Yes it really happened

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karonsteve
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by karonsteve » July 19, 2020, 1:25 pm




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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 20, 2020, 12:57 am

CAMBODIA
1
Cambodia has the largest population of amputees in the world caused by landmines. Over 64,000 casualties related to landmines have been recorded since 1979. Almost half of the landmines are yet to be removed.

2
Evidence from carbon dating suggests that Cambodia was inhabited as early as 4000 B.C.

3
Kids take note that apart from Afghanistan’s national flag, the national flag of Cambodia is the only other national flag in the world to incorporate an actual building on it.

4
The garment and footwear sector in Cambodia is also among the top sectors that support the nation’s economy. More than 600,000 Cambodians are employed in these two sectors, the majority of whom are women.

5
Cambodia is losing forests very fast. The rate of deforestation in Cambodia is one of the highest in the world, third only to Nigeria and Vietnam. Between 2001 and 2014, the annual forest loss rate in Cambodia increased by 14.4 percent. The main reason behind this heavy deforestation is the illegal cutting of the forest by smugglers for monetary gains from the valuable timber.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 21, 2020, 5:50 am

TURKEY
1
Istanbul‘s Grand Bazaar, or Kapalı Çarşı, dates to 1455 and was established shortly after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. Over the centuries it has grown into a warren of 61 streets lined by more than 3,000 shops and currently occupies a nearly incomprehensible 333,000 square feet. You’ll never possibly be able to explore it all, but that doesn’t keep people from trying — according to Travel + Leisure, the Grand Bazaar was the world’s #1 attraction in 2014, drawing over 91 million people.

2
You might find chicken in your dessert.The signature Ottoman treat is tavuk göğsü, or chicken breast pudding. It’s a strange blend of boiled chicken, milk, and sugar, dusted with cinnamon. And it’s delicious. Look for it on menus across the country.

3
Turkey gifted tulips to the world (you’re welcome, Netherlands).
It’s uncertain where the first tulips were grown, but what is known is that the Ottomans popularized the flower and facilitated their introduction to Europe. A simultaneous export? Tulipmania. The seeds of the world’s first speculative bubble were sown when a Flemish ambassador to the 16th-century court of Süleyman the Magnificent brought back the bulbous flowers to Holland. Other commodities for which Europe owes a debt of gratitude to Turkey are coffee and cherries.

4
Oil wrestling is the national sport.
The spectacle of two bulky men stripped to the waist, doused with olive oil, and grappling under the hot Thracian sun is a 654-year-old sporting tradition and sight to behold. Camel wrestling tournaments, held throughout the Aegean region in the winter, and bull wrestling near the Black Sea, are also popular.

5
It’s home to some of the most important sites in Christendom.
Turkey’s population may be 99% Muslim, but these lands draw tens of thousands of Christian pilgrims each year. The Ecumenical Patriarch, spiritual leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox, lives in Istanbul, a vestige of the Byzantine Empire. The grotto dug by the Apostle Peter in Antioch was the first Christian house of worship, while a 1st-century patriarchal church is said to have been located underground in today’s unprepossessing Istanbul district of Fındıklı. Istanbul is also home to the 1,500-year-old Hagia Sophia cathedral, now a museum. And the Armenian Apostolic Church was founded 1,700 years ago in what’s today the city of Kayseri.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 22, 2020, 5:58 am

ICE CREAM


1
There are two dozen attractions within Tokyo’s indoor amusement park, Namja Town, but it would be easy to spend all of your time there pondering the many out-there flavors at Ice Cream City, where Raw Horse Flesh, Cow Tongue, Salt, Yakisoba, Octopus, and Squid are among the flavors that have tickled (or strangled) visitors' taste buds.

2
PICKLED MANGO
As one of the country’s most decorated ice cream makers, Jeni Britton Bauer—proprietor of Ohio-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams—is constantly pushing the boundaries of unique treats, as evidenced by her lineup of limited edition flavors, including last summer's Pickled Mango (a cream cheese-based ice cream with a slightly spicy mango sauce made of white balsamic vinegar, white pepper, allspice, and clove) and this year's Goat Cheese With Red Cherries.

3
Since opening Max & Mina’s in Queens, New York in 1998, brothers/owners Bruce and Mark Becker have created more than 5000 one-of-a-kind ice cream flavors, many of them adapted from their grandfather’s original recipes. Daily flavor experiments mean that the menu is ever-changing, but Corn on the Cob (a summer favorite), Horseradish, Garlic, Pizza, Lox, and Jalapeño have all made the lineup.

4
PEAR AND BLUE CHEESE
“Salty-sweet” is the preferred palette at Portland, Oregon-based Salt & Straw, where sugar and spice blend together nicely with flavors like Strawberry Honey Balsamic Strawberry With Cracked Pepper and Pear With Blue Cheese, a well-balanced mix of sweet Oregon Trail Bartlett Pears mixed with crumbles of Rogue Creamery's award-winning Crater Lake Blue Cheese. Yum?

5
BOURBON AND CORN FLAKE
You never know exactly which flavors will appear as part of the daily-changing lineup at San Francisco’s Humphry Slocombe, but they always make room for the signature Secret Breakfast. Made with bourbon and Corn Flakes, you’d better get there early if you want to try it; it sells out quickly and on a daily basis.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 23, 2020, 5:55 am

1
65% of the highways in Germany (Autobahn) have no speed limit.

2
There are over 2100 castles in Germany.

3
There are over 1,500 different beers in Germany.

4
Germany shares borders with nine other countries. Denmark, Poland, the Czech Republic, Austria, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

5
The first printed book was in German.
Germany is one of the world’s leading book nations. Publishing around 94,000 titles every year.
The first magazine ever seen was launched in 1663 in Germany.
6
Germany has over 400 zoos, the most in the world.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 24, 2020, 6:00 am

RUSSIA

1
Russia's greatest museum - The Hermitage, also in St Petersburg - is home to around 70 cats, which guard its treasures against rodents. The tradition dates back to a 1745 decree of Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great, founder of St. Petersburg. The museum also has almost 14 miles of marbled corridors.

2
Giving flowers to residents can be a delicate point of etiquette. You should always make sure you give them in odd numbers, unless going to a funeral, when even numbers are the rule.

3
Russians are the world's fourth biggest drinkers, according to WHO statistics, behind Belarus, Moldova and Lithuania. Britain comes 25th

4
Traffic in Moscow is so bad that wealthy Russians hire fake ambulances to beat the jams.

5
Looking for a Wife?
There are around 11 million more women than men.

6
It appears Thailand is not the only place in charging Expats more
Foreigners pay a higher entrance fee at many tourist sites. It’s unfair, but there’s nothing you can do, and there is little point in complaining. Best to laugh it off, and picture Roman Abramovich paying five times less than you under the “discounts for Russian citizens” scheme.

7
In the late 1980's, the Russians did what any country would do in desperate times: They traded Pepsi a fleet of subs and boats for a whole lot of soda. The new agreement included 17 submarines, a cruiser, a frigate, and a destroyer.
The combined fleet was traded for three billion dollars worth of Pepsi. Yes, you read that right. Russia loves their Pepsi.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 25, 2020, 7:32 am

DISCOVERED BY ACCIDENT
1
Penicillin
Penicillin was discovered by accident in 1928, when bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned from vacation to find that mould had grown on some of his petri dishes—and interrupted the growth of the bacteria placed there. After 14 years of painstaking work, Fleming and his colleagues developed the first antibiotic. Since then, it has saved millions of lives around the world.

2
Chocolate chip cookies
One of America’s most iconic sweet treats was invented by accident in 1938. Ruth Wakefield, the co-owner and cook of the Toll House Inn in Whitman, Mass., broke a chocolate bar into a bowl of cookie batter one night, thinking that it would melt and produce chocolate cookies. Instead, the chocolate chip cookie was born.

3
The microwave
One day in 1946, Percy Spencer, a resourceful engineer with little formal education, was working on a magnetron, a tool used to generate radar waves. He noticed that a candy bar in his pocket had melted. “Intrigued, he set out for unpopped popcorn,” recounts the New England Historical Society. When the popcorn popped, Spencer realized what he had. The first microwaves were 1.67 m (5’6”) tall, weighed 340 kilograms (750 pounds), cost $3,000, and, perhaps unsurprisingly, were a commercial failure. However, by 1975—five years after Spencer’s death—more microwaves were sold in the U.S. than gas stoves.

4
Cornflakes
Cornflakes were accidentally created in 1898 when a batch of wheat-based dough was left out overnight at a sanitarium in Michigan where physician and clean-living evangelist John Kellogg was experimenting with baked grains. “When rolled out into thin sheets, the slightly moldy dough produced perfect large, thin flakes that became crispy and tasty in the oven,” the History Channel explains. Later, corn dough was found to produce even crispier flakes, and the rest is history.

5
The Slinky
The Slinky was invented by accident, by an engineer working on tools to keep sensitive equipment secure at sea. The engineer, Richard James, accidentally knocked some springs off a shelf and was amazed when they “walked” gracefully down to the floor. James and his wife, Betty, hatched a plan to mass-produce the springs and turn them into the next great toy. The Slinky was a Christmas hit in 1945 and is still sold today. Slinkys have also been used as birdfeeder protectors and emergency radio antennas.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 26, 2020, 7:30 am

1
Scientists identified Marburg virus in 1967, when small outbreaks occurred among lab workers in Germany who were exposed to infected monkeys imported from Uganda. Marburg virus is similar to Ebola in that both can cause hemorrhagic fever, meaning that infected people develop high fevers and bleeding throughout the body that can lead to shock, organ failure and death.

The mortality rate in the first outbreak was 25%, but it was more than 80% in the 1998-2000 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, as well as in the 2005 outbreak in Angola, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

2
The first known Ebola outbreaks in humans struck simultaneously in the Republic of the Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1976. Ebola is spread through contact with blood or other body fluids, or tissue from infected people or animals. The known strains vary dramatically in their deadliness, Elke Muhlberger, an Ebola virus expert and associate professor of microbiology at Boston University, told Live Science.
One strain, Ebola Reston, doesn't even make people sick. But for the Bundibugyo strain, the fatality rate is up to 50%, and it is up to 71% for the Sudan strain, according to WHO.

3
Although rabies vaccines for pets, which were introduced in the 1920s, have helped make the disease exceedingly rare in the developed world, this condition remains a serious problem in India and parts of Africa.

"It destroys the brain, it's a really, really bad disease," Muhlberger said. "We have a vaccine against rabies, and we have antibodies that work against rabies, so if someone gets bitten by a rabid animal we can treat this person," she said.
However, she said, "if you don't get treatment, there's a 100% possibility you will die."

3
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) first gained wide attention in the U.S. in 1993, when a healthy, young Navajo man and his fiancée living in the Four Corners area of the United States died within days of developing shortness of breath. A few months later, health authorities isolated hantavirus from a deer mouse living in the home of one of the infected people. More than 600 people in the U.S. have now contracted HPS, and 36% have died from the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The virus is not transmitted from one person to another, rather, people contract the disease from exposure to the droppings of infected mice.

Previously, a different hantavirus caused an outbreak in the early 1950s, during the Korean War, according to a 2010 paper in the journal Clinical Microbiology Reviews. More than 3,000 troops became infected, and about 12% of them died.

While the virus was new to Western medicine when it was discovered in the U.S., researchers realized later that Navajo medical traditions describe a similar illness, and linked the disease to mice.

4
Two vaccines are now available to protect children from rotavirus, the leading cause of severe diarrheal illness among babies and young children. The virus can spread rapidly, through what researchers call the fecal-oral route (meaning that small particles of feces end up being consumed).

Although children in the developed world rarely die from rotavirus infection, the disease is a killer in the developing world, where rehydration treatments are not widely available.

The WHO estimates that worldwide, 453,000 children younger than age 5 died from rotavirus infection in 2008. But countries that have introduced the vaccine have reported sharp declines in rotavirus hospitalizations and deaths.


5
The virus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, sparked an outbreak in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and another in South Korea in 2015. The MERS virus belongs to the same family of viruses as SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, and likely originated in bats, as well. The disease infected camels before passing into humans and triggers fever, coughing and shortness of breath in infected people.

MERS often progresses to severe pneumonia and has an estimated mortality rate between 30% and 40%, making it the most lethal of the known coronaviruses that jumped from animals to people. As with SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, MERS has no approved treatments or vaccine.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 29, 2020, 5:56 am

1
Do submariners have any expenses when on duty?
Officers in the US Navy pay for their meals. At sea they are billed for every meal prepared whether or not they eat.

In my day, your mess bill was about $6/ day.

The reason why stems from George Washington at Valley Forge promising Congress that his officers would not burden them, being men of means, if they’d only send money to feed and clothe the freezing soldiers. With the shift to officers from all aspects of society, the military instituted stipends to supplement officers pay but never changed the process. Some traditions have merit.

2
Mexico
The Caesar salad was invented here.
Julius Caesar did not invent the Caesar salad. And it wasn't Caesar Augustus, either, for that matter. No, it was the brainchild of Caesar Cardini, an Italian-American restaurateur and chef who dreamt up the dish at his Tijuana restaurant. Or so legend has it. The origin has been disputed, as Livio Santini, who worked in Caesar's restaurant, claimed to have brought the salad to the world from his mother's recipe. All that's for sure: That's a damn good salad.

3
An Eskimo kiss is when two people rub their noses together as a sign of affection. The Inuit are often thought to replace kissing with this nose-to-nose gesture because ordinary kissing could freeze their saliva and lock their lips together in an embarrassing, possibly dangerous fashion. However, there is far more to this simple action than many people think.
The Eskimo kiss is actually called “kunik”, and it has little to do with kissing or rubbing noses together. It’s a type of intimate greeting, often practiced between couples or children and their parents. The greeters may look like they rub noses, but they are actually sniffing each others’ hair and cheeks (there are scent glands in human cheeks). This way, two people who haven’t seen each other can quickly remind themselves about the other person and their signature scent.Although the kunik is not really relatable to kissing, it is generally considered an intimate gesture that is not often done in public.

4
The igloo is the quintessential dwelling of an Inuit: an ingenious dome-shapedconstruct built from blocks of ice and snow. A clever shelter crafted from the very thing that causes the need for shelter in the first place, the Igloo uses snow’s insulating properties to create a comfortable dwelling.
Although most people picture igloos as smallish snow domes, they come in a vast range of shapes and sizes . . . and also materials. For the Inuit, “igloo” is just a word for a building people live in. Any building, regardless of its size, shape, or building material. This means that you’re probably reading this article in an igloo

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by mech_401 » July 29, 2020, 9:58 pm

gold has very nearly hit an all time high. $1,960 oz
or 30,000 baht-weight . can't fault thais for keeping their gold . one of best performers this yr

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 30, 2020, 5:54 am

1 A MUST READ WITH CORONA HERE

Frederick Banting, Charles Best, and James Collip, the team that first discovered and refined insulin therapy, agreed to receive $1 each in exchange for giving their patent rights to the Board of Governors of the University of Toronto in 1923.
GREAT CANADIANS

2
The B52 Bomber
It’s Been 64 Years Since Its First (Maiden) Flight.
This Strategic Bomber, Despite Being Introduced In The 1950s, Is Still In Active Service And Shows No Sign Of Retiring — It’s Been Upgraded So It Can Serve Well Into The Next 10 Or 20 Years. It Was Built To Replace The Convair B-36 “Peacemaker” As The Strategic Air Command’s Primary Nuclear Weapons Delivery Vehicle.

3
It Can Carry Up To 70,000 Pounds Or 32,000 Kg Of Weapons.
A mixed ordnance of bombs, mines and missiles can be loaded into its internal bomb bay. It can even be of various configurations. Although a 20 mm (0.787 in) M61 Vulcan cannon was originally mounted on the H model, it has been removed since 1991.7. The cost-per-flight-hour is $72,000.

It’s significantly higher than the B-1B and lower than the B-2. The BUFF requires approximately 3,500 gallons of fuel per flight hour and for every sortie, it can use up to 20,000 gallons. In addition to the 70,000 pounds of payload, the B-52 can carry 312,000 lbs of fuel.

4
A10 Wahart hog
It has a bulletproof "bathtub" onboard
Well, kind of. There are over 1,200 pounds of .5-inch to 1.5-inch-thick titanium surrounding the pilot. It’s nicknamed the "bathtub," because when sh*t hits the fan and you're getting fired at, it's the safest spot to be.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » July 31, 2020, 5:55 am

1
WW2
One of history’s largest battles, The Battle of Kursk, between the Red Army & the Nazis started on 5 july in 1943. It involved 4 mln men, 70k field guns & mortars, 13k tanks & SPGs, 12k planes.


2
Odd Things Collected
Back scratchers
North Carolina dermatologist Manfred S. Rothstein owns 675 back scratchers from 71 different countries.

3
Regis Philbin TV personnality
Guinness World Records listed him as having put in more time on camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television - about 17,000 hours.

4
When many of us purchase a banana we hardly even notice that there is a sticker attached to the outer skin, but collector Becky Martz has been focused on creating the biggest banana label collection in the world and her most recent count was said to be around 19,631.

Labels have become a huge collectors object over the past few years, but banana stickers are something that is so easy to overlook. Becky has become famous because of her incredible banana label/sticker collection and has even started collecting broccoli bands now too.

5
Mensa is the largest and oldest high IQ society in the world. It is a non-profit organization open to people who score at the 98th percentile or higher on a standardised, supervised IQ or other approved intelligence test.[6][7] Mensa formally comprises national groups and the umbrella organisation Mensa International, with a registered office in Caythorpe, Lincolnshire, England, which is separate from the British Mensa office in Wolverhampton.[9] The word mensa (/ˈmɛnsə/, Latin: [ˈmẽːsa]) is Latin for 'table', as is symbolised in the organisation's logo, and was chosen to demonstrate the round-table nature of the organisation; the coming together of equals.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 1, 2020, 7:47 am

1
Stealing stinks
Police on the Big Island, Hawaii, are searching for two men who allegedly stole $1,000 worth of fruit from an agricultural centre in the town of Hilo this past February. The thieves showed up around 9:15 p.m. and made off with 18 infam­ously smelly durian fruit. According to Captain Kenneth Quiocho of the Hawaii Police Department, fruit bandits aren’t unheard of: they typically sell the stolen bounty to distributors or at farmers’ markets. Still, the durian swiping strikes him as odd. “There’s no underground market for durian here... although I hear it tastes good, if you can get past the smell.”

2
Work(out) from home
Restaurant server Elisha Nochomovitz of Balma, France, intended to compete in the Barcelona marathon on March 15, but COVID-19 disrupted his plans. He decided he would run anyway—42 kilometres back and forth on his 23-foot balcony. The journey took six hours and 48 minutes—significantly slower than his three-and-a-half-hour marathon best. Nevertheless, he shared the feat on social media and inspired house-bound runners around the world to take to their stairs, gardens or balconies to stay in top form.


3
The great maple syrup heist
The subject of one of the most audacious heists in Canadian history was a true Canadian staple: maple syrup. Between 2011 and 2012, nearly 3,000 tonnes of the sweet stuff—valued at $18 million—were stolen from a storage facility in Quebec. The mastermind, Richard Vallieres, was given an eight-year sentence and a $9.4 million fine in 2017, according to the Toronto Star; two other men were each given two-year jail terms. Thankfully, the stolen amount comprised barely one-tenth of Quebec’s maple syrup reserves.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 2, 2020, 1:42 pm

RUSSIA
1
Cats in Russia are allowed to go to the navy.

2
Lake Baikal is an ancient, massive lake in Siberia, the pride of Russia. It’s the deepest and cleanest lake on Earth! The lake’s length is 600 km (373 miles) and during the winter the thickness of the top of the ice can reach 2 meters (6.5 feet). Because the water is so clean, you can see through the ice.

3
The Russians either invented vodka or stole it from Poland and then lied about how they invented it, and when you're that intimately tied to a product you're kind of obligated to build a museum in its honor. Yes, in St. Petersburg there is a museum dedicated to Vladimir Putin. Also, there's a museum of vodka.

4
Chernobyl was once the most terrifying place on Earth; today it's a tourist trap and the subject of an HBO miniseries. But Chernobyl isn't the only place you can go in Russia if you want to experience the joys of nuclear contamination firsthand. There's also Lake Karachay, which is eerily beautiful but only because it's full of radioactive waste.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 3, 2020, 12:34 pm

1
Waffen-SS Soldiers Guarded the Nuremberg Trials
Unbelievable but true - an entire unit of former Waffen-SS Grenadiers were retrained and deployed by the Americans to help guard the Nuremberg Trials in 1946-49.


2
Antimatter
Like Superman's alter-ego, Bizzaro, the particles making up normal matter also have opposite versions of themselves. An electron has a negative charge, for example, but its antimatter equivalent, the positron, is positive. Matter and antimatter annihilate each other when they collide and their mass is converted into pure energy by Einstein's equation E=mc2. Some futuristic spacecraft designs incorporate anti-matter engines.

3
If you’re a big fan of baseball, Schrader’s Little Cooperstown exhibit in the St. Petersburg Museum of History is a must see.
Housing over 4,800 autographed balls, you can see signatures from all the greats like Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, and Joe DiMaggio, as well as balls signed by famous people like Elvis and historical figures like Fidel Castro.

4
Church made more convenient, the Daytona Beach Drive-In Christian Church welcomes visitors to simply sit in their parked car on the lawn while listening to a Sunday sermon. If you want to stop by to check it out for yourself, their services are at 8:30am and 10am on Sunday every week.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 6, 2020, 5:55 am

1
Has a surfacing submarine ever captured something on its deck?
Yes, in 2001, the USS Greenville sub was showboating, putting on a show for VIPs on board by conducting a ballast-blow surfacing maneuver (a dramatic extreme maneuver used in emergencies), which caused it to quickly shoot to the surface. They weren’t looking where they were going however, and what they caught on the deck was the Japanese research ship Ehime Maru, subsequently causing it to sink, and killing 9 people on board including four high-school students, two teachers, and three crew members.

2
Japanese Ration WW2
The normal ration was prepared during mealtimes by the field kitchen and typically served in tin boxes. It usually consisted of the following:
660 g (23.28 oz) of rice

209 g (7.37 oz) of barley

209 g (7.37 oz) of raw meat

600 g (21.16 oz) of fresh vegetables

60 g (2.11 oz) of pickled vegetables or preserve

Rice was (& still is) a staple of Japanese/Asian cuisine, thus it served as the mainstay of Imperial Japanese field rations. Barley was mixed with the rice to provide additional nutritional elements because rice (while rich in carbs) doesn’t really provide much of anything else nutritionally.

The raw meat usually consisted of anything that could be foraged because fresh meat shipments from Japan were sparse; seafood was naturally a popular option due to the island/coastal environments where the Imperial military operated. Wild game such as boar and even monkeys were also all on the menu if they could be caught.
Fresh vegetables were again a rare luxury from Japan, and if soldiers/sailors wanted any they mostly had to be foraged for.

Essentially, the only food stuffs that the military received regularly from the Home Islands were rice and preserved/pickled items because they had long shelf life’s. Transporting fresh items such as fruit, vegetables, meat, etc was costly and difficult due to how quickly they spoiled. Instead, units were encouraged to live off the land, thus freeing up logistics to transport other items such as ammunition & equipment.

3
Vietnam War
How, during the Vietnam War, did soldiers riding in open Hueys with all their weapons and equipment manage to hang on? And did any soldier ever fall off by accident?
Yep, my brother fell out of a Huey. He was in Nam and the radio went wild, with troops needing to be evacuated from a hot zone. He jumped in as the M-60 machine gunner. It was the first time he flew into a hot zone. His adrenaline was high. Because of that, he forgot to strap in. The Huey headed out over the paddies and couldn't land because there was a nest of Charlies that needed to be taken out first. The pilot banked to the left super hard so my brother could shoot the 60 down at Charlie's nest. The pilot banked too hard and my brother fell out right on top of two Charlies. The wind was knocked out of all three of them. My brother was the first to come to his senses, and realized he didn't have a weapon. He looked around and found one of the Charlie’s AK and as they started to get up he blasted them both. Killed them dead, he did. The chopper picked the GIs up and then came back and rescued my brother. When he got back to the base, the pilot said, “That is the bravest thing I have ever seen, jumping unarmed out of a Huey, kill two gooks, and saved a squad. Boy I am going to put you in for a Silver Star.” My brother told him, “I fell out and was just trying to save my ass.” He still got the Star. Analyse and improvise. A motto to live by!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 8, 2020, 2:52 pm

1
Hans-Ulrich Rudel
2 July 1916 – 18 December 1982 was a German ground-attack pilot during World War II. Rudel was the most decorated German serviceman of World War II, being the sole recipient of the Knight's Cross with Golden Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds in January 1945. Post-war, he was a prominent neo-Nazi activist in Latin America and West Germany.

During the war, Rudel was credited with the destruction of 519 tanks, as well as one battleship, one cruiser, 70 landing craft and 150 artillery emplacements.[3] He claimed 11 aerial victories (earning flying ace status) and the destruction of more than 800 vehicles of all types.[3] He flew 2,530 ground-attack missions exclusively on the Eastern Front, usually flying the Junkers Ju 87 "Stuka" dive bomber.[3]

Rudel surrendered to US forces on 8 May 1945 and emigrated to Argentina in 1948.[3] A committed and unrepentant National Socialist,[3] he founded the "Kameradenwerk", a relief organization for Nazi refugees that helped fugitives escape to Latin America and the Middle East. Together with Willem Sassen, Rudel helped shelter Josef Mengele, the notorious former SS doctor at Auschwitz. He worked as an arms dealer and a military advisor to the regimes of Juan Perón in Argentina, of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and of Alfredo Stroessner in Paraguay. Due to these activities, he was placed under observation by the US Central Intelligence Agency.


2
Did German soldiers disguise themselves as Allied soldiers? Were there any records or photos during World War 2 that prove them disguising themselves?
There is the Battle of the Bulge and the German operation “Greif”. Otto Skorzeny and 150 German soldiers tried to infiltrate the American lines dressed like American soldiers, and using jeeps and German tanks disguised as American armored vehicles. German soldiers who were captured in American uniforms were court-martialed , found guilty, and shot as spies by the American troops. There is footage of three of these soldiers and their executions, and shots of German Panther tanks and Sturmgeschutz assault guns modified with steel plates to make them look like american tanks, M10 in particular.

Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 10, 2020, 12:27 pm

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The slowest car in the world is the Renault Twizy. This is the slowest car in the world because it can only do up to 50mph. This car only has 3 doors.

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Slowest Animal
Banana Slug
Moving at a speed of only 0.000023 m/s, the banana slug is often regarded as the slowest animal in the world, outside of living organisms who do not move. Banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus) is a common name given to the three species of North American terrestrial slugs in the Ariolimax genus. Banana slugs are mostly yellow in color, and some have brown spots resembling a ripe banana, hence their name. Some banana slugs may also be tan, brown, white or greenish.

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. Sidhue River Bridge – China

At an incredible 460m (1509ft), it is the highest bridge in the world.

Suspended across the Sidhue River in the Badong County of the Hubei Province, in stretches more than 1,300m to connect Shanghai and Chendo. The bridge makes up part of a dangerous mountain path known as highway Huyu G50

Doodoo
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Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 11, 2020, 5:58 am

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12th August
Mother's Day Celebrations In Thailand. In Thailand, 12th August is celebrated as the birthday of Her Majesty an individual and the nation immerses in celebrations. As the Queen is also regarded as mother to all Thai people, this day is also celebrated as 'Mother's Day.'
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Known by the locals as “Aber,” Aberystwyth is an historic university town situated on the west coast of Wales. With 7,000 students attending school in Aberystwyth each year, it’s no surprise that the town is also a popular holiday destination for young people as evidenced by the city’s more than 50 pubs. The seafront features charming Victorian architecture with a wide promenade where visitors can sit and soak up the sun. Perched atop one of the surrounding hills are the remnants of a massive Iron Age fortress. The remains of the first Norman castle built in Wales can be found in Aberystwyth too.

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An ancient town with a rich history, Conwy is located in North Wales on the Conwy Estuary near the forests of Snowdonia. The dark-stoned fortress of Conwy Castle dominates the cityscape. Built in the 1280s by Edward I, the castle’s mammoth curtain walls and eight round towers remain intact and imposing. Views from the battlements offer visitors a bird’s eye view of the castle’s Great Hall and of the walls and towers that surround the medieval town. With its Byzantine processional cross and 15th-century screens, the church of St. Mary’s is worth a visit as well.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 2586
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » August 12, 2020, 6:54 am

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Greatest place to work for a Millenium
Cisco
Information Technology
WHAT EMPLOYEES ARE SAYING Cisco is a the greatest company on this planet. I've been with Cisco since college and it has provided a life that I wouldn't give up for anything. I believe in our leadership, and I believe in the direction that Cisco is going.

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Greatest City to live
Vienna
Overall rating: 99.1
Stability: 100
Healthcare: 100
Culture & Environment: 96.3
Education: 100
Infrastructure: 100

Maintaining its position in the number one spot for the second year in a row, Vienna provides the perfect blend of adventure, affordability, ease of living, and safety. The Austrian capital draws crowds with its Baroque architecture and Danube cruises, but it's just as exciting as a center of what’s new in the culinary and art worlds of Europe. And due to a city government that puts a lot of resources behind infrastructure and housing, the cost of living here is far lower than comparable European cities.

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slowest pitches in Baseball

Steve Johnson, Mariners (64.1 MPH Curveball)
R.A.
Steve Delabar, Reds (65.8 MPH Curveball)
Alex Claudio, Rangers (66.7 MPH Changeup)
John Lamb, Reds (66.7 MPH Curveball)
A.J.
Pat Neshek, Astros (67.4 MPH Changeup)
Jered Weaver, Angels (67.5 MPH Curveball)
Fernando Abad, Twins (70.8 MPH Changeup)
Anibal Sanchez, Tigers (71.4 MPH Changeup)

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