Yes it really happened

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saint
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by saint » May 5, 2020, 12:11 pm

Those prices look very reasonable . I cant wait for the travel restrictions to be lifted .
I just cannot see how anyone could justify those prices unless of course the meal was cooked by the almighty , in a solid gold wok and served on a virgins navel .



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 6, 2020, 7:09 am

1) Old time Remedies
Acne:

Buffaloberry – Used as food and in herbal remedies. Overindulgence can cause severe problems including death.
Burdock – Roots and leaves utilized internally and externally. Avoid if pregnant or nursing.
Cat’s Claw – Used in teas and tonics for more than 2,000 years.
Chasteberry – Berries and flowers used in teas. Pregnant or breast-feeding women should not take Chasteberry.
Dandelion – Used in both foods and internal and external medical remedies.
Lavender – Dating back to Roman times, Lavender has been used in teas, balms, food, and medicinal remedies.
Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Black Cohosh – Roots of the plant were used in teas for a variety of ailments.
Burdock – Roots and leaves utilized internally and externally. Avoid if pregnant or nursing.
Dong Quai – Used for more than a thousand years to treat a number of conditions.Devil’s Claw – Used in teas and tonics internally and in poultices externally. Should not be used by woman who are or may be pregnant.
Honeysuckle – Used in traditional herbal remedies for thousands of years.

2) The Great Depression
The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across the world; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. The Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the global economy can decline.

The Great Depression started in the United States after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929, (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%. By comparison, worldwide GDP fell by less than 1% from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession. Some economies started to recover by the mid-1930s. However, in many countries, the negative effects of the Great Depression lasted until the beginning of World War II.

The Great Depression had devastating effects in both rich and poor countries. Personal income, tax revenue, profits and prices dropped, while international trade fell by more than 50%. Unemployment in the U.S. rose to 23% and in some countries rose as high as 33%.

Cities around the world were hit hard, especially those dependent on heavy industry. Construction was virtually halted in many countries. Farming communities and rural areas suffered as crop prices fell by about 60%.[7][8][9] Facing plummeting demand with few alternative sources of jobs, areas dependent on primary sector industries such as mining and logging suffered the most

3) Food of The Great Depression
A) Mulligan stew was reportedly first created by the homeless population during the Depression and was a total mish-mosh of whatever food the neighborhood had. The homeless would come together around a campfire and throw together their bits and bobs in a big pot to make Mulligan stew. Sometimes this included sawdust and lint, which supposedly made the stew more filling. Today, it looks more like a traditional vegetable stew with carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, and beef

B) Mock Apple Pie
Mock” anything makes us skeptical, as it should. And this pie is definitely something to be skeptical about. Instead of real apples, Depression-era mock apple pie uses Ritz crackers as an apple filling alternative. Um — yikes. Emmy from the emmymadeinjapan YouTube channel tried the recipe out, and she couldn’t believe how apple-y (and delicious) mock apple pie actually is.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » May 6, 2020, 10:35 am

saint wrote:
May 5, 2020, 12:11 pm
Those prices look very reasonable. I cant wait for the travel restrictions to be lifted.
I just cannot see how anyone could justify those prices unless of course the meal was cooked by the almighty , in a solid gold wok and served on a virgins navel.
Agreed. I did go to the old restaurant; and I must say, the food was spectacular; I would say one of the two best meals I have ever had. Same concept, fixed price (which was less than the prices at the new place), fixed menu. Dinner consisted of 25 courses, served sequentially, of 2-3 bites each. A food allergy made one of the courses a no go for me; so they made me something entirely new to replace that course.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 7, 2020, 6:29 am

1) Purple bullets do in fact exist. They are called PC bullets. They have a polymer coating instead of brass or copper. That basically means the actual bullet is a lead core surrounded by a polymer coating in a casing. Supposedly they are more accurate and cleaner rounds. They do not claim to do more damage or that they are more lethal.

2) According to the IATA air lines revenues have declined $314 Billion due to the Virus

3) 71 years ago in Canada

House rent $50 Year 2020 $1893/month
New car $1420 Year 2017 $33,464
Postage stamp $.03 Year 2020 $1.07
Pound of bacon $.50 Year 2020 $5.46

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by tamada » May 7, 2020, 7:12 am

saint wrote:
May 5, 2020, 12:11 pm
Those prices look very reasonable . I cant wait for the travel restrictions to be lifted .
I just cannot see how anyone could justify those prices unless of course the meal was cooked by the almighty , in a solid gold wok and served on a virgins navel .
Apparently they have your first two requisites in hand but are having huge problems procuring that sort of navel.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 8, 2020, 7:38 am

1) Most Canadians live south of Seattle
Canada and the United States are both large countries which can make understanding the relative geography difficult. But the contiguous United States goes farther north than you think and the majority of Canadians live near the southern border. The result? At 45 degrees latitude, Seattle is farther north than Toronto and Montreal, meaning that 64 per cent of Canadians live south of Seattle

2) More French soldiers died during World War I than American soldiers during all of U.S. history
World War I was catastrophic on levels that most of us alive today cannot even comprehend. One example? The numbers of total deaths. During the first world war, France lost about 1,360,000 soldiers. In contrast, the United States has recorded about 1,350,000 military deaths total, over every war since 1775.

3) There is a species of jellyfish that is immortal
Think that immortality is just a fantasy? Well, it is for humans. But scientists have discovered that the Turritopsis dohrnii jellyfish can revert back to its juvenile polyp stage after maturing, continuing in an endless cycle making it the only known officially immortal creature. This species of jellyfish isn't the only one, however—here are more immortal animals that can basically live forever.

4) The U.S. government has an official plan for a zombie apocalypse
Think The Walking Dead is straight-up fiction? Well, it is—but the government wants to be prepared for a real-life version anyhow. The 31-page Counter-Zombie Dominance Plan, or CONPLAN 8888-11, was designed in 2011.

And just in case you think it's weird bureaucratic humour, the first line reads, "This plan was not actually designed as a joke."

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Re: Yes it really DOES happened

Post by Drunk Monkey » May 9, 2020, 7:46 am

Monday 11th May is another holiday day in Thailand ..The Royal Ploughing Ceremony.... fear ye not it is only recognized by the government sectors not a public holiday and alcohol sales and consumption are not effected , in fact i did read below the oxen taking part are given rice whiskey at the ceremony.

https://publicholidays.asia/thailand/ro ... -ceremony/

DM
Claret n Blue all way thru .. Up the Iron
L2 Season 19/20 Codheads 0 Scunny 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2qrsItFUug
8 minutes is the point of lift off !!!!!!!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 9, 2020, 8:19 am

1) Froot Loops are all the same flavour
Sure those sweetened O's are all different colours, but that doesn't mean they are different flavours. Kellogg's, the company who makes them, has admitted that each Froot Loop is "froot flavoured" which they describe as "a blend of fruit flavours." Not all facts are factual—like these false facts everyone believes.

2) Prince Charles has a car fueled by wine
In the search for more efficient fuels, Prince Charles is taking a strange-but-entertaining approach: The heir to the British throne had his vintage Aston Martin reworked to use wine as its primary fuel

3) The Earth isn't round
Don't get excited yet Flat Earthers—the planet we all call home isn't flat but it's not round either. Technically the Earth is known as an "oblate spheroid" due to the bulge at the equator and the flattened poles.

4) If you're shot by a sniper, you'll be dead before you hear the gun
The speed of sound is 343 metres/second. But a bullet fired from a rifle travels at 762 metres/second. This means that if you're ever targeted by an expert marksman you'll be dead before you hear the gunshot. Which is comforting? We guess?


5) The city of London only has a population of 9,000
London may be one of the largest metropolises in the world but when it comes to actual people, only 9,000 reside in the City of London. The city is a small area surrounded by the Greater London region—which has 8.1 million people.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by cali4995 » May 10, 2020, 4:08 am

chuck norris was born on may 7th, 1945

the axis-powers capitulated on following day

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 10, 2020, 7:11 am

1) There are more trees on Earth than stars in the galaxy
There are about three trillion trees on Earth but only 300 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way. Space is big but relatively empty, it turns out.

2) You can rent out an entire country
Country clubs and hotel ballrooms are so passe—if you really want to throw a party everyone will remember, try renting out an entire country for the night. For just $70,000 you can rent Lichtenstein for an evening. If that seems excessive, you can always just rent one of the six Austrian villages, three German towns, or one Swiss ski-resort village.

3) Sesame seeds were once worth more than gold
The people of the Middle Ages prized sesame seeds so highly that they cost more than their weight in gold. They're highly nutritious and tasty but many civilizations thought they also held magical or spiritual properties, bestowing luck and fortune. Now you'll never pick them off your hamburger bun again, right?

4) The fastest object ever made by man was a manhole cover
When it comes to sheer speed, race cars, fighter jets, and space rockets have nothing on a round, flat hunk of metal normally found covering a sewer. It wasn't made to be a speedster but when an underground nuclear bomb test launched the four-inch thick steel disk at an estimated 125,000 miles per hour or 5 times the Earth's escape velocity
, it became the winner. In contrast, the New Horizons spacecraft maxed out at 36,373 mph.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by cali4995 » May 11, 2020, 3:33 am

theres now 133 whisky distilleries in scotland operational. up from 120 two months ago. alcohol
as a disinfectant ? hand rub? face rinse? possibly

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 11, 2020, 7:57 am

1)
Longest Field GoaLs in the NFL
Matt Prater, Denver Broncos: 64 Yards (2013)
Tom Dempsey, New Orleans Saints: 63 Yards (1970)
Jason Elam, Denver Broncos: 63 Yards (1998)
Sebastian Janikowski, Oakland Raiders: 63 Yards (2011)
David Akers, San Francisco 49ers: 63 Yards (2012)

2)
Who is the biggest country in the world?
Russia.
Canada.
United States.
China.
Brazil.

3)
No river: Saudi Arabia - With a total area of 2.15 million sq km, Saudi Arabia is the largest country without a river.

4)
The smallest bone in the human body is the stirrup bone, the stapes, one of the 3 bones that make up your middle ear; measuring 2-3 millimeters. It shaped like a “U” and is the innermost bone that receives sound vibrations and passes them along to the cochlea to eventually be interpreted by the brain.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 13, 2020, 9:55 am

1) 7-11s
Japan almost 21,000 and in Thailand only 11,300 Alot to do to catch up

2)
Time Magazine claims, “From east to west, Hawaii is the widest U.S. state, measuring 1,500 miles from the island of Niihau to the island of Hawaii.” Wikipedia claims that Hawaii state extends “1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll.” Now, take a look at Alaska.

How wide is Alaska from east to West?
North to South, Alaska is 1,400 miles long. East to West, it is 2,700 miles wide. Alaska has the longest general coastline of any state. The Alaskan coastline extends for 6,640 miles, a distance greater than that of all the other states' coastlines combined.
3) 71 years ago in Canada

House rent $50 Year 2020 $1893/month
New car $1420 Year 2017 $33,464
Postage stamp $.03 Year 2020 $1.07
Pound of bacon $.50 Year 2020 $5.46

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 14, 2020, 2:52 am

1) throughout the United States, 18.4% of Americans under age 18 — a total of 13.4 million children — live in poverty, one of the highest child poverty rates of any developed nation. Children born into poverty are likely to continue to live in impoverished circumstances as adults. In a 2017 study from the US Partnership on Mobility from Poverty that tracked 18,000 individuals since 1968, researchers found that only 16% of children who spent a majority of their childhoods in poverty were living above the poverty line between the ages of 25 and 30. Poverty in America also disproportionately affects minority families and exacerbates existing socioeconomic inequalities along racial lines.

2) Census information released by Statistics Canada Wednesday shows that in 2015, nearly 1.2 million children across Canada were living in low-income households, representing about 17 per cent of all Canadian children.

3) In the UK there are aproximately 5,000,000 children living in poverty

4) Twenty-six percent of Russian children under the age of 18 lived on less than 10,000 rubles ($150) per month in 2017, the State Statistics Service (Rosstat) said. That’s double the 13.2% of Russia’s overall population, or 19.4 million people, who lived below the poverty line that year.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 15, 2020, 6:10 am

1)
Creation of the Hudson’s Bay Company — May 2, 1670
The Hudson’s Bay Company is the world’s oldest joint-stock merchandizing company in the English-speaking world. Still operating to this day, the company long controlled the fur trade, which had significant consequences for First Nations peoples.

2)
First telegraph message transmitted in Canada — December 19, 1846
The country's first telegraph message was sent from Toronto to Hamilton by the Toronto-Hamilton-Niagara and St. Catharines Electro-Magnetic Company. The telecommunications industry would play a crucial role in the development of infrastructure and the Canadian economy during the 19th century.

3)
First long-distance telephone call — August 10, 1876
On August 10, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a long-distance phone call only a few months after making his first call to his assistant in the next room. This time, the inventor of the telephone received a call in Paris, Ontario, from his father and uncle in Brantford, Ontario, 13 kilometres away.

4)
James Naismith invents basketball — December 21, 1891
Seeking to create an indoor game that was “fair for all players, and free of rough play,” Canadian physical education teacher James Naismith invented basketball. The first game was held on December 21, 1891, at Springfield College in Massachusetts.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 16, 2020, 8:34 am

1) 2016: Million-dollar baseball cards
While sifting through their late great-grandparents' belongings, a family found an old paper bag which they were about to throw away. At the last minute they checked the contents before ditching it, which lead to them discovering seven Ty Cobb baseball cards among old postcards and papers. The cards turned out to be extremely rare collectibles that dated from the early 1900s, meaning that they were worth more than $1 million.

2) 2018: The fifth largest diamond in the world
In March 2018 the 'Lesotho Legend' was discovered by British firm Gem Diamonds. The hefty rock is the fifth largest gem-quality diamond ever to have been found and it sold for $40 million to an anonymous buyer in Antwerp. The gemstone provided a huge boost to Gem Diamonds, which saw its share price surge by 15% following the find.

3) 2019: Winston Churchill's cigar and top hat
Iconic belongings of the British wartime prime minister Winston Churchill were discovered by a refuse worker who couldn't quite believe that he'd found the items in the rubbish. The prime minister's personal effects were showcased on the UK version of Antiques Roadshow along with 200 letters from Churchill's cook to a son, which provided a fascinatingly detailed insight into the prime minister's day-to-day life. The collection was valued at $13,140.

4) Lightning Doesn’t Strike In The Same Place Twice
This saying most likely came about from somebody trying to convince themselves or others that they were safe during a lightning storm. When lightning didn’t strike the same spot twice, they probably took it as fact and decided to pass their newfound “knowledge” to others.
In reality, lightning can absolutely strike in the same spot twice, and it’s not even all that rare to happen. The Empire State Building in New York gets struck 20 to 25 times a year. On one occasion, it was hit eight times in just 24 minutes!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 17, 2020, 7:41 am

1)
Washington’s wooden teeth
The notion that George Washington’s teeth were carved from wood may have emerged from the fact that they looked wooden when they were just . . . dirty. “Port wine being sower [sour] takes off all the polish,” cautioned Washington’s dentist after receiving a “very black” set of dentures for repair. The dentures, it turns out, were made from a troubling mix of gold, ivory, lead, animal, and human teeth. The latter were sold by enslaved persons, likely under duress, foreshadowing the modern-day black market in transplant organs.

2)
Vaccines and autism
Few false beliefs are as persistently harmful as the one that links autism to MMR vaccines. Based on a fraudulent, thoroughly discredited, and retracted paper published in 1998, anti-vax hysteria allowed diseases like measles—once virtually wiped out in developed countries—to resurge around the world, causing 140,000 deaths in 2018 alone. That mistrust has spread to other life-saving immunizations for illnesses like the flu, which causes an estimated 650,000 deaths worldwide each year.

3)
Lemming mass suicides
“Lemming” as an epithet implies one who blindly follows the masses to one’s doom. That false analogy is based on a cruelly staged scene in Disney’s White Wilderness (1958), where scores of lemmings appear to throw themselves into the ocean to perish. In fact, periodic population booms force the tiny rodents to migrate in herds in search of food; when the front line reaches the edge of a body of water or a cliff, they can be forced over—quite unwillingly.

4)
Rechargeable batteries
There’s no such thing as a rechargeable battery. More specifically, batteries don’t store a charge in the first place: they store energy. Simply put, the energy in your phone, for instance, comes from chemical reactions inside the battery. “Recharging” is actually reversing that chemical reaction so it can happen all over again. To be fair, it’s a question of terminology more than anything. Reversible batteries, anyone?

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by mech_401 » May 18, 2020, 2:14 am

(3) in the U.K. there are approximately 5 million
children living in poverty.

well , there's only 60 million people in total . how
many are below 18 ? seems excessive for island

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 18, 2020, 8:07 am

1) Use Vinegar
Vinegar makes a cheap, environmentally friendly weed killer. Simply spray it onto the weeds and the acid in the vinegar will scorch the plants, killing them within days. Afterwards, water the garden and sprinkle baking soda onto the soil to neutralize the acidity.

2) Heaviest dog breed
Also one of the tallest dogs, the Great Dane can reach 30-34 inches tall at the withers and large males can reach up to 200lbs.

Newfoundland
What looks like a large teddy bear is a dog called a Newfoundland. The heaviest recorded Newfoundland was 260lbs. and over 6 feet long! That’s quite a gentle giant!

St Bernards
These gentle giants started as excellent working dogs from the Swiss Alps. They were used as carting and rescue dogs, and therefore their size resembles that of a small horse. Males can top a weight of 264lbs!

3) HOTTEST PEPPER
The previous world champion, Carolina Reaper has been beat! by itself… The Carolina Reaper is once again officially the Worlds Hottest Pepper.

Originally ranked as world’s hottest in 2013, the Reaper was tested again in 2018 with an even higher SHU. (71,000 SHU higher to be exact) This gives the reaper a renewed title as World’s Hottest!

It was bred for heat and that it is, with an average SHU of 1,641,000 SHU and peaks at 2.2 Million SHU!

Let’s put the scoville rating into perspective for you:

The Carolina Reaper pepper is 200x hotter than a Jalapeno #WorldsHottestPepper

Just looking at it, you know its one mean pepper. The Carolina Reaper has a unique stinger tail that is unlike any other pepper. It gets this insane heat from being a cross between a Ghost Pepper and a Red Habanero.

Oddly enough this pepper doesn’t just have heat, but excellent fruity flavor to boot. Well, that is before it melts your face off.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » May 19, 2020, 8:07 am

1) In the year 2408.6 it is apparent that while viewing Star Trek, it is noted that they after looking at Captain Jean Luc Picard they have still not found a cure for Baldness.

2) Published on 15 April 1755 and written by Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, sometimes published as Johnson's Dictionary, is among the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language.
There was dissatisfaction with the dictionaries of the period, so in June 1746 a group of London booksellers contracted Johnson to write a dictionary for the sum of 1,500 guineas (£1,575), equivalent to about £250,000 in 2020. Johnson took seven years to complete the work, although he had claimed he could finish it in three. He did so single-handedly, with only clerical assistance to copy the illustrative quotations that he had marked in books. Johnson produced several revised editions during his life.

3) On June 13th in 1895, the world’s first automobile race took place. The first race took place with only a handful of cars and their top speeds were only twenty kilometres per hour. The world’s first automobile race was the brainchild of two French engineers and businessmen. The people behind the first car race were two men, who had an automobile shop in Paris. Emile Levassor and Rene Panhard came up with the idea of racing their cars, as a way of promoting their business.

4) On February 21, 1948, the National Association for Stock Car Racing–or NASCAR, as it will come to be widely known–is officially incorporated. NASCAR racing will go on to become one of America’s most popular spectator sports, as well as a multi-billion-dollar industry.

The driving force behind the establishment of NASCAR was William “Bill” France Sr. (1909-1992), a mechanic and auto-repair shop owner from Washington, D.C., who in the mid-1930s moved to Daytona Beach, Florida. The Daytona area was a gathering spot for racing enthusiasts, and France became involved in racing cars and promoting races. After witnessing how racing rules could vary from event to event and how dishonest promoters could abscond with prize money, France felt there was a need for a governing body to sanction and promote racing. He gathered members of the racing community to discuss the idea, and NASCAR was born, with its official incorporation in February 1921. France served as NASCAR’s first president and played a key role in shaping its development in the sport’s early decades.

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