A little ray of sunshine from Australia

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by noosard » October 18, 2020, 9:26 am

You need to measure a bit better jack
Think you find tassie the wee state



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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by jackspratt » October 18, 2020, 9:34 am

Did you miss the " " noos?

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 18, 2020, 10:57 am

jackspratt wrote:Did you miss the " " noos?
Perhaps place it in the correct thread,

“ a little ray of sunshine out of New Zealand”


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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by jackspratt » October 18, 2020, 11:11 am

Good results, on whichever thread. 👍

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by tamada » October 18, 2020, 7:28 pm

Looks like God's Country is quietly slipping off the regional fence re- Chinese expansionism.

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal ... 56449.html

China responds.

https://eurasiantimes.com/china-ridicul ... e-beijing/

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Whistler » October 18, 2020, 8:31 pm

jackspratt wrote:
October 18, 2020, 9:15 am
Progressive governments returned in Australia's smallest "state", and the 9th state across the ditch.

In the latter case, with a huge swings to Labour and the Greens. =D>
When the constitution was framed for the Commonwealth of Australia. NZ (I think it was known as Maori Land) was to be part of Australia given a plebiscite, (that the NZ local regional pollies refused to run). They opted to become their own nation several years later.

I like the Kiwis. one day they should join the mainland. As it is the joke in Australia is how do you recognise a well balanced kiwi? 'One with a chip on each shoulder'.

Apologies to GT who seems like one of my nice Kiwi mates.
lies are already halfway around the world before the truth has laced up its shoes

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 19, 2020, 7:54 am

On this day, 19th October 1872, the largest single piece of reef gold ever discovered in the world is found at Hill End, in New South Wales.

Hill End, originally known as Bald Hill, is a gold-mining ghost town about 66km from Mudgee in the New South Wales central-west. Alluvial gold was discovered at Hill End in 1851 and within a month, there were 150 miners working the area. The Hill End goldfield was one of the richest gold mining areas in NSW and the first reef mining area in Australia. The Beyers and Holtermann nugget, the largest single piece of reef gold ever discovered in the world, was found by workers at the Star of Hope Gold Mining Co on Hawkins Hill, on 19 October 1872. It weighed about 286kg, measured 150cm by 66cm, and was worth at least £12,000 at the time.

Pictured: Stylised picture of B.O. Holtermann with the Holtermann Nugget, ca. 1874-1876 / photographer American & Australasian Photographic Company.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 22, 2020, 5:49 pm

“An old writing of Aussie’s and Australia”


AUSTRALIA AND AUSTRALIANS

The following has been written by the late Douglas Adams of "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" fame.

"Australia is a very confusing place, taking up a large amount of the bottom half of the planet. It is recognisable from orbit because of many unusual features, including what at first looks like an enormous bite taken out of its southern edge; a wall of sheer cliffs which plunge into the girting sea.

Geologists assure us that this is simply an accident of geomorphology, but they still call it the "Great Australian Bight", proving that not only are they covering up a more frightening theory but they can't spell either.

The first of the confusing things about Australia is the status of the place. Where other landmasses and sovereign lands are classified as continent, island or country, Australia is considered all three.

Typically, it is unique in this.

The second confusing thing about Australia is the animals. They can be divided into three categories: Poisonous, Odd, and Sheep. It is true that of the 10 most poisonous arachnids on the planet, Australia has 9 of them. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that of the 9 most poisonous arachnids, Australia has all of them.

Any visitors should be careful to check inside boots (before putting them on), under toilet seats (before sitting down) and generally everywhere else.

A stick is very useful for this task.

The last confusing thing about Australia is the inhabitants.

A short history: Sometime around 40,000 years ago some people arrived in boats from the north. They ate all the available food, and a lot of them died.

The ones who survived learned respect for the balance of nature, man's proper place in the scheme of things, and spiders. They settled in and spent a lot of the intervening time making up strange stories. They also discovered a stick that kept coming back.

Then, around 200 years ago, Europeans arrived in boats from the north.

More accurately, European convicts were sent, with a few deranged people in charge. They tried to plant their crops in autumn (failing to take account of the reversal of the seasons), ate all their food, and a lot of them died.

About then the sheep arrived, and have been treasured ever since. It is interesting to note here that the Europeans always consider themselves vastly superior to any other race they encounter, since they can lie, cheat, steal and litigate (marks of a civilised culture they say), whereas all the Aboriginals can do is happily survive being left in the middle of a vast red-hot desert - equipped with a stick.

Eventually, the new lot of people stopped being Europeans on 'extended holiday' and became Australians. The changes are subtle, but deep, caused by the mind-stretching expanses of nothingness and eerie quiet, where a person can sit perfectly still and look deep inside themselves to the core of their essence, their reasons for being, and the necessity of checking inside their boots every morning for fatal surprises. They also picked up the most finely tuned sense of irony in the world, and the Aboriginal gift for making up stories. Be warned.

There is also the matter of the beaches. Australian beaches are simply the nicest and best in the world, although anyone actually venturing into the sea will have to contend with sharks, stinging jellyfish, stonefish (a fish which sits on the bottom of the sea, pretends to be a rock and has venomous barbs sticking out of its back that will kill just from the pain) and surfboarders. However, watching
a beach sunset is worth the risk.

As a result of all this hardship, dirt, thirst and wombats, you would expect Australians to be a sour lot. Instead, they are genial, jolly, cheerful and always willing to share a kind word with a stranger. Faced with insurmountable odds and impossible problems, they smile disarmingly and look for a stick. Major engineering feats have been performed with sheets of corrugated iron, string and mud.

Alone of all the races on earth, they seem to be free from the 'Grass is greener on the other side of the fence' syndrome, and roundly proclaim that Australia is, in fact, the other side of that fence. They call the land "Oz" or "Godzone" (a verbal contraction of "God's Own Country"). The irritating thing about this is... they may be right.

TIPS TO SURVIVING AUSTRALIA

Don't ever put your hand down a hole for any reason - WHATSOEVER.

The beer is stronger than you think, regardless of how strong you think it is.

Always carry a stick.

Air-conditioning is imperative.

Do not attempt to use Australian slang unless you are a trained linguist and extremely good in a fist fight.

Wear thick socks.

Take good maps. Stopping to ask directions only works when there are people nearby.


If you leave the urban areas, carry several litres of water with you at all times, or you will die. And don't forget a stick.

Even in the most embellished stories told by Australians, there is always a core of truth that it is unwise to ignore.


HOW TO IDENTIFY AUSTRALIANS


They pronounce Melbourne as "Mel-bin".

They think it makes perfect sense to decorate highways with large fibreglass bananas, prawns and sheep.


They think "Woolloomooloo" is a perfectly reasonable name for a place, that "Wagga Wagga" can be abbreviated to "Wagga", but "Woy Woy" can't be called "Woy".

Their hamburgers will contain beetroot. Apparently it's a must-have.


How else do you get a stain on your shirt?

They don't think it's summer until the steering wheel is too hot to handle.

They believe that all train timetables are works of fiction.

And they all carry a stick


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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 25, 2020, 8:29 am

On this day, 25th October 1616, Dutch sea-captain Dirk Hartog becomes the first European to set foot on Australia's western coast and leaves his inscription at Cape Inscription, Western Australia.

Over 150 years before English explorer James Cook (then Lieutenant Cook) ever sighted eastern Australia, the Dutch landed in the far north and on the Western coast. In 1616, Dutch sea-captain Dirk Hartog sailed too far whilst trying out Henderik Brouwer's recently discovered route from the Cape of Good Hope to Batavia, via the Roaring Forties. Reaching the western coast of Australia, he landed on what is now known as Dirk Hartog Island, at Cape Inscription, on 25 October 1616. Here he left a pewter plate with an inscription recording his landing. The translation of the inscription reads: '1616. On 25th October there arrived here the ship Eendraght of Amsterdam. Supercargo Gilles Miebais of Liege; skipper Dirck Hatichs of Amsterdam. On 27th do. she set sail again for Bantam. Subcargo Jan Stins; upper steersman Pieter Doores of Bil. In the year 1616.'

In 1697, Dutch sailor Willem de Vlamingh reached "New Holland", as it was then called, and removed Hartog's pewter plate, replacing it with another plate. The original was returned to Holland where it still is kept in the Rijksmuseum. The original inscription was copied onto a new plate, and Vlamingh added new information which listed the sailors on his own voyage and read: 'Our fleet set sail from here to continue exploring the Southern Land, on the way to Batavia.'

Pictured: An illustration of Dirk Hartog nailing the inscribed pewter plate in Dirk Hartog Island, Australia. OnThisDay.
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Whistler » October 25, 2020, 2:29 pm

Barney wrote:
October 25, 2020, 8:29 am
On this day, 25th October 1616, Dutch sea-captain Dirk Hartog becomes the first European to set foot on Australia's western coast and leaves his inscription at Cape Inscription, Western Australia.

Over 150 years before English explorer James Cook (then Lieutenant Cook) ever sighted eastern Australia, the Dutch landed in the far north and on the Western coast. In 1616, Dutch sea-captain Dirk Hartog sailed too far whilst trying out Henderik Brouwer's recently discovered route from the Cape of Good Hope to Batavia, via the Roaring Forties. Reaching the western coast of Australia, he landed on what is now known as Dirk Hartog Island, at Cape Inscription, on 25 October 1616. Here he left a pewter plate with an inscription recording his landing. The translation of the inscription reads: '1616. On 25th October there arrived here the ship Eendraght of Amsterdam. Supercargo Gilles Miebais of Liege; skipper Dirck Hatichs of Amsterdam. On 27th do. she set sail again for Bantam. Subcargo Jan Stins; upper steersman Pieter Doores of Bil. In the year 1616.'

In 1697, Dutch sailor Willem de Vlamingh reached "New Holland", as it was then called, and removed Hartog's pewter plate, replacing it with another plate. The original was returned to Holland where it still is kept in the Rijksmuseum. The original inscription was copied onto a new plate, and Vlamingh added new information which listed the sailors on his own voyage and read: 'Our fleet set sail from here to continue exploring the Southern Land, on the way to Batavia.'

Pictured: An illustration of Dirk Hartog nailing the inscribed pewter plate in Dirk Hartog Island, Australia. OnThisDay.
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Nice one Barney, these posts are great.

There are also some thoughts that sailors from other countries may have landed, Arabs heading to Java getting caught in unfavourable winds and even Chinese traders. Those that landed on the barren NW coast did not see any value for the continent. Ironically this area is now one of the richest parts of Australia with some of the world's largest reserves of iron ore and natural gas. Had they known this, Australians would have a different native language than English (with due respect to all First Australians). We could have been speaking Arabic, Dutch, Chinese or even French if La Perouse had arrived a few weeks earlier at Botany Bay.
lies are already halfway around the world before the truth has laced up its shoes

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 27, 2020, 9:03 am

That’s correct whistler about the inhospitable land in our west coast.
I have scuba dived 3 times around the Abrolholis Islands about 40km west of Geraldton and there is a sad history with the Dutch landing there.


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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 27, 2020, 9:07 am

Wow Australia was barely 60 years old as a settlement and we were already taking in refugees. I suppose we have always and still are a nice mob of people.

On this day, 27th October 1841, one of the last ships with religious refugees from Germany arrives in South Australia.

In the 1800s, under individual Friedrich Wilhelm III, German/Prussian Lutherans suffered religious persecution. Friedrich Wilhelm was an autocratic individual who believed he had the right to create his own state church from the two main Protestant churches - the Lutheran church and the smaller Reformed church - in a united Prussian state church. This would effectively remove the right of Lutherans to worship in a way of their choosing. Penalties for non-adherance to the state religion were severe. Many Lutherans immigrated to Australia to escape the persecution.

Thanks to wealthy Scottish businessman and chairman of the South Australian Company, George Fife Angas, a deal was struck by Pastor August Kavel to start a new Lutheran settlement in South Australia. The first group of 21 Lutherans arrived on the ship 'Bengalee' on 18 November 1838, followed two days later by the main group on the 'Prince George'. They first settled at the town of Klemzig. Many more ships followed over the next three years.

One of the last ships to arrive in South Australia with religious refugees was the Skjold on 27 October 1841. Captain Hans Christian Claussen commanded the Skjold which brought over two hundred Lutheran immigrants. Several of these Lutheran migrants were among the first to start the South Australian settlements of Lobethal and Bethany. Lobethal was started by about thirty families who, between them, acquired about two hundred acres, and paved the way for the German settlement of the region.

Pictured: Skjold. David H. Hunter website.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Laan Yaa Mo » October 27, 2020, 9:11 am

Scotsmen are really nice people, and keen builders of Empire.
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » October 28, 2020, 11:25 am

Laan Yaa Mo wrote:
October 27, 2020, 9:11 am
Scotsmen are really nice people, and keen builders of Empire.
I could name one that wasn't that nice, "Mel Gibson".

In his historical documentary on Scotland, he killed a lot of people :D :D :D

Mel Gibson.jpg
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 29, 2020, 12:03 pm

On this day, 28th October 1916, Australia's first referendum on conscription fails.

William Morris 'Billy' Hughes was Australia's seventh Prime Minister. Born in London on 25 September 1862, he migrated to Australia in 1884. After many years of wandering from job to job, he established a mixed business which sold, among other things, political pamphlets. As a result, his shop came popular with young reformers, and listening to their discussions piqued Hughes's interest in politics. In 1894, he won preselection for the seat of Lang, allowing his debut into state parliament.

Although initially opposed to Federation, Hughes saw the advantages Federation offered for his particular areas of interest, those being defence, immigration and industrial relations. He won the federal seat of West Sydney in 1901, and held it until 1916, being an eloquent speaker and shrewd tactician. During the opening years of World War I, Hughes, as attorney-general, was active in his ministry. When Prime minister Andrew Fisher resigned due to ill health in 1915, Hughes was chosen to succeed him.

One of the most controversial of Hughes's policies was conscription, an issue which not only created a rift in the Labor Party, but divided the young nation as well. On 28 October 1916, the first referendum to introduce compulsory military enlistment was voted on, and narrowly defeated.

Two weeks later, on 13 November, the Labor Party expelled Hughes over his support for conscription. However, just a few days earlier Hughes had formed the Nationalist Party which incorporated both expelled Labor Party members and members of the opposition. Hughes formed a new cabinet and remained as Prime Minister, a position he retained until 1923.

Pictured: Men of the 10th Light Horse Regiment at Hod Willegha, Sinai, October 1916. The majority of soldiers voted Yes in both referendums. They saw it as a way to make others “do their bit”, to help fill the holes left by casualties, or provide them with the opportunity of a break. Australian War Memorial J02466
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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by Barney » October 29, 2020, 12:19 pm

How was Vegemite discovered?

Vegemite was invented in Melbourne in 1922 when Australian food manufacturer Fred Walker asked chemist CP Callister to create a product similar to British Marmite. ... As overseas travel increased, Vegemite was carried around the world by Australians as a way to reaffirm their connection to home.

Where does Vegemite sandwich come from?

Vegemite (/ˈvɛdʒɪmaɪt/ VEJ-i-myte) is a thick, dark brown Australian food spread made from leftover brewers' yeast extract with various vegetable and spice additives. It was developed by Cyril Callister in Melbourne, Victoria in 1922.

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by tamada » October 29, 2020, 12:47 pm

Barney wrote:
October 29, 2020, 12:19 pm
How was Vegemite discovered?

Vegemite was invented in Melbourne in 1922 when Australian food manufacturer Fred Walker asked chemist CP Callister to create a product similar to British Marmite. ... As overseas travel increased, Vegemite was carried around the world by Australians as a way to reaffirm their connection to home.

Where does Vegemite sandwich come from?

Vegemite (/ˈvɛdʒɪmaɪt/ VEJ-i-myte) is a thick, dark brown Australian food spread made from leftover brewers' yeast extract with various vegetable and spice additives. It was developed by Cyril Callister in Melbourne, Victoria in 1922.

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That's an excellent potted history there Barney, thanks. I was introduced to it on my first expedition to Moombah in 1980. Being Jockinese, I wasn't familiar with Marmite at all so couldn't compare but for me, it became a case of 'only if there's absolutely nothing else to eat.'

So basically Fred Walker asked C P Callister to make something that tasted like British dogsh*t that wasn't dogsh*t.

Vegemite... the Durian of the Downundah

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » October 29, 2020, 1:01 pm

Vegemite is one of the richest sources of B vitamins specifically thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and folate (B1, B2, B3 and B9, respectively). B vitamins have a direct impact on your energy levels, brain function, and cell metabolism. Vitamin B complex helps prevent infections and helps support or promote: cell health. growth of red blood cells.

I still eat it these days. Vegemite and Cheese on Ryvita with my sweet Spring Gully Gherkins

Ryvita.png
Coon Cheese.jpg
Sprig Gully Gherkins.jpg

Some say that it is an acquired taste. \:D/ =D> Others prefer Marmite. Each to his own. :guitar: :guitar:

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by noosard » October 29, 2020, 2:24 pm

vegemite.jpg
vegemite.jpg (11.33 KiB) Viewed 89 times
All of them good
Vegemite my favourite one

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Re: A little ray of sunshine from Australia

Post by pipoz4444 » October 29, 2020, 2:27 pm

noosard wrote:
October 29, 2020, 2:24 pm
vegemite.jpg

All of them good
Vegemite my favourite one
Have never tried Promite?

I think it is also to do with what you try or are fed, when you are a child. If you are conditioned to like some foods when you are young, then they seem to stay with you for life. :-k

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