Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 20, 2019, 4:34 pm

For today

1) Toronto Maple Leaf Gardens a construction miracle
Construction began at midnight on June 1, 1931. In what is to this day considered to be a remarkable accomplishment, the Gardens was constructed in five months and two weeks at a cost of C$1.5 million

2) Tallest
Building Burj Khalifa United Arab Emirates Dubai 829.8 meters 2,722 feet 2010 built
Flagpole Jeddah Flagpole Saudi Arabia Jeddah 171 meters 561 feet 2014 built


3) Franklin D. Roosevelt
Longest presidency:
4,422 days
1933–1945
William Henry Harrison
Shortest presidency:
31 days
1841

4) Shortest commercial flight
The world’s shortest commercial flight takes place between the two Orkney Islands, Westray and Papa Westray, just north of Scotland, separated by a distance of only 1.7 miles. Operated by Loganair, the flight duration is officially two minutes, but under ideal wind condition can be completed in only 47 seconds

5) Longest Flights with stop(s)
Air New Zealand NZ 1 London—Heathrow Auckland Los Angeles 18,354 km (11,405 mi; 9,910 nmi) 19,248 km (11,960 mi; 10,393 nmi) 26:25hr 777-300ER
Longest Flight Direct
Newark Singapore Singapore Airlines SQ 21 15,344 km (9,534 mi; 8,285 nmi) 18:30–18:45 A350-900ULR Oct 11, 2018



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 21, 2019, 8:12 am

1) The fewest number of cars to finish a NASCAR race is seven. Only seven drivers out of 32 finished the 1966 Southeastern 500. Dick Hutcherson, who drove the No. 29 car, won the race.

2) NASCAR teams may use between nine and 14 sets of tires in a race, which comes to between 36 and 56 total tires. Multiply those figures by 43 cars that can potentially finish, and 1,548 to 2,408 tires can be used in a single race, as of September 2014.
The number of sets allowed per each team varies based upon the type of track and the length of the race. Each tire costs $449 each, and teams spend an average of $20,000 on tires for a single race. Tires lasts about 100 miles on a NASCAR track. They are 11.5 inches wide with a weight of 24 pounds each. Goodyear manufactures 18 different tires for NASCAR teams over an entire season.


3) With over 75 million fans, NASCAR is the leading spectator sport in the United States. In fact, 17 out of the top 25 spectator sports are NASCAR events.

In the United States, nearly one out of every three adults is a NASCAR fan. The largest NASCAR arena holds 190,000 spectators while the largest NFL stadiums feature a maximum occupancy of 60,000 to 80,000. In terms of television viewers, NASCAR falls just behind the NFL as the most-watched televised sporting event. With an estimated $3 billion per year in sponsorships, two times more than the NFL, NASCAR is also the most financially lucrative spectator sport in the United States.

4) As of April 17, 2014, Bill Elliott tops the list of fastest qualifying track records in NASCAR history, having driven 212.809 mph at Talladega in 1987. In that same year, he drove 210.364 mph at Daytona, earning NASCAR's second-fastest time.

5) According to the official webpage for the IndyCar Series, IndyCars can reach speeds up to 235 mph, and the top speed in NASCAR is 212 mph. IndyCar utilizes open-wheel racers, while NASCAR vehicles are modeled after cars like the Toyota Camry and Ford Fusion.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by saint » September 21, 2019, 11:52 am

6) Nascar is the most boring motor sport there is , and all those people only watch in the hope of seeing a spectacular crash.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by GT93 » September 22, 2019, 7:25 am

That's over the top. I'm not into motorsports but saying all followers of one form just want to see crashes is mean. Car crashes can be horrific.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by saint » September 22, 2019, 9:10 am

You think . Motor sport today is one of the safest forms of sport there is . With millions being invested in safety for not only the participants , but also the paying public .
But like you said you know little on the subject , but still felt the need to comment .
Something you do know a lot about .

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by mech_401 » September 23, 2019, 9:38 am

nascar changed thats what happened. in 50s and 60s it was a cheap way to take a stock sedan and
with minimal modifications go racing.

now everythings multi-millions, the ave guy cant even dream about it. and interest in sport fading

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 23, 2019, 11:08 am

1) The Golden Gate Bridge is famous because it was the world's longest suspension bridge when it was first constructed in 1937 until November 21, 1964, when New York City opened its Verrazano–Narrows Bridge. The Verrazano–Narrows Bridge lost its place as the world's longest suspension bridge when the Humber Bridge opened in England on July 17, 1981.The Golden Gate Bridge took slightly more than 4 years to build. Construction started on the bridge on January 5, 1933, and did not open for vehicular traffic until May 28, 1937. The bridge's name is derived from the Golden Gate Strait, which is the entrance to the San Francisco Bay area from the Pacific Ocean. Eleven men died during the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. Ten of these men died when a section of scaffolding that was carrying 12 men fell through a safety net. During construction, there was a net that was implemented below the bridge to catch anyone who fell. The 19 men who were saved by the net were often referred to as the Halfway-to-Hell Club.

2) John Jacob Rascob built the Empire State Building because he was competing with other entrepreneurs to construct the tallest skyscraper in the world. His main competitor was Walter Chrysler, who was attempting to build the world's tallest building in New York City at the same time.

The French completion of the Eiffel Tower in 1889, at 984 feet, spurred American architects to outdo each other to construct the world's tallest skyscraper. In 1909, the Metropolitan Life Tower reached 700 feet and 50 stories. In 1913, the Woolworth building reached 792 feet and 57 stories. After the Bank of Manhattan building reached 927 feet and 71 stories in 1929, Walter Chrysler and John Jacob Rascob joined the fray. Each kept the details of the height of his building from the other. In the end, the Chrysler Building topped off at 1,046 feet, while the Empire State Building, at 1,250 feet and 102 stories, became the world's tallest skyscraper, a record it held until 1972, when the World Trade Center was completed. In 2009, when the Burj Khalifa building in Dubai was finished, it became the world's tallest building at 2,722 feet.

To build the Empire State Building, Rascob first bought the old Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and demolished that building to use the site. In the race to be first and tallest, the Empire State Building was constructed in only one year and 45 days, and its cost was almost $10 million less than its $50 million budget. On the opening day, May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover symbolically lit up the Empire State Building from the White House by pushing a button.

3) The main Great Wall of China stretches approximately 5,500 miles along the southern edge of Inner Mongolia. Explorer experts state that it takes 18 months to walk its entire length. It was constructed during the Ming dynasty in the 14th and 15th century, and is sometimes called the Ming Wall.

4) While it is impossible to know exactly what the Great Wall of China cost to build, modern calculations estimate the cost to be approximately $360 billion. The wall is 4,160 miles from end to end.

5) The Great Wall of China is famous because it is an architectural feat of ancient China that is also the longest man-made wall in the world. The main purpose for building this structure was as a defensive fortification against invaders.

The construction of the Great Wall of China began in the third century B.C. Soldiers, commoners and convicts worked on this building project. It is believed that approximately 400,000 people died during its construction. This construction project was completed in the 16th century. In the 17th century, the Manchus were able to break through this fortification.

In 1987, the Great Wall of China was designated as a World Heritage site by UNESCO. Although its official length was given as 5,500 miles in the past, a recent archaeological survey estimates that the entire length of the Great Wall was 13,170 miles during the 2,000 years of its construction.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 24, 2019, 7:50 pm

1) Approximate 80,000 components come together to make an F1 car. The cars have to be assembled with cent per cent accuracy. If it were assembled 99.9% correctly, it would go on the track with 80 components wrongly placed.

2) F1 car engines complete their life in about two hours of racing. Just compare this with normal engines which go on serving us faithfully for decent 20 years.

3) An F1 engine usually revs up to 18000 rpm. This means that the piston travels up and down 300 times a second. Road car engines rev up to 6000 rpm at max.

4) The cars have more than a kilometer of cable linked to about 100 sensors and actuators which monitor and control the car.

5) An F1 car can accelerate from 0 to 160 kph and decelerate back to 0 in just four seconds.

6) An F1 car weighs around 550 kg.(1210 lbs) an average car weighs 2871 lbs or 1305 kgs

7) Most racing cars have their tyres filled with nitrogen. The reason being nitrogen has a more consistent pressure compared to normal air.

8) Road car tyres can last 60 000 to 100 000 km. On the other hand, racing tyres are designed to last only 90 to 120 km.
The tyres lose weight during the race. In a GP each tyre loses about 0.5kg in weight due to wear.

9) The cars can be refueled at 12 liters per second. The rig used would take just 4 seconds to fill the tank of an average road car.Pit stop crews take only 3 seconds to refuel and change tyres.

10)

10) Shortest race in F1 was in Adelaide Australia in 1991 After 24 minutes the race was stopped due to weather conditions Ayrton Senna said it was not a race it was just a matter of staying on the circuit

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 25, 2019, 6:23 am

More Iceland quite a different place

1) Mosquitoes do not exist in Iceland.

2) Raw Puffin heart is delicacy

3) The Icelandic police don’t carry guns. Crime in Iceland is very low and violent crime is practically nonexistent.

4) The country’s national sport is handball.

5) Iceland is home to one of the world’s oldest democracies; established in 930.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 26, 2019, 5:45 am

GREAT DEPRESSION

1) People who lost their homes often lived in what were called “Hoovervilles,” or shanty towns, that were named after President Herbert Hoover. There was also “Hoover Stew” (food dished out in soup kitchens), “Hoover Blankets” (newspapers that served as blankets), “Hoover Hogs” (jack rabbits used as food), and “Hoover Wagons” (broken cars that were pulled by mules).

2) Chicago gangster Al Capone (1899-1947), in one of his sporadic attempts at public relations, opened a soup kitchen during the Great Depression. For millions, soup kitchens provided the only food they would see all day.

3) The Wall Street Crash of 1929 was one of the main causes of the Great Depression. “Black Thursday,” “Black Monday,” and “Black Tuesday” are all correct terms to describe the Crash because the initial crash occurred over several days, with Tuesday being the most devastating.

4) On “Black Tuesday,” October 29, 1929, the market lost $14 billion, making the loss for that week an astounding $30 billion. This was ten times more than the annual federal budget and far more than the U.S. had spent in WWI. Thirty billion dollars would be equivalent to $377,587,032,770.41 today.

5) One American sheep farmer found that he would not make money off of his sheep during the depression. Rather than watch his 3,000 sheep starve to death, he cut their throats and threw them in a canyon.

6) During the worst years of the Depression (1933-1934) the overall jobless rate was 25% (1 out of 4 people) with another 25% taking wage cuts or working part time. The gross national product fell by almost 50%. It was not until 1941, when WWII was underway, that unemployment officially fell back below 10%.

7) During the Great Depression, a record 60-80 million Americans went to the movies every week. One of the biggest blockbusters was Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 individual Kong. Other popular movies included The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Gone with the Wind (1939). Note Population of USA in 1933 was 123,000,000

8) Between 1930 and 1935, nearly 750,000 farms were lost through bankruptcy or sheriff sales.

9) The Hawley-Smoot Tariff Act of 1930 increased U.S. tariffs which, in turn, decreased international trade (especially in the farming sector) and helped spread the Great Depression worldwide. As it spread, it became partly responsible for Nazism in Germany and for WWII (1939-1945).

10) When the Depression struck, Mexican-Americans were accused of taking jobs away from “real” Americans and of unfairly burdening local relief efforts. Some were “encouraged” to return to Mexico

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 27, 2019, 7:00 am

1) First country to use paper money, China

2) From which US city can one travel south to enter Canada , Detroit

3) Frederic Baur who invented the Pringles can passed away in 2008 and his ashes are buried in one

4) In the 1980s Pablo Escobar's Cartel spent $2500 a month on rubber bands to secure his cash

5) Ben & Jerry ( Ice Cream ) learned how to make ice cream by taking a $5 correspondence course offered by Penn State University Their advertising budget was Zero, "Who can taste something in a magazine?" They would give away free samples

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Stantheman » September 27, 2019, 7:30 am

Just to add a gee wiz note to number 2, The only way to reach Point Roberts Washington by land is through Canada.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 28, 2019, 10:00 am

GOLF
1) In the 1949 British Open, Harry Bradshaw drove a ball into a beer bottle, breaking off the neck and shoulder. Deciding to play it where it lay rather than risk taking a penalty, he smashed the bottle with his club and sent the ball about 30 ft.

2) Henry George "Dads" Miller of Anaheim, Calif., shot a 99 on a 5,734-yd. municipal course. Miller was 100 years old at the time; he broke his age by one stroke. Dads, who did not play golf seriously until he was 67, shot an 82 at the age of 95.

3) On the 13th hole at the 1938 PGA tournament, Jimmy Hines's chip shot hit opponent Sam Snead's ball, sending both into the cup. A birdie two was awarded to both players, who were tied at that point. Snead wound up beating Hines by one stroke.

4) La Jenny Naturist Course, on France’s west coastline, is the only golf course in the world where nudity is not only allowed but a must.

5) In 1764, the standard 18-hole golf course was created at St Andrews when members did what?
A: Modified the course from 22 to 18 holes.

6) How did two Scotsmen from Dunfermline, John Reid and Robert Lockhart, first demonstrate golf in the USA?
A: By setting up a hole in an orchard in 1888.

7) Where was the first 18-hole golf course in the United States?
A: On a sheep farm in Downers Grove, Illinois, in 1892.

8) Traditionally, golfers used what to elevate the ball?
A: Mounds of sand.

9) Who is the first successful Zimbabwean golfer? Nick Price

10) Which 4 countries participated in Olympics golf 1900?France, Great Britain, Greece, and the United States

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 29, 2019, 8:43 am

1) During a 2004 episode of Sesame Street, Cookie Monster said that before he started eating cookies, his name was Sid.

2) According to the National Retail Federation, Americans spend $310 million on pet costumes last Halloween.

3) Herbert Hoover was Stanford's football team manager. At the first Stanford-Cal game in 1892, he forgot to bring the ball.

4) Horses can't vomit.

5) For $45, the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing will sell you a 5-lb bag with $10,000 worth of shredded U.S. currency.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 30, 2019, 9:22 am

1) In 1999, Furbies were banned from the National Security Agency's Maryland headquarters because it was feared the toys might repeat national security secrets.

2) Bear Bryant was once asked to contribute $10 to help pay for a sportswriter's funeral. According to legend, he said, "Here's a twenty, bury two."

3) Only female mosquitoes will bite you.

4) When asked why he chose the name Piggly Wiggly, founder Clarence Saunders said, "So people will ask that very question."

5) Norwegian skier Odd-Bjoern Hjelmeset on why he didn't win gold at the 2010 Olympics: "I think I have seen too much porn in the last 14 days."

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 1, 2019, 10:56 am

1) 1968 Boeing rolls out its first 747

2) 1955 James Dean dies in car crash

3) 1927 Babe Ruth hits 60 homeruns in a season

4) 1947 New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers world series game is televised for first time

5) 1996 People who are convicted of Domestic Violence even at a misdemeanor level are restricted from owning firearms

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 1, 2019, 7:31 pm

1) The average adult spends more time on the toilet than they do exercising.

2) Apple seeds contain cyanide.

3) A Greek-Canadian man invented the “Hawaiian” pizza.

4) A cubic inch of human bone can bear the weight of five standard pickup trucks.

5) The average American spends about 2.5 days a year looking for lost items.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 2, 2019, 8:03 pm

1) More Monopoly money is printed each year than real U.S. currency.
The U.S. government prints $974 million annually in order to replace old money. But, according to USA Today, Parker Brothers, the company behind Monopoly, prints $30 billion in fake currency each year.

2) The average American produces 4.5 pounds of trash per day.
The United States Environmental Protection Agency informs us that, in 2015, Americans produced an average of 4.48 pounds of trash per person per day. Paper and cardboard products were the biggest culprits, while yard trimmings, plastic products, and consumer electronics also made up the bulk of trash.

While that may seem like a lot of trash, it was actually one of the lowest estimates since 1990. So we’re certainly improving when it comes to taking care of the Earth!

3) It’s possible to turn peanut butter into diamonds.
While most of us are happy to slap some peanut butter between two slices of bread, scientist Dan Frost of the Bayerisches Geoinstitut in Germany did something a little bit different with his peanut butter: He made a diamond. Frost studies the conditions of Earth’s mantle and has found ways to mimic them in his lab. According to Frost, the high pressures of the mantle can strip oxygen from carbon dioxide and leave behind the carbon to form a diamond. And since peanut butter is already rich in carbon, the scientist was able to transform the nutty goodness into a shiny jewel.

4) One man set a world record by putting on 260 T-shirts.
When Ted Hastings’ son asked him whether he could set an official Guinness World Record, the father decided to give it a try. And on February 17, 2019, he reached his goal by wearing 260 T-shirts at one time. Ted was able to get 20 shirts on by himself. After that, he required assistance from a team to help him into sizes ranging from medium to 20X. Around the 150-shirt mark, there were concerns about Ted’s ability to breathe due to the weight of the fabric, but he was determined to keep going and beat the previous record of 257 shirts.

5) The thing used to measure your feet at the shoe store is called a Brannock Device.
Whenever you got a new pair of shoes as a kid, your parents likely had you sit down in the store while the shoe salesperson measured your foot with a weird-looking metal device. You probably never gave that handy-dandy feet-measuring contraption a second thought. But if you were curious, it happens to be called a Brannock Device, and it was invented by Charles Brannock and patented in 1926. The devices are still sold by the Brannock Device Company, which operates in Liverpool, New York.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 4, 2019, 11:34 am

1) Sloths can hold their breath for longer than dolphins.
If you’re ever lucky enough to see a sloth, it will likely be lounging around in a tree or slowly making its way from one branch to another. Or, it could be in the water. That’s because the animal’s arms, which are both long and strong, make them great swimmers. And you don’t have to worry about their slow-moving ways being a danger: Sloths can hold their breath for up to 40 minutes, which is 30 minutes longer than a dolphin.

2) The largest scrambled eggs ever made weighed more than two tons.
You know what they say: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And if you’re the kind of person who wakes up hungry, then perhaps your mouth will water over the fact that in October 2018, more than 20 chefs in Bagatelle, Mauritius, worked together for more than two hours to cook the largest scrambled eggs ever.
After months of preparation that involved more than 250 people, the eggs wound up weighing 5,436 pounds and 9.58 ounces. The recipe included some 947 pounds of butter, 246 liters of milk, 22 pounds of salt, and more than four pounds of pepper.

3) Yawning Cools Your Brain

4) On July 4, 2002, marathon swimmer Martin Steel began a journey in northern Minnesota that saw him making his way down the 2,348-mile Mississippi River in an effort to become the first person to swim its entire length. On September 9, he reached his goal, ending up in the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana after an incredible 68-day journey. That’s about 34.5 miles a day!

5) If you plug your nose, you can’t tell the difference between an apple, a potato, and an onion.
If you’ve ever been told to pinch your nose while taking medicine so that you don’t have to suffer through the awful taste, you might want to follow that advice. Our sense of smell is responsible for interpreting around 80 percent of what we taste. That means that without being able to smell apples, potatoes, and onions, they’re indistinguishable. If you want to watch a few people try, check out this video. Or just trust us—it works!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 7, 2019, 8:40 am

1) Unusual Sport
Wife carrying is a sport in which male competitors race while each carrying a female teammate. It is held annually in Finland in early July, and requires a man to negotiate a 253.5 m course while carrying their wife on their back. The course includes various surfaces and getting through dry land and water based obstacles.
The prize to the winner is a mobile phone, and more importantly they also win their wife’s weight in beer.

2) Former Bull Scottie Pippen blew through $120 million.
One of those decisions was purchasing a $4 million jet that didn't even work. He had to pay another $1 million to repair it.

3) ONLY Two days out of 365 days of the year feature no professional sports games (MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL). The day before and the day after the MLB All-Star Break.

4) Pittsburgh is the only city where all the major sports teams (MLB,NHL,NFL) have the same colors: Black and gold.

5) Kite flying is a professional sport in Thailand.

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