Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 8, 2020, 6:04 am

1 Amon Leopold Göth (pronounced [ˈɡøːt]; alternative spelling Goeth; 11 December 1908 – 13 September 1946; About this soundaudio (help·info)) was an Austrian SS functionary and war criminal. He served as the commandant of the Kraków-Płaszów concentration camp in Płaszów in German-occupied Poland for most of the camp's existence during World War II.

Göth was tried after the war by the Supreme National Tribunal of Poland at Kraków and was found guilty of personally ordering the imprisonment, torture, and extermination of individuals and groups of people. He was also convicted of homicide, the first such conviction at a war crimes trial, for "personally killing, maiming and torturing a substantial, albeit unidentified number of people."h was executed by hanging not far from the former site of the Płaszów camp. The 1993 film Schindler's List, in which Göth is portrayed by Ralph Fiennes, depicts his running of the Płaszów concentration camp.



2 Phoolan Devi (10 August 1963 – 26 July 2001), popularly known as "Bandit Queen", was an Indian bandit and later a member of parliament.
Bandit, to a murderer to a Poitician
Who said it couldnt be done

3 Anna Rose "Rosie" Napravnik (born February 9, 1988) is a former American Thoroughbred horse racing jockey and two-time winner of the Kentucky Oaks. Beginning her career in 2005, she was regularly ranked among the top jockeys in North America in both earnings and total races won. By 2014 she had been in the top 10 by earnings three years in a row and was the highest-ranked woman jockey in North America. In 2011, she won the Louisiana Derby for her first time and was ninth in the 2011 Kentucky Derby with the horse Pants on Fire. In 2012 she became the first woman rider to win the Kentucky Oaks, riding Believe You Can and then winning the race for a second time in 2014 on Untapable. She is only the second woman jockey to win a Breeders' Cup race and the first to win more than one, having won the 2012 Breeders' Cup Juvenile on Shanghai Bobby and the 2014 Breeders' Cup Distaff on Untapable. Napravnik's fifth-place finish in the 2013 Kentucky Derby and third in the 2013 Preakness Stakes on Mylute are the best finishes for a woman jockey in those two Triple Crown races to date, and she is the only woman to have ridden in all three Triple Crown races.



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 9, 2020, 7:14 am

1
NORMANDY WAS CHOSEN AS THE D-DAY LANDING SITE BECAUSE THE ALLIES WERE HOPING TO SURPRISE GERMAN FORCES.
Since the Germans would presumably expect an attack on the Pas de Calais—the closest point to the UK—the Allies decided to hit the beaches of Normandy instead. Normandy was also within flying distance of war planes stationed in England, and it had a conveniently located port.

2
PULLING OFF THE D-DAY LANDINGS INVOLVED SOME ELABORATE TRICKERY TO FOOL THE NAZIS.
If the Allies landed in France, Hitler was confident that his men could repel them. “They will get the thrashing of their lives,” the Führer boasted. But in order to do that, the German military would need to know exactly where the Allied troops planned to begin their invasion. So in 1943, the Allies kicked off an ingenious misinformation campaign. Using everything from phony radio transmissions to inflatable tanks, they successfully convinced the Germans that the British and American forces planned to make landfall at the Pas de Calais. Duped by the charade, the Germans kept a large percentage of their troops stationed there (and in Norway, which was the rumored target of another bogus attack). That left Normandy relatively under-defended when D-Day came along.

3
"D-DAY" WAS A COMMON MILITARY TERM, ACCORDING TO EISENHOWER'S PERSONAL AIDE.
A few years after Eisenhower retired from public life, he was asked if the “D” in “D-day” stood for anything. In response to this inquiry, his aide Robert Schultz (a brigadier general) said that “any amphibious operation has a ‘departed date’; therefore the shortened term ‘D-Day’ is used”

4
D-DAY WAS AMONG THE LARGEST AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULTS IN MILITARY HISTORY.

On D-Day, approximately 156,115 Allied troops—representing the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Greece, New Zealand, Norway, and Poland—landed on the beaches of Normandy. They were accompanied by almost 7000 nautical vessels. In terms of aerial support, the Allies showed up with more than 10,000 individual aircrafts, which outnumbered the German planes 30 to one.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 11, 2020, 6:46 am

1 Beachmaster Colin Maud's Shillelagh D-Day
Commodore Colin Douglas Maud DSO & Bar, DSC & Bar (21 January 1903 – 22 April 1980) was a Royal Navy officer who during the Second World War commanded the destroyers Somali and Icarus and acted as beach master of Juno beach at the D-day landings. With a heavy black beard, he "possessed the outward appearance of a latter-day buccaneer and was endowed with exceptional boldness and tenacity to go with it". His blackthorn stick and dog Winnie provided an image when portrayed by Kenneth More in the film The Longest Day. He was described as "one of the most popular officers in the British Navy".[2]

2
A pogrom is a violent riot aimed at the massacre or persecution of an ethnic or religious group, particularly one aimed at Jews. The Slavic-languages term originally entered the English language in order to describe 19th- and 20th-century attacks on Jews in the Russian Empire (mostly within the Pale of Settlement). Similar attacks against Jews at other times and places also became retrospectively known as pogroms.[2] The word is now also sometimes used to describe publicly sanctioned purgative attacks against non-Jewish ethnic or religious groups. The characteristics of a pogrom vary widely, depending on the specific incidents, at times leading to, or culminating in, massacres.

The most significant pogrom in Nazi Germany was the Kristallnacht of 1938 in which at least 91 Jews were killed, a further thirty thousand arrested and subsequently incarcerated in concentration camps, a thousand synagogues burned, and over seven thousand Jewish businesses destroyed or damaged. Notorious pogroms of World War II included the 1941 Farhud in Iraq, the July 1941 Iaşi pogrom in Romania – in which over 13,200 Jews were killed – as well as the Jedwabne pogrom in German-occupied Poland. Post-World War II pogroms included the 1945 Tripoli pogrom, the 1946 Kielce pogrom and the 1947 Aleppo pogrom.

3
Canada really is a cultural mosaic
Take the subway in Montreal and Toronto, or the SkyTrain in Vancouver, and you’ll find yourself surrounded by people from all over the world. Multiculturalism is fundamental to the Canadian identity, and plays an important part in the country’s politics. What this means to someone moving to Canada is that you likely won’t feel the need to fit into any particular cultural mold as you might in India or the United States, for example. More than 40 of the MPs currently sitting in Canadian Parliament weren’t born in the country. Provincial governments and municipal councils make room—both logistically and financially—for the celebration of their peoples’ spectacularly diverse cultural heritages. It’s a country built on mutual respect—one of the many reasons it ranks year after year as one of the best places in the world in which to live.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 13, 2020, 9:58 am

Canadian Slang (Answers at end)

1
Scribbler
A: Notebook
B: Leaky boat engine
C: Defensive hockey player

2
Donnybrook
A: Brawl
B: Good-looking boy
C: Swimming hole

3
Huck
A: Eat quickly
B: Hitchhike
C: Throw




1) Answer: A—Notebook (mainly the Maritimes)
As in, "Get our your scribblers and write your names on the covers," instructed the teacher.

2) Answer: A—Brawl (hockey commentary)
As in, "The Donnybrook Fair in Dublin, Ireland, was so rowdy that any tussle became known as a donnybrook."

3) Answer: C—Throw (West)
As in, "Alina called for her friend to huck her the ball."

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 15, 2020, 8:12 am

1 The first official Olympic mascot was Waldi, one of these low-to-the-ground dogs, at the the 1972 games in Munich.
Labradoodle, Boxer, Chihuahua or a Daschchund

2
This 1883 classic children’s book ends with the words “A well-behaved little boy!”

3
In 1986 Levi’s launched this brand of casual khaki pants.

Docker, Denizen, Unzipped, Signature

4
Jeopardy! set the standard for great game shows. This classic quiz competition first aired on March 30, 1964, and over five decades later it's still one of the most watched trivia shows on TV. Fans all around the world can play as host Alex Trebek gives clues in the form of answers. Contestants then must phrase their response in the form of questions




1 ANSWER
Daschshund

2 ANSWER
Before it was a classic Disney movie, Pinocchio was a children’s book. First published in 1883, The Adventures of Pinocchio was about a mischievous animated marionette and his father Geppetto.

3 ANSWER
Levi’s has a few separate brands, but the one known for its authentic khaki pants is Dockers. It started in 1986 to provide an American classic with a casual look that’s comfortable for moving in.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 16, 2020, 6:12 am

1
Its passengers had a last look at England on September 16, 1620.
The Mayflower was an English ship that brought the first Pilgrims to the New World in 1620. There were about 102 passengers and it took them about 66 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean.

2
In 1964 D.C. residents were allowed to vote for president for the first time, going 85% for this man.
Incumbent Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Republican nominee Barry Goldwater in the 1964 United States presidential election. It was the first election after the ratification of the 23rd Amendment, giving Washington, D.C. electoral votes.

3
The ruins of this temple in Athens, known for its school of philosophy, have recently opened to the public.
The Lyceum was a temple and a gymnasium in Greece dedicated to Apollo Lyceus. Aristotle founded the school of philosophy there around 334/335 BCE, although the temple was used for philosophical debate before then.

4
Spain declared war on this country on October 22, 1859 because its overseas empire was dwindling
The Hispano-Moroccan War, also known as the Tetuán War, lasted from October 22, 1859 to April 26, 1860. Spain declared the war on Morocco and the countries fought until the Treaty of Wad-Ras.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 17, 2020, 7:00 am

1
Which of these four dog breeds has the longest life expectancy?
The Chihuahua can live up to 18 years and there are even reports of some that have surpassed the 20-year mark. The little breeds don’t take as much physical strain as larger ones.

2
Which river runs near the Great Pyramids of Giza?
The Nile is the longest river in Africa and the disputed longest river in the world. The Great Pyramids of Giza are right next to this marvelous wonder of the world.

3
Which celebrity did the Manson Followers tragically murder in Benedict Canyon, Los Angeles?
The Sharon Tate murders were a mass murder put together by the Manson Family. Five adults died that night and Tate was also pregnant at the time, pleading for the life of her unborn child.

4
Who holds the record for the most Guinness World Records?
There are a ton of people who have achieved amazing milestones in the Guinness World Records book. Still, none of them match up to one Ashrita Furman, who has the most.
As of 2017, Furman has set more than 600 official Guinness Records and currently holds 226 records, thus holding the Guinness world record for the most Guinness world records. His most recent record is 31 watermelons sliced on his stomach in one minute He has been breaking records since 1979.[

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 18, 2020, 6:20 am

1
What was the first movie filmed in color?
The first film shot in color was Cupid Angling, made in 1918. Before that, people would enjoy black and white movies without even knowing that things were about to get ten times better.

2
What is the most common language in the world with 1.1 billion speakers?
With over a billion speakers, Mandarin Chinese is the most spoken language in the world. English isn’t far behind with 983 million speakers, and in third place is Hindustani with 544 million speakers.

3
Which mathematical operation begins PEMDAS?
Whenever there are multiple actions taking place in a math equation, the rule of thumb is to use PEMDAS, or “please excuse my dear aunt Sally.” When you use this method, the order is parentheses, exponents, multiplication/division, addition/subtraction.

4
Who was the first Disney character?
Yes, Mickey Mouse is the mascot of Disney, but he wasn’t the first character. The first one was Oswald The Lucky Rabbit. He made his first appearance on September 5, 1927, in a short film called Trolley Troubles.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 19, 2020, 7:19 am

1
Rose Antonia Maria Valland (1 November 1898 – 18 September 1980) was a French art historian, member of the French Resistance, captain in the French military, and one of the most decorated women in French history. She secretly recorded details of the Nazi plundering of National French and private Jewish-owned art from France; and, working with the French Resistance, she saved thousands of works of art.

2
On June 16, 1884, the first roller coaster in America opens at Coney Island, in Brooklyn, New York. Known as a switchback railway, it was the brainchild of LaMarcus Thompson, traveled approximately six miles per hour and cost a nickel to ride. The new entertainment was an instant success and by the turn of the century there were hundreds of roller coasters around the country.


3
The hot dog is said to have been invented at Coney Island in 1867 by Charles Feltman. In 1916, a nickel hot dog stand called Nathan’s was opened by a former Feltman employee and went on to become a Coney Island institution and international franchise. Today, Nathan’s is famous not only for its hot dogs but its hot dog-eating contest, held each Fourth of July in Coney Island.


4
Nureyev became a star of Russian ballet in 1958 when, at barely 20 years old, he was made one of the Kirov Opera Ballet’s featured soloists. The Kirov and the Bolshoi ballet companies were two of the jewels of Soviet cultural diplomacy, and their performances earned worldwide accolades and respect for the arts in the USSR. In June 1961, the Kirov Company finished a run in Paris. On June 16, just as the company was preparing to board a flight home, Nureyev broke from the group and insisted that he was staying in France. According to eyewitnesses, other members of the troupe pleaded with Nureyev to rejoin them and return to the Soviet Union. The dancer refused and threw himself into the arms of airport security people, screaming, “Protect me!” The security officials took Nureyev into custody, whereupon he asked for political asylum. The Kirov Company fretted over the loss of its star and Soviet security guards fumed over Nureyev’s defection. Eventually, the troupe flew back to Russia without the dancer.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 20, 2020, 7:52 am

1
The Statue of Liberty was not a gift from France to America.

2
The Statue was originally designed for the Suez Canal in Egypt.
Bartholdi did not craft the basic design of Liberty specifically for America. As a young man, he had visited Egypt and was enchanted by the project underway to dig a channel between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. At Paris world’s fair of 1867, he met with the Khedive, the leader of Egypt, and proposed creating a work as wondrous as the pyramids or sphinxes. He then designed a colossal woman holding up a lamp and wearing the loose fitting dress of a fellah, a slave, to stand as a lighthouse at the entrance of the Suez Canal. The Egypt deal fell through, so Bartholdi decided to adventure to America to pitch his colossus statue

3
Among the earliest stewards of the nation’s national parks were soldiers from segregated black regiments. Starting in the 1890s, the Buffalo Soldiers, who had earned valor fighting in the Indian Wars and Spanish-American War, added park ranger to their titles and played a critical role in protecting and building the infrastructure of the country’s vast public lands. The first step toward black soldiers’ peacetime service began after the end of the Civil War in 1865. At this time, the army had discharged more than one million soldiers, reducing the military to 16,000 men. But with a war-torn nation in need of rebuilding and a growing desire to expand into the western frontier, Congress enacted legislation that changed the trajectory of black soldiers in the U.S. Army.

4
The world knew her as "Aunt Jemima," but her given name was Nancy Green and she was a true American success story. She was born a slave in 1834 Montgomery County, KY... and became a wealthy superstar in the advertising world, as its first living trademark.

Green was 56-yrs old when she was selected as spokesperson for a new ready-mixed, self-rising pancake flour and made her debut in 1893 at a fair and exposition in Chicago. She demonstrated the pancake mix and served thousands of pancakes... and became an immediate star. She was a good storyteller, her personality was warm and appealing, and her showmanship was exceptional. Her exhibition booth drew so many people that special security personnel were assigned to keep the crowds moving.

Nancy Green was signed to a lifetime contract, traveled on promotional tours all over the country, and was extremely well paid. Her financial freedom and stature as a national spokesperson enabled her to become a leading advocate against poverty and in favor of equal rights for folks in Chicago.

She maintained her job until her death in 1923, at age 89.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by karonsteve » June 20, 2020, 7:30 pm


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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 21, 2020, 8:11 am

1
Countries some that are allowing tourists back in here are 3
Italy
Italy was one of the first European countries to go into lockdown to handle the coronavirus pandemic, and it’s become one of the first to open up to tourists again. Despite having a death toll of over 34,000, and registering thousands of COVID-19 cases a day at its peak in late March, the country has seen a significant drop lately. At the time of writing, the daily new cases have plummeted to around 200. With this huge reduction in mind, from early June, visitors from the UK, EU, Vatican City, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and Schengen Area member nations can enter the country without needing to self-isolate.

Germany
Germany began easing its lockdown restrictions in April and relaxed border controls with Austria, France and Switzerland in mid-May. The travel ban for fellow EU member states and the UK lifts from 15 June, with the exception of any country still in lockdown. Social distancing rules will still apply, however, and non-European countries including the US are still barred from entering the country. There still remains to be a few hundred daily new cases, but it's a huge improvement from the 6,000+ positive cases it recorded at its peak.

Spain
Spain is one of the most popular destinations for UK travelers, and is set to open up again by early July with flights resuming from the UK in mid-June. A requirement for international arrivals to self-isolate for two weeks is also being scrapped from July. It isn’t clear when it will reopen to people flying from the US, though, and there remains a US travel advisory against travel to the country.


2
Canadian Food/Drinks
Caesar
Invented in 1969 by Calgary restaurant manager Walter Chell, this cocktail took off to become enormously popular from there. (Clamato-maker Mott's claims more than 350-million Caesars are sold every year.) Its key ingredients are Clamato juice, vodka, Worchester and a salted rim.

BeaverTails
What's essentially a flattened donut without a hole, BeaverTails are heralded as a quintessential Canadian dish. The recipe was handed down in Graham Hooker's family for generations, but it wasn't until 1978 that he started to introduce it to a wider audience. A year later, he opened his first BeaverTails outlet in Ottawa to dole out the treat, which can come topped with sugar, Nutella and a variety of other sweets.

Tourtière
Here's a deep-rooted French Canadian food that dates back to as early as 1600. The flakey pie is said to have gotten its name from the vessel it's baked in. Tourtiere is typically filled with ground pork, beef, veal or game and a sprinkling of herbs and spices, though in some coastal towns ground fish is used. The hearty meal is most commonly consumed at Christmas and New Years, though Quebec grocery stores keep it stocked year-round. Sometimes topped with whtelse Maple Syrup

3
Considered by Einstein to be "the last man in the world to know everything," Johann Goethe was a German polymath who founded the science of human chemistry and developed one of the earliest known theories of evolution. His estimated IQ scores range from 210 to 225 by different measures.


He's considered one of the greatest figures in Western literature: his 1808 poetic drama, "Faust," is still widely read and studied today.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 22, 2020, 8:16 am

1
Food inventions Canada
Butter Tarts 1900
Nanaimo bars 1952
Ginger Ale Toronto 1907
Hawaiian Pizza 1962
Chewing Gim Toronto 1860's
Pablum Toronto 1930

2
Ugliest City
GUATEMALA CITY, GUATEMALA
This fumes-and-crime-filled city is the capital of an otherwise beautiful country. It looks more like a slum than a capital city, with most buildings appearing on the verge of collapse.
MEXICO CITY, MEXICO
It's currently known as one of the world's most dangerous cities, but even if it was a safe haven, it still would not be a very inviting city. It's one of the world's most polluted and there isn't much to look at.
3
Expensive foods
Densuke Black Watermelon
In the list of top ten most expensive food in the world, the Densuke Black watermelon is the won which has highest cost in the market, the most valuable food is available from Hokkaido area of Japan while according to the reports that during its harvesting at auctions it was sold for about $3,000 to$6,000 but people who have not such enough money to get this most delicious food they can acquire if from Toronto at Loblaws at 200 US dollar, it is such a food which has become popular in all over the world and named as one of the most expensive foods in market.

Brown Lipped Abalone
The china dish Brown Lipped Abalone is considered as most expensive food in the world because its price is about $173600 dollars which is damn too high, the people who have a lot of money they only can buy it, an Emperor of Korea gifted this most delicious food to china, many people around the world are want to eat it but only some can, it is also known as most delicious seafood I the world which is very rare, it has a unique taste which makes it different from other foods while its taste is sweet and as well like sushi.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 23, 2020, 2:47 pm

1
Steady-state
The steady-state theory was conceived in the mid-20thcentury as an alternative to the Big Bang to explain the origin of matter and the expansion of the universe. Rather than the universe exploding outward, the theory posits that it has always expanded and will always expand, with new matter bubbling up all the time to keep it at the same density. The discovery in 1965 of the cosmic microwave background, leftover radiation from the Big Bang, ruled it out for good.

2
Albert Einstein

On success:
"If A is a success in life, then A equals X plus Y plus Z. Work is X; Y is play; and Z is keeping your mouth shut."

On imagination:
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world."

On learning:
"Most teachers waste their time by asking questions that are intended to discover what a pupil does not know, whereas the true art of questioning is to discover what the pupil does know or is capable of knowing."

On science:
"One thing I have learned in a long life: that all our science, measured against reality, is primitive and childlike — and yet it is the most precious thing we have.

3
Presidents who lost re election
1912, William Howard Taft lost re-election to Woodrow Wilson.
1932, Herbert Hoover lost re-election to Franklin D. Roosevelt.
1980, Jimmy Carter lost re-election to Ronald Reagan.
1992, George H.W. Bush lost re-election to Bill Clinton.
Also, since he technically wasn’t elected, as he was appointed vice president by Richard Nixon after Spiro Agnew’s resignation from a tax evasion incident when he was Governor of Maryland and then later Nixon himself resigned from the Watergate scandal, he didn’t lose re-election, but in the 1976 election, Gerald Ford was running for a full term in his own right but he lost the election to Jimmy Carter. As a result, this election made Ford the only president in American history to have never been elected.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 24, 2020, 6:23 am

1
US Generals executed during WW2
The following officers were executed.

Brigadier General Guy Osborne Fort (U.S. Army) Commanding General, 81st Philippine Division. Nothing more is known of Fort’s death, only that he was captured, tortured, and executed by the Japanese in 1942, age 63.

Brigadier General Vicente Lim (U.S. Army) Commanding General, 41st Philippine Division. Native Filipino, survived the Death March, released by the Japanese, joined the resistance, captured, tortured and executed by the Japanese, age 56.

2
Nearly 1,100 U.S. Army generals served at some point during World War II, and of those about 40 died during or immediately following the war. Not all were in combat units, and some were not in enemy territory when they died.

3

Basil L. Plumley (January 1, 1920 – October 10, 2012) was a career soldier and airborne combat infantryman in the United States Army who rose to the rank of command sergeant major. As a Combat veteran of World War II and the Vietnam War. He is most noted for his actions during the Battle of Ia Drang in Vietnam.
He fought in Vietnam with the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment. He participated in the Battle of Ia Drang in Vietnam in 1965, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Hal Moore, who praised Plumley as an outstanding NCO and leader in the 1992 book about this battle, We Were Soldiers Once… and Young. The book was the basis for the 2002 film We Were Soldiers, in which Plumley was played by actor Sam Elliott. Plumley was known affectionately by his soldiers as "Old Iron Jaw". Command Sergeant Major Basil Plumley served in the Republic of Korea between 1972 and 1973.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 25, 2020, 7:39 am

1
Early 1970s recession
The UK experienced a GDP contraction of up to 3.9%. Inflation shot up to over 20% and the number of jobless swelled. Unlike that of America, the UK's recovery was W-shaped with the country suffering a double-dip recession, while post-recession the government had to go cap in hand to the IMF to ask for an enormous loan in 1976. Countries reliant on oil imports such as France and Japan tended to be most affected during this downturn.

2
Great Recession
The deepest and most long-lasting economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Great Recession dragged on from December 2007 to June 2009 in the US, an agonizing 18 months, with other countries experiencing similar durations. However, some nations, including Spain, were trapped in the mire for a considerably longer period. At its root cause was the the US housing bubble which, buoyed on by everything from deregulation to risky lending practices, developed in the early 2000s and reached its peak in 2006.

3
June 23 1992
Mafia boss John Gotti, who was nicknamed the “Teflon Don” after escaping unscathed from several trials during the 1980s, is sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty on 14 accounts of conspiracy to commit murder and racketeering. Moments after his sentence was read in a federal courthouse in Brooklyn, hundreds of Gotti’s supporters stormed the building and overturned and smashed cars before being forced back by police reinforcements.

4 Gold is $57.22 per gram

Taaffeite
Cost: $11,250 per gram
Taaffeite is a very rare, light violet gemstone, far more rare than a diamond. The gem is named after its discoverer, Austrian geologist Richard Taaffe, who found the first stone in 1945. Taaffeite has thus far only been unearthed in Tanzania and Sri Lanka.

Antimatter
Cost: $62.5 trillion per gram
Antimatter is considered to be the most expensive substance on Earth because it requires an incredible amount of energy to generate. According to CERN, it requires several hundred million pounds just to create one-billionth of a gram of antimatter. It also happens to be extremely dangerous, as it annihilates any matter that it may come into contact with in a huge explosion, the size of which is determined by Einstein’s famous E=mc² equation.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 26, 2020, 8:02 am

1
Red Diamonds
Cost: $5 million per gram
Red diamonds are the rarest version of colored diamonds in the world, with no specimens at all being presented to the Gemological Institute of America for grading from 1957 to 1987, an impressive 30-year span. Most of the world’s true red diamonds have been produced by Western Australia’s Argyle mine, which is slated for closure in 2020, perhaps making red diamonds even more rare.

2
1864 - The Battle of Dybbøl
The Battle of Dybbøl was the key battle of the Second Schleswig War, fought between Denmark and Prussia. The battle was fought on the morning of 18 April 1864, following a siege that began on 7 April. Denmark suffered a severe defeat which ultimately decided the outcome of the war.

3
On June 25, 1950, North Korean forces surprised the South Korean army (and the small U.S. force stationed in the country), and quickly headed toward the capital city of Seoul. The United States responded by pushing a resolution through the U.N.’s Security Council calling for military assistance to South Korea. (Russia was not present to veto the action as it was boycotting the Security Council at the time.)
With this resolution in hand, President Harry S. Truman rapidly dispatched U.S. land, air, and sea forces to Korea to engage in what he termed a “police action.” The American intervention turned the tide, and U.S. and South Korean forces marched into North Korea. This action, however, prompted the massive intervention of communist Chinese forces in late 1950. The war in Korea subsequently bogged down into a bloody stalemate. In 1953, the United States and North Korea signed a cease-fire that ended the conflict. The cease-fire agreement also resulted in the continued division of North and South Korea at just about the same geographical point as before the conflict.

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mech_401
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by mech_401 » June 26, 2020, 9:16 pm

allen millyard , from reading england. truly a genius-level tinkerer, machinist, welder, wrench has over decades been working on designs to
add cylinders to two-stroke & petrol motorcycle engines of 70s turning 2 cyls into 4 cyls or 5-6
if you like classic bikes, google his utube page

Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 27, 2020, 7:48 am

3 THINGS ONE SHOULD KNOW HOW TO DO
1
You should know how to remember peoples’ names.
Most people are tired of that excuse that seems to glide off of so many people’s lips “I’m not good at remembering names…” Let’s stop making this excuse because a person’s name is the single most important thing you can possibly remember when you meet someone new. A good way to remember someone’s name is to say it at least twice during the conversation.

2
You should know how to detect a lie.
Learning to detect when someone is lying to you seems like a sneaky thing to do, but you’d be surprised how handy it could become, especially if you’re raising children, or in charge of a huge team. It gives you the chance to consider all possibilities in a relationship. Did you know 91 percent of humans lie on a regular basis at work and at home, and you’re lied to about 2 or 3 times in a ten minute conversation? Yeah. Food for thought.

3
You should know how to shut up and listen genuinely.
If you learn to do this well, you will be loved and admired, and you will understand people better. It can improve relationships drastically, and ultimately make you a more compassionate person.

4
Now that we have taught nealy everyone on the Planet how and why to wear a mask, the next hill to climb will be teach people how to use an Indicator, signal light on a motor vehicle or Motorbike.
Small Baby Steps

5
Captain Kangaroo holds the record as the longest running children's show on commercial television. Only Sesame Street has lasted longer, but it ran on public television until earlier this year when it switched to HBO.

Doodoo
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Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » June 29, 2020, 7:57 am

1
10 reasons to quit smoking . I was one, for 32 years and a good one . At the end I had to hand in 50 to 75 cigarettes a day. I was in a country where I could by a Carton of Pine (Korean) for $2.80. One day I had a choice, keep on smoking or breath. I still love the smell of a ciagrette and sometimes yet rarely you can find me in the smoking area get a quick snort of what used to be. Here ya go 10 reasons

Ten Reasons to Quit Smoking (in no special order)



You won't smell anymore. Apologies, but there is no polite way to put it; smokers stink. They smell. They reek. Their 1 breath smells like an ashtray. Their clothes are foul and gross.

2 You will regain your sense of smell and taste. It is truly an amazing thing; I lived and/or visited Thailand for more than 25 years, but after I quit smoking, Thai food became twice as good. Seriously, twice as good!

3 You won't look like a dried-up lizard. Smoking makes your face/skin look old; quitting smoking means putting 'lizard-ness' off for a decade or two.

4 If you quit smoking, you don't have to listen to people like me, your spouse, your kids, your friends and complete strangers telling how smoking is bad for you. Wouldn't it be nice if we all shut up? If you didn't have to hear us?

5 It is easier to pull/keep chicks. Simply put, it is easier to pull and/or keep a hot chick as a non-smoker rather than as a smoker. Nuff' said.

6 You won't get sick as often. Yes, I know, perhaps smoking helps with c-19 and perhaps it doesn't. But, a non-smoker will catch fewer flus, colds, infections, etc. than a smoker; it is a scientific fact.

7 You won't hurt those around you. Second-hand smoke kills about 50,000 people a year and damages the health of many, many, many more; don't you want to stop hurting your wife? Your kids? Your friends? Your neighbours? Strangers on the road?

8 You'll have more breath. Smokers; when was the last time you climbed three flights of stairs without panting or wheezing? Without some shortness of breath? Without stopping for a sec to catch your breath at the top?

9 Money. Cigarettes are expensive and you get nothing (literally nothing) for your money. One example; by quitting when I did, I saved approximately 190,000 Baht. What would you do with an extra 190,000 Baht? Whooo-Hoooo!

10 Impotence. It is a medical fact that smoking reduces the lead in your pencil. Further, it is also medical fact that the more you smoke, the more the lead in your pencil is reduced. Simple question; what's better? Smoking or sex? If you chose sex (and you really should have), then it is time to quit.


2
Einstein
On curiosity:
"The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day."

3
On common sense:
"Common sense is nothing more than a deposit of prejudices laid down in the mind before you reach eighteen."

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