Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

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dunroaming
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by dunroaming » September 16, 2020, 9:44 am

Alfie 215 baht has to be farmed and poisonous, be careful my friend it might stop your goal of living to 150



DuiDui49
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 16, 2020, 10:03 am

dunroaming wrote:
September 16, 2020, 9:44 am
Alfie 215 baht has to be farmed and poisonous, be careful my friend it might stop your goal of living to 150
I'm 62 now and nearly all of my relatives lived to between 84-->94,my aim,eating farmed food or not is 93..reasons for that i keep for myself ;-)BUT,if not that word excisted and i was living back home in Sweden far up in the cold North may just maybe i would reach that goal...BUT,i'm in Thailand now so i go day by day,for how long is in Gods hands only ;-)

Have a great day my friend..:-)
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

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lassebasse
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by lassebasse » September 16, 2020, 6:31 pm

After seeing a movie about pangasius in Vietnam I stopped eating that fish and then I showed the movie to my wife and even she stopped eating pangasius. Never seen the chinese cod but a few times a was lucky to find cod from the north sea.

DuiDui49
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 16, 2020, 6:44 pm

lassebasse wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:31 pm
After seeing a movie about pangasius in Vietnam I stopped eating that fish and then I showed the movie to my wife and even she stopped eating pangasius. Never seen the chinese cod but a few times a was lucky to find cod from the north sea.
Educate yourself LB:

6 of the Healthiest Fish to Eat
According to Seafood Watch, here are six fish that are healthy for you and the planet.

1. Albacore Tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the US or British Columbia)

Many tuna are high in mercury but albacore tuna–the kind of white tuna that’s commonly canned–gets a Super Green rating as long as (and this is the clincher) it is “troll- or pole-caught” in the US or British Columbia. The reason: Smaller (usually less than 20 pounds), younger fish are typically caught this way (as opposed to the larger fish caught on longlines). These fish have much lower mercury and contaminant ratings and those caught in colder northern waters often have higher omega-3 counts. The challenge: You need to do your homework to know how your fish was caught or look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) blue eco label.

2. Salmon (wild-caught, Alaska)

To give you an idea of how well-managed Alaska’s salmon fishery is, consider this: Biologists are posted at river mouths to count how many wild fish return to spawn. If the numbers begin to dwindle, the fishery is closed before it reaches its limits, as was done recently with some Chinook fisheries. This close monitoring, along with strict quotas and careful management of water quality, means Alaska’s wild-caught salmon are both healthier (they pack 1,210 mg of omega-3s per 3-ounce serving and carry few contaminants) and more sustainable than just about any other salmon fishery.

3. Oysters (farmed)

Farmed oysters are good for you (a 3-ounce serving contains over 300 mg of omega-3s and about a third of the recommended daily values of iron). Better yet, they are actually good for the environment. Oysters feed off the natural nutrients and algae in the water, which improves water quality. They can also act as natural reefs, attracting and providing food for other fish. One health caveat: Raw shellfish, especially those from warm waters, may contain bacteria that can cause illnesses.

4. Sardines, Pacific (wild-caught)

The tiny, inexpensive sardine is making it onto many lists of superfoods and for good reason. It packs more omega-3s (1,950 mg!) per 3-ounce serving than salmon, tuna, or just about any other food; it’s also one of the very, very few foods that’s naturally high in vitamin D. Many fish in the herring family are commonly called sardines. Quick to reproduce, Pacific sardines have rebounded from both overfishing and a natural collapse in the 1940s.

5. Rainbow Trout (farmed)

Though lake trout are high in contaminants, nearly all the trout you will find in the market is farmed rainbow trout. In the US, rainbow trout are farmed primarily in freshwater ponds and “raceways” where they are more protected from contaminants and fed a fish meal diet that has been fine-tuned to conserve resources.

6. Freshwater Coho Salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the US)

Freshwater coho salmon is the first–and only–farmed salmon to get a Super Green rating. All other farmed salmon still falls on Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch “avoid” list for a few reasons. Many farms use crowded pens where salmon are easily infected with parasites, may be treated with antibiotics, and can spread disease to wild fish (one reason Alaska has banned salmon farms). Also, it can take as much as three pounds of wild fish to raise one pound of salmon. Coho, however, are raised in closed freshwater pens and require less feed, so the environmental impacts are reduced. They’re also a healthy source of omega-3s–one 3-ounce serving delivers 1,025 mg.

6 Fish to Avoid
A number of environmental organizations have advocated taking many fish off the menu. The large fish listed below are just six examples of popular fish that are both depleted and, in many cases, carry higher levels of mercury and PCBs. The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has also posted health advisories on some of these fish at edf.org.

1. Bluefin Tuna

In December 2009, the World Wildlife Fund put the bluefin tuna on its “10 for 2010” list of threatened species, alongside the giant panda, tigers, and leatherback turtles. Though environmental groups are advocating for protected status, the bluefin continues to command as much as $177,000 a fish. Bluefin have high levels of mercury and their PCBs are so high that EDF recommends not eating this fish at all.

2. Chilean Sea Bass (aka Patagonian Toothfish)

Slow-growing and prized for its buttery meat, Chilean sea bass has been fished to near depletion in its native cold Antarctic waters. The methods used to catch them–trawlers and longlines–have also damaged the ocean floor and hooked albatross and other seabirds. At present, there is one well-managed fishery that is MSC-certified. EDF has issued a consumption advisory for Chilean sea bass due to high mercury levels: Adults should eat no more than two meals per month and children 12 and younger should eat it no more than once a month.

3. Grouper

High mercury levels in these giant fish have caused EDF to issue a consumption advisory. Groupers can live to be 40 but only reproduce over a short amount of time, making them vulnerable to overfishing.

4. Monkfish

This strange fish resembles a catfish in that it has whiskers and is a bottom-dweller, but its light, fresh taste made it a staple for gourmets. The fish is recovering some after being depleted, but the trawlers that drag for it also threaten the habitat where it lives.

5. Orange Roughy

Like grouper, this fish lives a long life but is slow to reproduce, making it vulnerable to overfishing. As Seafood Watch puts it: “Orange roughy lives 100 years or more–so the fillet in your freezer might be from a fish older than your grandmother!” This also means it has high levels of mercury, causing EDF to issue a health advisory.

6. Salmon (farmed)

Most farmed salmon (and all salmon labeled “Atlantic salmon” is farmed) are raised in tightly packed, open-net pens often rife with parasites and diseases that threaten the wild salmon trying to swim by to their ancestral spawning waters. Farmed salmon are fed fish meal, given antibiotics to combat diseases and have levels of PCBs high enough to rate a health advisory from EDF. Recently, however, freshwater-farmed coho salmon have earned a Best Choice status from Seafood Watch. Consumer pressure may encourage more farms to adopt better practices.

"
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

dunroaming
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Posts: 1364
Joined: July 14, 2009, 1:34 pm

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by dunroaming » September 16, 2020, 6:50 pm

DuiDui49 wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:44 pm
lassebasse wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:31 pm
After seeing a movie about pangasius in Vietnam I stopped eating that fish and then I showed the movie to my wife and even she stopped eating pangasius. Never seen the chinese cod but a few times a was lucky to find cod from the north sea.
Educate yourself LB:

6 of the Healthiest Fish to Eat
According to Seafood Watch, here are six fish that are healthy for you and the planet.

1. Albacore Tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the US or British Columbia)

Many tuna are high in mercury but albacore tuna–the kind of white tuna that’s commonly canned–gets a Super Green rating as long as (and this is the clincher) it is “troll- or pole-caught” in the US or British Columbia. The reason: Smaller (usually less than 20 pounds), younger fish are typically caught this way (as opposed to the larger fish caught on longlines). These fish have much lower mercury and contaminant ratings and those caught in colder northern waters often have higher omega-3 counts. The challenge: You need to do your homework to know how your fish was caught or look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) blue eco label.

2. Salmon (wild-caught, Alaska)

To give you an idea of how well-managed Alaska’s salmon fishery is, consider this: Biologists are posted at river mouths to count how many wild fish return to spawn. If the numbers begin to dwindle, the fishery is closed before it reaches its limits, as was done recently with some Chinook fisheries. This close monitoring, along with strict quotas and careful management of water quality, means Alaska’s wild-caught salmon are both healthier (they pack 1,210 mg of omega-3s per 3-ounce serving and carry few contaminants) and more sustainable than just about any other salmon fishery.

3. Oysters (farmed)

Farmed oysters are good for you (a 3-ounce serving contains over 300 mg of omega-3s and about a third of the recommended daily values of iron). Better yet, they are actually good for the environment. Oysters feed off the natural nutrients and algae in the water, which improves water quality. They can also act as natural reefs, attracting and providing food for other fish. One health caveat: Raw shellfish, especially those from warm waters, may contain bacteria that can cause illnesses.

4. Sardines, Pacific (wild-caught)

The tiny, inexpensive sardine is making it onto many lists of superfoods and for good reason. It packs more omega-3s (1,950 mg!) per 3-ounce serving than salmon, tuna, or just about any other food; it’s also one of the very, very few foods that’s naturally high in vitamin D. Many fish in the herring family are commonly called sardines. Quick to reproduce, Pacific sardines have rebounded from both overfishing and a natural collapse in the 1940s.

5. Rainbow Trout (farmed)

Though lake trout are high in contaminants, nearly all the trout you will find in the market is farmed rainbow trout. In the US, rainbow trout are farmed primarily in freshwater ponds and “raceways” where they are more protected from contaminants and fed a fish meal diet that has been fine-tuned to conserve resources.

6. Freshwater Coho Salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the US)

Freshwater coho salmon is the first–and only–farmed salmon to get a Super Green rating. All other farmed salmon still falls on Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch “avoid” list for a few reasons. Many farms use crowded pens where salmon are easily infected with parasites, may be treated with antibiotics, and can spread disease to wild fish (one reason Alaska has banned salmon farms). Also, it can take as much as three pounds of wild fish to raise one pound of salmon. Coho, however, are raised in closed freshwater pens and require less feed, so the environmental impacts are reduced. They’re also a healthy source of omega-3s–one 3-ounce serving delivers 1,025 mg.

6 Fish to Avoid
A number of environmental organizations have advocated taking many fish off the menu. The large fish listed below are just six examples of popular fish that are both depleted and, in many cases, carry higher levels of mercury and PCBs. The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has also posted health advisories on some of these fish at edf.org.

1. Bluefin Tuna

In December 2009, the World Wildlife Fund put the bluefin tuna on its “10 for 2010” list of threatened species, alongside the giant panda, tigers, and leatherback turtles. Though environmental groups are advocating for protected status, the bluefin continues to command as much as $177,000 a fish. Bluefin have high levels of mercury and their PCBs are so high that EDF recommends not eating this fish at all.

2. Chilean Sea Bass (aka Patagonian Toothfish)

Slow-growing and prized for its buttery meat, Chilean sea bass has been fished to near depletion in its native cold Antarctic waters. The methods used to catch them–trawlers and longlines–have also damaged the ocean floor and hooked albatross and other seabirds. At present, there is one well-managed fishery that is MSC-certified. EDF has issued a consumption advisory for Chilean sea bass due to high mercury levels: Adults should eat no more than two meals per month and children 12 and younger should eat it no more than once a month.

3. Grouper

High mercury levels in these giant fish have caused EDF to issue a consumption advisory. Groupers can live to be 40 but only reproduce over a short amount of time, making them vulnerable to overfishing.

4. Monkfish

This strange fish resembles a catfish in that it has whiskers and is a bottom-dweller, but its light, fresh taste made it a staple for gourmets. The fish is recovering some after being depleted, but the trawlers that drag for it also threaten the habitat where it lives.

5. Orange Roughy

Like grouper, this fish lives a long life but is slow to reproduce, making it vulnerable to overfishing. As Seafood Watch puts it: “Orange roughy lives 100 years or more–so the fillet in your freezer might be from a fish older than your grandmother!” This also means it has high levels of mercury, causing EDF to issue a health advisory.

6. Salmon (farmed)

Most farmed salmon (and all salmon labeled “Atlantic salmon” is farmed) are raised in tightly packed, open-net pens often rife with parasites and diseases that threaten the wild salmon trying to swim by to their ancestral spawning waters. Farmed salmon are fed fish meal, given antibiotics to combat diseases and have levels of PCBs high enough to rate a health advisory from EDF. Recently, however, freshwater-farmed coho salmon have earned a Best Choice status from Seafood Watch. Consumer pressure may encourage more farms to adopt better practices.

"
Ah well with your healthy food only and on your budget enjoy a life of sardines

DuiDui49
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Posts: 1151
Joined: March 15, 2006, 3:10 pm
Location: Koh Samui

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 16, 2020, 7:25 pm

dunroaming wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:50 pm
DuiDui49 wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:44 pm
lassebasse wrote:
September 16, 2020, 6:31 pm
After seeing a movie about pangasius in Vietnam I stopped eating that fish and then I showed the movie to my wife and even she stopped eating pangasius. Never seen the chinese cod but a few times a was lucky to find cod from the north sea.
Educate yourself LB:

6 of the Healthiest Fish to Eat
According to Seafood Watch, here are six fish that are healthy for you and the planet.

1. Albacore Tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the US or British Columbia)

Many tuna are high in mercury but albacore tuna–the kind of white tuna that’s commonly canned–gets a Super Green rating as long as (and this is the clincher) it is “troll- or pole-caught” in the US or British Columbia. The reason: Smaller (usually less than 20 pounds), younger fish are typically caught this way (as opposed to the larger fish caught on longlines). These fish have much lower mercury and contaminant ratings and those caught in colder northern waters often have higher omega-3 counts. The challenge: You need to do your homework to know how your fish was caught or look for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) blue eco label.

2. Salmon (wild-caught, Alaska)

To give you an idea of how well-managed Alaska’s salmon fishery is, consider this: Biologists are posted at river mouths to count how many wild fish return to spawn. If the numbers begin to dwindle, the fishery is closed before it reaches its limits, as was done recently with some Chinook fisheries. This close monitoring, along with strict quotas and careful management of water quality, means Alaska’s wild-caught salmon are both healthier (they pack 1,210 mg of omega-3s per 3-ounce serving and carry few contaminants) and more sustainable than just about any other salmon fishery.

3. Oysters (farmed)

Farmed oysters are good for you (a 3-ounce serving contains over 300 mg of omega-3s and about a third of the recommended daily values of iron). Better yet, they are actually good for the environment. Oysters feed off the natural nutrients and algae in the water, which improves water quality. They can also act as natural reefs, attracting and providing food for other fish. One health caveat: Raw shellfish, especially those from warm waters, may contain bacteria that can cause illnesses.

4. Sardines, Pacific (wild-caught)

The tiny, inexpensive sardine is making it onto many lists of superfoods and for good reason. It packs more omega-3s (1,950 mg!) per 3-ounce serving than salmon, tuna, or just about any other food; it’s also one of the very, very few foods that’s naturally high in vitamin D. Many fish in the herring family are commonly called sardines. Quick to reproduce, Pacific sardines have rebounded from both overfishing and a natural collapse in the 1940s.

5. Rainbow Trout (farmed)

Though lake trout are high in contaminants, nearly all the trout you will find in the market is farmed rainbow trout. In the US, rainbow trout are farmed primarily in freshwater ponds and “raceways” where they are more protected from contaminants and fed a fish meal diet that has been fine-tuned to conserve resources.

6. Freshwater Coho Salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the US)

Freshwater coho salmon is the first–and only–farmed salmon to get a Super Green rating. All other farmed salmon still falls on Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch “avoid” list for a few reasons. Many farms use crowded pens where salmon are easily infected with parasites, may be treated with antibiotics, and can spread disease to wild fish (one reason Alaska has banned salmon farms). Also, it can take as much as three pounds of wild fish to raise one pound of salmon. Coho, however, are raised in closed freshwater pens and require less feed, so the environmental impacts are reduced. They’re also a healthy source of omega-3s–one 3-ounce serving delivers 1,025 mg.

6 Fish to Avoid
A number of environmental organizations have advocated taking many fish off the menu. The large fish listed below are just six examples of popular fish that are both depleted and, in many cases, carry higher levels of mercury and PCBs. The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has also posted health advisories on some of these fish at edf.org.

1. Bluefin Tuna

In December 2009, the World Wildlife Fund put the bluefin tuna on its “10 for 2010” list of threatened species, alongside the giant panda, tigers, and leatherback turtles. Though environmental groups are advocating for protected status, the bluefin continues to command as much as $177,000 a fish. Bluefin have high levels of mercury and their PCBs are so high that EDF recommends not eating this fish at all.

2. Chilean Sea Bass (aka Patagonian Toothfish)

Slow-growing and prized for its buttery meat, Chilean sea bass has been fished to near depletion in its native cold Antarctic waters. The methods used to catch them–trawlers and longlines–have also damaged the ocean floor and hooked albatross and other seabirds. At present, there is one well-managed fishery that is MSC-certified. EDF has issued a consumption advisory for Chilean sea bass due to high mercury levels: Adults should eat no more than two meals per month and children 12 and younger should eat it no more than once a month.

3. Grouper

High mercury levels in these giant fish have caused EDF to issue a consumption advisory. Groupers can live to be 40 but only reproduce over a short amount of time, making them vulnerable to overfishing.

4. Monkfish

This strange fish resembles a catfish in that it has whiskers and is a bottom-dweller, but its light, fresh taste made it a staple for gourmets. The fish is recovering some after being depleted, but the trawlers that drag for it also threaten the habitat where it lives.

5. Orange Roughy

Like grouper, this fish lives a long life but is slow to reproduce, making it vulnerable to overfishing. As Seafood Watch puts it: “Orange roughy lives 100 years or more–so the fillet in your freezer might be from a fish older than your grandmother!” This also means it has high levels of mercury, causing EDF to issue a health advisory.

6. Salmon (farmed)

Most farmed salmon (and all salmon labeled “Atlantic salmon” is farmed) are raised in tightly packed, open-net pens often rife with parasites and diseases that threaten the wild salmon trying to swim by to their ancestral spawning waters. Farmed salmon are fed fish meal, given antibiotics to combat diseases and have levels of PCBs high enough to rate a health advisory from EDF. Recently, however, freshwater-farmed coho salmon have earned a Best Choice status from Seafood Watch. Consumer pressure may encourage more farms to adopt better practices.

"
Ah well with your healthy food only and on your budget enjoy a life of sardines
A smart man does not throw away his money..on crapfood..he does his own and btw,sardines are one of the healthyer and cheaper foods..sardines on crispbread..jummy..And when it comes to food that's were my money goes,same with my dogs..Purina chicken..not full of fillers that get dogs stomach all bloated..but i guess you as an very rich man eating Gelprawns that makes you glow in the dark knows that already..*sarcasm*
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

dunroaming
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Posts: 1364
Joined: July 14, 2009, 1:34 pm

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by dunroaming » September 16, 2020, 9:59 pm

Actually not rich at all, but I don't preach what's right or wrong and I believe each to their own. I also understand the concept live to your means. Sardines sorry don't like skin and bones but the dogs and wife love them 🤣 haven't told them in the old days the amount of rats and mice that ended up in the cans by mistake

DuiDui49
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Posts: 1151
Joined: March 15, 2006, 3:10 pm
Location: Koh Samui

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 17, 2020, 7:00 am

dunroaming wrote:
September 16, 2020, 9:59 pm
Actually not rich at all, but I don't preach what's right or wrong and I believe each to their own. I also understand the concept live to your means. Sardines sorry don't like skin and bones but the dogs and wife love them 🤣 haven't told them in the old days the amount of rats and mice that ended up in the cans by mistake
God morning !

Just don't read my post then,easy enough for you..not??

Have an awsome day sir...by the way...i don't have rat in my home,neither in my sardines cans..;-)..but SNAKES :shock: :shock:
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

dunroaming
udonmap.com
Posts: 1364
Joined: July 14, 2009, 1:34 pm

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by dunroaming » September 19, 2020, 5:36 pm


User avatar
AlexO
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by AlexO » September 19, 2020, 8:12 pm

DuiDui49 wrote:
September 17, 2020, 7:00 am
dunroaming wrote:
September 16, 2020, 9:59 pm
Actually not rich at all, but I don't preach what's right or wrong and I believe each to their own. I also understand the concept live to your means. Sardines sorry don't like skin and bones but the dogs and wife love them 🤣 haven't told them in the old days the amount of rats and mice that ended up in the cans by mistake
God morning !

Just don't read my post then,easy enough for you..not??

Have an awsome day sir...by the way...i don't have rat in my home,neither in my sardines cans..;-)..but SNAKES :shock: :shock:
How many snakes do you get in a 3 ounce serving.

DuiDui49
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Posts: 1151
Joined: March 15, 2006, 3:10 pm
Location: Koh Samui

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 20, 2020, 10:54 am

AlexO wrote:
September 19, 2020, 8:12 pm
DuiDui49 wrote:
September 17, 2020, 7:00 am
dunroaming wrote:
September 16, 2020, 9:59 pm
Actually not rich at all, but I don't preach what's right or wrong and I believe each to their own. I also understand the concept live to your means. Sardines sorry don't like skin and bones but the dogs and wife love them 🤣 haven't told them in the old days the amount of rats and mice that ended up in the cans by mistake
God morning !

Just don't read my post then,easy enough for you..not??

Have an awsome day sir...by the way...i don't have rat in my home,neither in my sardines cans..;-)..but SNAKES :shock: :shock:
How many snakes do you get in a 3 ounce serving.
God morning!

Well,let me put it like this..Sardines goes on crisp (WASA Hurtig)bread,snakes goes under the stair to my house eating his rat meal...everyone happy...;-)Have a good day AO..:-)
Last edited by DuiDui49 on September 20, 2020, 5:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

jackspratt
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Posts: 11835
Joined: July 2, 2006, 5:29 pm

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by jackspratt » September 20, 2020, 4:29 pm

DuiDui49 wrote:
September 20, 2020, 10:54 am

God morning!

Well,let me put it like this..Sardines goes on crisp (WASA Hurtig)bread,snakes goes under the stair to my house eating his rat meal...everyone happy...;-)Have a good day AO..:-)
?

Perhaps stick to standard black font. 👍

choi choi
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Posts: 531
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by choi choi » September 20, 2020, 5:26 pm

That make me dizzy to read ! :D

DuiDui49
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Posts: 1151
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 20, 2020, 5:27 pm

jackspratt wrote:
September 20, 2020, 4:29 pm
DuiDui49 wrote:
September 20, 2020, 10:54 am

God morning!

Well,let me put it like this..Sardines goes on crisp (WASA Hurtig)bread,snakes goes under the stair to my house eating his rat meal...everyone happy...;-)Have a good day AO..:-)
/b]


?

Perhaps stick to standard black font. 👍


Agree,but underline it works ;-)
Last edited by DuiDui49 on September 21, 2020, 8:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

glalt
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by glalt » September 20, 2020, 9:17 pm

I always thought that farm raised fish were the answer for healthy fish eating. Then I saw the documentaries showing Norwegian farmed salmon and Vietnamese fish farms. Watching those documentaries gave me the willies. Upcountry Thailand fish farms look much safer.

choi choi
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Posts: 531
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Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by choi choi » September 20, 2020, 10:10 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYYf8cLUV5E
Yes that looks dodgy! I never eat salmon .Too expensive!

DuiDui49
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Posts: 1151
Joined: March 15, 2006, 3:10 pm
Location: Koh Samui

Re: Were to get NON FARMED FISH..

Post by DuiDui49 » September 21, 2020, 8:06 am

jackspratt wrote:
September 20, 2020, 4:29 pm
DuiDui49 wrote:
September 20, 2020, 10:54 am

God morning!

Well,let me put it like this..Sardines goes on crisp (WASA Hurtig)bread,snakes goes under the stair to my house eating his rat meal...everyone happy...;-)Have a good day AO..:-)
?

Perhaps stick to standard black font. 👍
Best regards
//DuiDui
"Exercise is individual and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom."

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues but the parent of all others.” 

"To grow and mature demands time and willingness to learn from your own misstakes"

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