wales, ca. 1810. Lewin, J. W. (John William), 1770-1819. Dixson Galleries, State Library of New South Wales

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » November 4, 2020, 9:24 am

On this day, 4th November 1930, Australia's greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, wins the Melbourne Cup.

Phar Lap, a giant chestnut thoroughbred gelding, standing 17.1 hands high, is regarded by many to be Australia's and New Zealand's greatest racehorse. A much loved Australian national icon, he was actually born and bred in Timaru, in the South Island of New Zealand, but never raced in New Zealand.

The name Phar Lap was derived from the shared Zhuang and Thai word for lightning. According to the Museum Victoria, medical student Aubrey Ping often visited the track in Randwick, talking with riders and trainers. He had learned some Zhuang from his father, who migrated to Australia from southern China. He reputedly suggested "Farlap" as the horse's name. Sydney trainer Harry Telford liked the name, but changed the F to a Ph to create a seven-letter word, and split it into two words, so as to replicate the dominant pattern set by Melbourne Cup winners.

Phar Lap dominated the racing scene in Australia during a long and distinguished career. In the four years of his racing career, he won 37 of 51 races he entered. During 1930 and 1931, he won 14 races in a row. On 4 November 1930, ridden by Jimmy Pike, Phar Lap won the Melbourne Cup. He started as the shortest-priced favourite in the history of the race at odds of 8–11, having finished third in 1929.

Phar Lap died in April 1932. A necropsy revealed that the horse's stomach and intestines were inflamed, and many believed he had been deliberately poisoned. A variety of theories have been propounded over the years. In 2006 Australian Synchrotron Research scientists said it was almost certain Phar Lap was poisoned with a large single dose of arsenic 35 hours before he died, supporting the belief that Phar Lap was killed on the orders of US gangsters, who feared the Melbourne-Cup-winning champion would inflict big losses on their illegal bookmakers.

Phar Lap's heart was a remarkable size, weighing 6.2 kg, compared with a normal horse's heart at 3.2 kg. Phar Lap's heart is now held at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. It is consistently the display visitors request most often to see, and pay their respects to the gentle, big-hearted giant of the horse racing world.

Pictured: Phar Lap with jockey Jim Pike riding at Flemington race track c 1930.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » November 7, 2020, 6:09 pm

Well shag me like a Rabbit!! AUS 24 vs NZ 22 in the latest Bledisloe :guitar: :guitar: :yikes:

https://wwos.nine.com.au/rugby/bledislo ... 8f930e87dc

pipoz4444
Last edited by pipoz4444 on November 7, 2020, 10:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by papafarang » November 7, 2020, 7:09 pm

Barney wrote:
November 4, 2020, 9:24 am
On this day, 4th November 1930, Australia's greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, wins the Melbourne Cup.

Phar Lap, a giant chestnut thoroughbred gelding, standing 17.1 hands high, is regarded by many to be Australia's and New Zealand's greatest racehorse. A much loved Australian national icon, he was actually born and bred in Timaru, in the South Island of New Zealand, but never raced in New Zealand.

The name Phar Lap was derived from the shared Zhuang and Thai word for lightning. According to the Museum Victoria, medical student Aubrey Ping often visited the track in Randwick, talking with riders and trainers. He had learned some Zhuang from his father, who migrated to Australia from southern China. He reputedly suggested "Farlap" as the horse's name. Sydney trainer Harry Telford liked the name, but changed the F to a Ph to create a seven-letter word, and split it into two words, so as to replicate the dominant pattern set by Melbourne Cup winners.

Phar Lap dominated the racing scene in Australia during a long and distinguished career. In the four years of his racing career, he won 37 of 51 races he entered. During 1930 and 1931, he won 14 races in a row. On 4 November 1930, ridden by Jimmy Pike, Phar Lap won the Melbourne Cup. He started as the shortest-priced favourite in the history of the race at odds of 8–11, having finished third in 1929.

Phar Lap died in April 1932. A necropsy revealed that the horse's stomach and intestines were inflamed, and many believed he had been deliberately poisoned. A variety of theories have been propounded over the years. In 2006 Australian Synchrotron Research scientists said it was almost certain Phar Lap was poisoned with a large single dose of arsenic 35 hours before he died, supporting the belief that Phar Lap was killed on the orders of US gangsters, who feared the Melbourne-Cup-winning champion would inflict big losses on their illegal bookmakers.

Phar Lap's heart was a remarkable size, weighing 6.2 kg, compared with a normal horse's heart at 3.2 kg. Phar Lap's heart is now held at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. It is consistently the display visitors request most often to see, and pay their respects to the gentle, big-hearted giant of the horse racing world.

Pictured: Phar Lap with jockey Jim Pike riding at Flemington race track c 1930.

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I had the exact same photo signed by the trainer .got left in a Thai building. It was in a frame with some kind of certificate proving it was an original print with an original autograph that was numbered. Sadly I know nothing about racing and from what I understand a local labourer took it to sell the frame and put the picture in the bin. Sad waste of an historical document
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Whistler » November 7, 2020, 8:33 pm

Don't forget Tommy Woodcock who was the great horse's companion. For those interested, A great movie was made some years ago which I am sure is downloadable from one of the totally 100% legal torrent sites on the web.

Once again, thank you Barney.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » November 10, 2020, 8:46 am

On this day, 10th November 1791, the whaling industry in Australia, in which whales in Australian waters would be nearly hunted to extinction, begins.

The whaling industry in Australia began on 10 November 1791, just three years after the First Fleet arrived on Australian shores. Samuel Enderby Jnr, born in 1756 in England, was the son of Samuel Enderby, who established the whaling and sealing firm of Samuel Enderby & Sons. In 1791, Enderby Jnr arranged for whalers to carry convicts to Port Jackson in the Third Fleet, following reports from earlier captains of masses of whales in the southern oceans. Thus began the whaling industry which hunted the southern right whale virtually to extinction within just fifty years. One hundred and fifty years later, the humpback whale suffered the same fate.

It is only in more recent years that animal protection laws have allowed the whale numbers to increase. However, whales in southern waters are once again at risk from Japanese whalers who continue to flout the resolutions of the International Whaling Commission.

Pictured: Oswald Brierly, Whalers off Twofold Bay, New South Wales, 1867. Art Gallery of New South Wales
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Sport » November 10, 2020, 10:42 am

Thanks Barney, the big E, for posting this. I lived in Eden (Twofold Bay) for a few years and accumulated a bit of knowledge of the whaling industry. I lived with a couple, the Mitchell's, who had family involved in that industry, their books on the whaling and Eden are in the Mitchell Library in Sydney NSW.

Just a small piece of that industry. Tom Mead and Mary Mitchell wrote very good books on the whaling, Mary gave me a copy of her book as well as Tom Mead's book. The pod led by Tom would guide the whalers to the killing grounds by day or night, first time this ever happened by night. When the baleen whales were killed, the killer pod would eat the tongue and lips of the carcass, still happens today in the wild. The Davidson family set up a Try works near Eden to render down the blubber.

When the killer whale Tom was dying, he made his way back to the shores of the Eden township and passed away. His skeleton is now in the Eden museum and part of his jaw where he would drag the whaling boat by a large rope is clearly visible. I believe when Tom was dying, he should not have been in that area of the Australian coastline, should have been in Antarctica, a certain mystery.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by stattointhailand » November 10, 2020, 1:41 pm

Love all the old pics

One of my distant cousins went missing from Day Dawn in 1909, and is presumed to have perished in the outback. It is assumed his body (what was left of it) was found under a gum tree near lake Austin 20 yrs later and buried under the gum tree.. It is thought they either were killed for their camels & mining gear or had died from some disease.
Day Dawn W Australia c1905 from thedustybox.jpg
Alfred Credgington disappearence in Outback from Daily News 16 Apr 1910.jpg
Alfred Credgington disappearence in Outback from Daily News 16 Apr 1910.jpg (64.69 KiB) Viewed 87 times
Alfred Credgington Gum tree from Daily News Perth W Australia 10 Feb 1932.jpg

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » November 15, 2020, 3:10 pm


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